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You probably figured it out already, but that seems to be a limitation of LXC containers, at least for now. From the pct man page : <size> \+?\d+(\.\d+)?[KMGT]? The new size. With the + sign the value is added to the actual size of the volume and without it, the value is taken as an absolute one. Shrinking disk size is not supported. ...


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If this particular case, the high IO usage was being caused by a cron job executing a set of chmod and chown commands on a regular basis. On a non-virtual host, these commands were executed much faster, but inside the virtual host, these commands were much much slower to execute and caused high disk wait times. By removing these set of commands, performance ...


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A native port of the Docker daemon for Windows is available for Windows 10 from WinDocks. A free downloadable Community Edition is available at WinDocks


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If by "enabled" you mean to have a full fledged SELinux policy within the container, the answer is no. Of course the host where the containers are deployed can have SELinux enforced, and the processes within the container can be confined as well. This confinement operates from the host server point of view. There is support for sVirt MCS/MLS confinement ...


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Your external access on IPv6 may be restricted to a single IP address. Normally you would be provided with one or more /64 subnets for internal use. These would be advertised by one or more radvd servers on your local network. You will need to check with your IP provider to see what mechanism to use, and which subnets are assigned to you. IPv6 clients ...


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You are redirecting all the tcp/80 traffic with your rule. In order to redirect only the traffic you want, you have to specify an interface or an ip address. For example, you could use instead: -A PREROUTING -i $MY_WAN_INTERFACE -p tcp --dport 80 -j REDIRECT --to-port 8080 Or, if you need to redirect some of your LAN traffic aswell, you could write: -A ...


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If stuff is not in the repos of your desired distro but you still want to run applications/services on top of it, you are in for trouble (read: extra work to keep things running at all) sooner or later. If things are different (because-you-know-what-you-are-doing(tm)), you will know wheter a technology is safe to use for you or not. For now you should ...


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I would suggest to keep the system as is but take measures to counter any potential security issue due to leaving it on debian squeeze. However, at the same time set up a fresh debian stable system with LXC containers and then slowly migrate things over after testing it out. If that is not practical then I believe you can upgrade to wheezy (debian 7) and ...



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