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23

Yes, Ctrl-aq, should work by default, however no, lxc-console does not actually use screen to accomplish its console behavior. In fact, you might be encountering a conflict if you are using screen since it also uses Ctrl-a as a prefix. If you're inside screen but don't realize it then you'll need to type Ctrl-a a q since the default behavior of screen is ...


21

I'm going to dispel a few myths here. This is just a bad idea. I'm sorry. – Jacob Mar 5 at 20:30 I don't see how this is a bad idea. It's really just a chroot inside a chroot. On one hand, it could possibly decrease performance in some negligible manner (nothing compared to running a VM inside a VM). On the other hand, it's likely to be more secure ...


18

Let's use their respective web pages to find out what are all these projects about. I'll change the order in which you listed, though: Chef: Chef is an automation platform that transforms infrastructure into code. This is a configuration management software. Most of them use the same paradigm: they allow you to define the state you want a machine to be, ...


17

If by "Plain English" you mean untechnical people, the difference can't be explained easily. That hair is too fine to split without very careful consideration. If by "Plain English" you mean managerial types who talk to technical people, and thus have at least a passing understanding of technical topics, I submit the following verbage: It is a different ...


12

First of all i would like you to understand Cgroups that are a part of the LXC utility. when you have a container, you would obviously want to ensure that the various containers you have running done starve any other container or process within. With this in mind, the nice guy of the LXC project a.k.a Daniel Lezcano integrated cgroups with the container ...


11

Let's assume that your own IP is 192.168.1.1, your gateway is 192.168.1.254 and your network is 192.168.1.0/24. You should make a bridged interface on your host machine, like this in /etc/network/interfaces file auto lo iface lo inet loopback auto br0 iface br0 inet static address 192.168.1.1 network 192.168.1.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 ...


9

Red Hat is making a huge containerization push. They're building an entire new product, Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host, around it. For a less radical approach, take a look at their RHEL7 beta Resource Management and Linux Containers Guide; you'll notice it pushes libvirt-lxc and makes no mention of the lxc tools.


8

Edit: I'll keep my original answer below, but I'll try to explain what's happening here and provide a general solution for you. Edit 2: Provided another option. The problem that you're hitting here has to do with how the kernel manages I/O. When you make a write to your filesystem, that write isn't immediately committed to disk; that would be incredibly ...


8

There's nothing exactly like Linux containers in the Windows world. App-V is probably the closest you'll get.


7

On the reference installation (only once): dpkg-query -W -f='${Package}\n' | sort > baselist.txt (The following assumes bash) To get the packages added from the reference installation (this doesn't show what was removed): comm -1 -3 baselist.txt <(dpkg-query -W -f='${Package}\n' | sort) Even better, avoiding copy of baselist.txt: comm -1 -3 ...


7

Here's an Ubuntu page that shows that you can run in under KVM - https://help.ubuntu.com/community/LXC --additional info-- I've just completed live implementation of LXC under VMware VSphere, as part of it I did a couple of Proof of Concepts that implemented LXC under KVM and VirtualBox as well here's the link: ...


7

What's the conventional wisdom regarding LXC and RHEL-like systems today? Personally, I find the current setup somewhat lacking. LXC seems more at the forefront -- certainly more maintained. How are you implementing them? In terms of offering it as a virtualization option I am not. I find the current technological setup lacking. No username ...


6

Kernel integration isn't just about addressing a desirable feature, but more about making minimally intrusive changes with little downside in the way of performance, code quality, complexity, and future compatibility. Politics are also involved on both sides, and a good relationship with established developers helps get long term commitment and constructive ...


6

It is possible to run a different distribution, but the kernel that's being used, has to be the same. So if your Debian and ubuntu use the same kernel or can work with the same kernel, there shouldn't be a problem. I don't know however if 12.04 can support the latest lenny kernel (it's pretty dated and support has been dropped for lenny by debian).


6

I'm not familiar with lxc, but try the following commands: # mkdir /dev/net # mknod /dev/net/tun c 10 200 # chmod 666 /dev/net/tun


5

To the best knowledge at the time of this writing there were still critical issues with /proc filtering. They ought to be addressed in Linux Kernel 3.6 or later. Since I'm facing the same problem as you I've done some investigation and I'm not yet convinced that LXC is an alternative to Linux VServer. If you decide not to switch to LXC have a look at the ...


5

Linux Containers (LXC) are an operating system-level virtualization method for running multiple isolated server installs (containers) on a single control host. LXC does not provide a virtual machine, but rather provides a virtual environment that has its own process and network space. It is similar to a chroot, but offers much more isolation. Linux ...


5

The -s flags selects only that traffic that matches the host or network specified. If you want to match all traffic except that, use ! -s 10.0.3.0/24 and don't forget to escape that ! from the shell with either quotes or a backslash.


4

Yes, an LXC container is some config files and a directory within the whole server. If you copy this directory and config files and adjust the parameters you can use it as a template. Just tar it and untar it to the new machine's directory.


4

You're writing about Linux containers (LXC). You have the ability to assign a static IP address in the container's configuration file. Here's an example from my environment: lxc.utsname = MPG_Web lxc.tty = 4 lxc.network.type = veth lxc.network.flags = up lxc.network.link = br0 lxc.network.name = eth0 lxc.network.mtu = 1500 lxc.network.ipv4 = 172.16.16.110 ...


4

Direct mounting is not possible, you should mount the share to the host first and then use lxc.mount.entry configuration directive to bind mount share's mountpoint inside the container (an example of using lxc.mount.entry can be found here). You can also provide the container with an external fstab file as shown here.


4

Glad to see you found the answer to your original question, however a better way to make your change permanent is to use sysctl instead of writing to /proc directly since that is the standard way to configure kernel parameters at runtime so they are set correctly at next boot: # cat >> /etc/sysctl.d/99-bridge-nf-dont-pass.conf <<EOF ...


4

If Oracle Express is suitable for you: Download Oracle XE 11g rpm. Convert rpm to deb using alien. "Extract" the deb package using dpkg-deb command. Modify the deb scripts: Change [ "$1" != "1" ] to [ "$1" != "install" ] at the beginning of preinst. Change [ "$1" = "1" -o -z "$2" ] to [ "$1" = "configure" -a -z "$2" ] at the beginning of postint. Change [ ...


4

Your error is here: Cannot initiate the connection to archive.ubuntu.com:80 (2001:67c:1360:8c01::19). connect (101: Network is unreachable) [IP: 2001:67c:1360:8c01::19 80] This isn't an error with DNS, instead your system is trying to connect to IPv6 hosts and failing . Presumably because you don't have IPv6 access on your host. The actual lookup of ...


4

A netinstall is really minimal, you simply add what you need instead of getting a common denominator which includes stuff you may not need, a good thing really. The lxc version of 0.8 is also correct for Debian stable, Wheezy. More recent versions of packages require a different release such as testing (jessie provides lxc 1.0.6-3), or unstable (sid ...


4

It actually sounds like you stumbled across a bug. The referenced link directs to a patch which helps prevent these AppArmor failures. However, you'll need to know how to compile LXC from source to make use of it. I'm not sure if this patch made it into the binaries as of yet.


3

With Ubuntu 14.04 (trusty) you can simply add the following in the parent container config: lxc.mount.auto = cgroup lxc.aa_profile = lxc-container-default-with-nesting reference: https://help.ubuntu.com/lts/serverguide/lxc.html#lxc-basic-usage (search for "nesting) Make sure that you have pre-configured network before booting to avoid an long pause ...


3

LXC is a means by which to isolate systems/processes at the kernel. The system is locked in a "container" so that it cannot interact with anything outside of that container. Thus the name Linux Containers. It could be useful for many things, one of which would be to isolate services running on a machine. If one of these services is compromised, the host ...


3

The canonical creator of these files is "makedev". It does have a man page. Makedev, however, simply creates symlinks to /proc/self/fd/2 for /dev/stderr.


3

Maybe tcp wrappers works for you. fail2ban can manage /etc/hosts.allow and /etc/hosts.deny files



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