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5

Your lvextend command is incorrect. You told it to 'make the logical volume the size of 100% of the free space.' I think you intended to say 'make the logical volume GROW by the size of 100% of the free space.' lvextend -l 100%FREE /dev/VolGroup00/LogVol01 Should be: lvextend -l +100%FREE /dev/VolGroup00/LogVol01 Note the '+'.


5

Rather than "strip size" and "stripe size", the XFS man pages use the terms "stripe unit" and "stripe width" respectively. This makes it possible to decode the otherwise confusing text in the mkfs.xfs(8) man page: sunit=value This is used to specify the stripe unit for a RAID device or a ...


5

I think you need to resize the /dev/sda3 partition to be bigger, now it's only 1.1 TB instead of the rest of the disk.


3

Your last partition is sized to be only 1.1TB, so you have some space on your disk that is not allocated to a partition. You have two choices: Resize the third partition or create a new partition. If your disk is partitioned with GPT you may also need to relocate the backup partition table to the end of the disk. To resize the partition you need to first ...


3

First, it is perfectly normal that DM devices does not have any I/O scheduler, as (with specific exceptions) About the low performance you recorded, consider that your H310 controller not only has no cache, but it even disables the physical disk's DRAM cache, meaning your system has no way to lower latency via caching. Combining that with encryption, where ...


3

To grow a XFS filesystem to use the space allocated to it after resizing the volume xfs_growfs /mount/point e.g. xfs_growfs /data/www


2

The pvmove tool is what you want here. It is able to seamlessly and safely migrate the extents of a logical volume between physical volumes (disks or partitions). There is no availability impact, however significant disk I/O is performed, so depending on your disk subsystem's performance capacity, there may be some service degradation during the move.


2

LVM will only show space that has been formatted for LVM by using pvcreate. Here, it doesn't seem you even have a partition. 1) First you need to create the partition (sda3 I suppose), using your favorite partitioning tool. Assign the LVM tag to the partition. Then, assuming that your 121GB partition is /dev/sda3, you need to run pvcreate /dev/sda3 to get ...


1

According to Redhat staff: Grub doesn't support LVM RAID1 (it supports only RAID 4/5/6 type IIRC). Debian 8 has some old interior, you could hit the same limitation, I wanted to find some official info about Grub's limitations, unfortunately I've failed. Re: [linux-lvm] GRUB boot problem with lvm mirror type raid1 From: Peter Rajnoha <prajnoha ...


1

You need to update your GRUB and boot kernel installation. update-initramfs -u This command updates your boot kernel configuration to match the current state of your system. mdadm --detail --scan > /tmp/mdadm.conf Copy /tmp/mdadm.conf contents to /etc/mdadm/mdadm.conf replacing any previous entries. This way the MD device configuration information ...



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