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3

Your are attempting to reinvent wheels. Logrotate does this efficiently: https://www.linode.com/docs/uptime/logs/use-logrotate-to-manage-log-files http://www.rackspace.com/knowledge_center/article/understanding-logrotate-utility https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/how-to-configure-logging-and-log-rotation-in-apache-on-an-ubuntu-vps Rather ...


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The standard template for remote forwarding uses a traditional BSD Syslog format. Try to use the predefined template RSYSLOG_SyslogProtocol23Format to forward in syslog-protocol format with structured data. E.g.: *.* @logserver;RSYSLOG_SyslogProtocol23Format


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TL;DR: AppEnforce.log indeed logs the context incorrectly (at least for "Script Installer" technology). The Test I created a deployment type with the following attributes: Technology: Script Installer Installation behavior: Install for system Logon requirement: Whether or not a user is logged on Installation program visibility: Hidden Installation ...


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It has been known in the *nix and network community for a long time that logging usernames can sometimes divulge the password of an account. For example: Someone types the username, and accidentally hits return twice. This will result in two login failures being logged, one for the username, and one for the password in the username field.


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This is a bug introduced in CoreOS 561 when the default file system was changed from btrfs to the overlayfs. I found a workaround to basically format the filesystem using btrfs when a host is first started, and that seems to be working for now. Include the following in your CloudInit: #cloud-config coreos: units: - name: ...


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This question was correctly answered on stackoverflow by one of the authors of Passenger. Here's a copy of his answer. Restarting Nginx would actually make the log file come back. It's just that you're not using the right method to restart Nginx, because your Nginx install was installed from source. Init scripts, e.g. /etc/init.d/nginx and service nginx ...


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Add following in your logrotate configuration (new file under /etc/logrotate.d/) /mnt/usb_storage/log.txt { rotate 5 # Change this to number of files you need to preserve monthly prerotate /usr/bin/sed -e '1,100000d' < /mnt/usb_storage/log.txt endscript postrotate ...


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A ping every 10 seconds really isn't going to cause any performance issues. The AWS pings are probably sent directly from Amazon (Heroku is on the Amazon AWS marketplace, so it's probably hosted by them) to keep statistics on uptime/latency/etc. If someone was probing your box it would be followed up with more invasive scans.


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It is simple, someone accesses http://ip.add.re.ss. That retrieves a page without hostname. You can make a default virtual host in Apache that returns 404 to the visitor to minimize the effect of these requests.


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AFAIK that external logging is a yum extra and not available natively with rpm. You can query the RPM database, rpm -qa --last gives a history of when the current RPM packages were installed, but no information on package deletes.



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