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1

This is most likely possible, though it depends on how you've implemented RAID. If you're using Linux software RAID (e.g. mdadm), live RAID type conversions are definitely possible. If you're using hardware RAID in a server, most modern RAID controllers support live RAID type conversions... Though you'd want to check the user manual for the particular ...


5

Sometimes the relevant documentation is hidden away in configuration files rather than in, say, the documentation. So it seems with LVM. By default LVM will automatically attempt to activate volumes on any physical devices which get connected to the system after boot, so long as all of the PVs are present, and lvmetad and udev are running. When the LVM ...


3

You want to edit the 'filter' value in /etc/lvm/lvm.conf to inspect only the physical devices on the KVM host; the default value accepts 'every block device' which includes LVs themselves. The comment above the default value is fairly comprehensive and can do a better job of explaining usage than I can.


2

Revised answer: LXC containers share the same kernel as the host, so any filesystem they mount should be accessible from outside. If you do a cat /proc/mounts on the host, can you see the container filesystems? If you see a line like /dev/mapper/... /var/lib/lxc/o1/rootfs ext4 ... then you should be able to access /var/lib/lxc/o1/rootfs from the host, ...


0

For md3 it reports "Creation Time : Wed Mar 4 01:03:28 2015", that seems rather recent to be the true creation date. Perhaps a recreate was done? In any case where this is RAID1 you should be able to run testdisk against one of the partitions and let it search for a filesystem. Try... testdisk /dev/sda3 Note in data recovery situations it is a mistake ...


0

You can use pvmove to move around the allocated physical extents on the physical volume(s). You should make any logical volumes begin and end on extent boundaries (grow with lvresize). The underlying physical volume size(s) should probably also be an exact multiple of the new extent size too (fix that with pvresize). As mentioned in a superuser answer to a ...


0

The issue is that since this is a VM there is a partition from the image now transfered to the LVM. When mounting the LVM locally, you need to mount with an offset. You need to obtain the start of your partition within the disk. This will print out your partitions. Take the start # of your boot partition. parted -s /dev/vg00/oes2 unit s print example: ...


0

I've done extensive testing on KVM and caching performance (you can read here, here and here) and many of the recommendation that you find on the Internet is obsolete of plain wrong. But let's proceed one step at a time... RAID5 needs a much smaller chunk size (in the order of 32-64K) than yours (512K, as seen from pastebin) and a BBU (for writeback ...


1

I know this is an old thread, but I'm not sure why the other answer links to a bug report. Unfortunately LVM does a really bad job of explaining why it's saying it's out of space, but you can prevent this altogether with adding "--mirrorlog core" to the end of your lvconvert line. This will keep the log in memory instead of writing it to disk. Big ...


0

If you have limited space available, you should not over-fragment it in multiple LVs. You can create a single large "data" LV and use it to store all user/application data. If you need to mount that single LV in multiple directories, you have two options: mount it under a single location (eg: /mnt/data) and use symlinks to point to it; mount it under a ...


0

I am not sure if you can do this with Hetzner's automatic install script. AFAIK any SWRAID configuration on this script will use the first disks which is not what you want. Personally I would simply install the OS on sda without configuring any RAID. Then after installation is complete and the OS booted I would manually create the partitions and RAID1 on ...



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