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disclaimer: you should read lvm manual carefully and understand what each step does. however, there should be very little risk unless you encounter errors. this is what I do usually i this case. if there is a chance that someone else might do something to mess you up, you want to block any login while doing the maintenance (touch /etc/nologin etc. per your ...


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I'd check the following in order Verify HBA adapters on second servers are connected to Brocade switch(s). Verify WWPN's from 2nd server are logged into Brocade switch ports. Verify HBA WWPN's on second server are zoned correctly in Brocade switch(s). Verify WWPN's from 2nd server are visible from DS8000. Verify LUN's on DS8000 are assigned to the correct ...


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There are some late_command examples in the Ubuntu Forums, the proposed example is based on one. But first, two points: 1) Automating an install that forces formatting of one file system while preserving another is inherently dangerous. If you don't back up before proceeding, you will lose data. "Maybe not today. Maybe not tomorrow, but soon, and for the ...


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Since the two disks are exactly the same size and need to contain exactly the same data, you could use dd: dd if=/dev/sdb of=/dev/sda bs=16M You'll need to boot from a live use though. Please check the if(in file) and of(out file) statements from the live usb. Once you start dd(disk destroyer), there's no going back.


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Answering my own question. The command recreatevg can be used after the PVIDs are cleared and new PVIDs assigned. All of the devices part of the volume group must be passed as part of the argument and the name of volume group can be given. recreatevg -y new_vgname hdiskX hdiskY hdiskZ


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you can try lsblk command which shows the Logical Volume used by respective dev-mapper. # lsblk NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT sda 8:0 0 8G 0 disk ├─sda1 8:1 0 500M 0 part /boot └─sda2 8:2 0 7.5G 0 part ├─vg_root-lv_root (dm-0) 253:0 0 ...


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Rsync / Rsnapshot are way better tools for this kind of work, especially considering that they give you a "live" snapshot directory where inconsistencies will be limited to some file at most, but they can't bring down the entire backup. Moreover, using hard links, you can have an incremental backup without the inconveniences associated to it. I used this ...


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As above with hardware RAID it really depends on the RAID card and the options it supports. Whatever you do though if you start messing around with the RAID config make sure you have a verified backup just in case it goes wrong.


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This is most likely possible, though it depends on how you've implemented RAID. If you're using Linux software RAID (e.g. mdadm), live RAID type conversions are definitely possible. If you're using hardware RAID in a server, most modern RAID controllers support live RAID type conversions... Though you'd want to check the user manual for the particular ...


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Sometimes the relevant documentation is hidden away in configuration files rather than in, say, the documentation. So it seems with LVM. By default LVM will automatically attempt to activate volumes on any physical devices which get connected to the system after boot, so long as all of the PVs are present, and lvmetad and udev (or more recently systemd) are ...


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You want to edit the 'filter' value in /etc/lvm/lvm.conf to inspect only the physical devices on the KVM host; the default value accepts 'every block device' which includes LVs themselves. The comment above the default value is fairly comprehensive and can do a better job of explaining usage than I can.



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