Hot answers tagged

11

I prefer postfix, it's easier to configure and by default, most things are turned off: Install postfix. In /etc/postfix/main.cf set these two options mydomain = example.com mydestination = example.com Replace "example.com" with your actual domain. This is very important Optionally in main.cf, set myhostname to something appropriate (could also be ...


8

If root is receiving email, then you probably already have a server installed. $ sudo dpkg-reconfigure postfix If this gets an error, $ sudo apt-get install postfix (Re)configure to either deliver directly or use a smarthost. Now add "root: user@example.com" (with the correct address, of course) to /etc/aliases and run newaliases. (I think the Ubuntu ...


7

You'll need a mail server installed on your node, yes. Postfix, exim, and sendmail are my preferences (in that order.) Note that some mail servers are a bit picky about who they accept mail from. If it's your local mail server, the restrictions are often done by network so you might not have a problem. If it's gmail, for example, you'll have to make sure ...


6

I see two solutions here. (i did configuration like this many years ago) google use many ip's as MX. You can define in transport map, that first mail is routed via gmail-smtp-in.l.google.com., and second via alt1.gmail-smtp-in.l.google.com. Then - using iptables and nat/POSTROUTING - nat connections to first google MX via first ip, and to second google MX ...


5

Remove the example.com from mydestination as mail to domains in that list is delivered via the $local_transport mail delivery transport. This is so common mistake it is separately warned in Postfix main.cf file format documentation of parameter mydestination: Warnings: Do not specify the names of virtual domains - those domains are specified ...


4

Perhaps they want you to use the Groups feature whereas support@example.com would be a group address with employee@example.com (and whomever else) as a member of that group. http://www.google.com/support/a/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=33329


4

The forwarding server needs to setup SRS in order not to break your SPF http://www.openspf.org/SRS


4

The receiving mail system cannot tell the difference between forwarded spam and real spam. If you forward email, you always have the huge risk of blacklist unless you control the receiving mail system as well. This happens often with web hosting accounts forwarding the email for a domain to Gmail, Yahoo, Hotmail, Aol, etc. You can either constantly fight ...


4

Top tip: just don't do this. It won't take long, then you'll have this situation: Spammer sends spam to user1@mydomain.com You forward it to user1@gmail.com GMail sees spam from you and adds you to their list of people who send spam You don't get to send any mail to GMail any more until you change what you're doing I've been there and done that. In ...


4

Instead putting me@example.com in transport_maps, you can skip that step and use virtual_alias_maps directly. # transport maps example.com :[mail.provider.com] .example.com :[mail.provider.com] # virtual alias maps me@example.com me@me.com Virtual alias maps is special mapping in postfix that overrides email aliasing regardless their domain ...


4

My recommendation is to change the envelope sender on the auto-reply sent at step (2) of your flow. It is this envelope sender address, which will receive any error messages at step (3). You can use an empty envelope sender at step (2). That will prevent the error message being generated at step (3). In the SMTP session it would look like this: MAIL ...


3

When it says sh: mail: not found, it's telling you that it's trying to send mail using a command called mail, and you don't have it installed. Generally, this is a link to another program called mailx. On CentOS/Fedora/RHEL: yum -y install mailx On Debian/Ubuntu: aptitude install bsd-mailx


3

I figured this out. Basically I need to modify the mysql table that saves the aliases so that it supports multiple aliases per address, making it possible to have delivery setup for both the local domain and a remote email. This works so far, though I've heard that some people attempting this have gotten duplicate emails to the forwarded email account. So ...


3

What are you expecting it to do? You seem to expect the virtual_address_pipe transport to be called, but the aliasfile example you give doesn't have any pipe aliases in them... omigosh... I just reread your question for the 20th time. I got distracted by the fact that what you are describing doesn't quite gel with your example, since a redirect to ...


3

If mysender.com is only sending mail and not receiving it, it should not have any mx records on your domain. (Delete the 20 & 30 MX records). Additionally, mydomain.com referenced in your mx record MUST HAVE AN A Record, a cname record will cause problems with mail delivery. Finally, if the other users in your domain do not receive mail from ...


3

Exim is delivering locally because the destination domain matches one that you've configured Exim to consider local. Smarthosting doesn't come into it, because that only kicks in once Exim's decided to route the e-mail somewhere else, and that's not what's happening. The easiest way to handle this just to grep through your Exim config for your domain, and ...


3

You need to create mail contact. Step by step instructions. For the sake of full answer here's a cut-and-paste from the liink: Create a MailContact using the EMC: Expand Recipeint Configuration | Mail Contact In the Action pane, click New Mail Contact To create a new Contact object, leave the default (New Contact) selected | click Next ...


3

Do you already have a functioning incoming mail server? Have you setup MX records for you domain yet? Set up mx records in DNS Install sendmail Set up /etc/mail/virtusertable with the following forwarding line: emailaddress@mydomain.com otheremail@gmail.com


3

This is actually a Gmail feature, A message sent from GMail that is (somehow) forwarded back to the sending account is considered a duplicate, and does not show up in the inbox. I don't think it's documented anywhere, but it appears to have been discussed on Gmail support forums.


3

You set your virtual_alias_maps to a file: postconf -e virtual_alias_maps=hash:/etc/postfix/virtual Then you put in the file: user@mydomain.com myCheapGmailAccount@gmail.com you need to active the change now: postmap hash:/etc/postfix/virtual That is all.


3

As is so often the case, the answer is "it depends". Primarily, it depends on how it's done. If you just do simple forwarding, and google makes any kind of reception / spam filtering / blacklist decision based on SPF, you'll break mail from every sender who advertises an SPF record ending -all (which is anyone who actually knows how to use SPF; see eg ...


3

It turns out that this is actually an issue (feature?) on Google's end. If you send email from an address that automatically forwards back to you (eg. user@mydomain.com -> user@gmail.com) it will NOT appear in your inbox and only appear in your Sent Mail folder. This is apparently to prevent multiples of the same message appearing in your inbox (ie. if you ...


3

Just do what you start in alias file - without renaming:-) buz: baz@otherdomain.com, buz If alias is expand to self then it is not expanded in loop again but skipped, so mail be forwarded outside and delivered locally. (See Exim documentation ).


3

If I understood your problem correctly I think you can do it configuring luser_relay on linux.example.com. Set in main.cf luser_relay = = $user@windows.example.com http://www.postfix.org/postconf.5.html#luser_relay If you don't have an MX record for domain windows.example.com and you don't want to create one you can use transport on linux.example.com ...


3

with the wizard in MS Outlook creating rules is trivial. One rule for all messages with an attachment: A second rule for all messages, except those with attachments:


3

Assuming you are working with Exchange mailboxes (it's not terribly clear in your question) Set-Mailbox is your best friend. You're going to need a for-each loop to retrieve the user's attributes and properly set the destination SMTP address. If you have a whole OU of users to apply changes to, use something like: Get-Mailbox -OrganizationalUnit ...


3

You've done some digging, and found that the original outbound email was sent through your server. That means that, unusually in such cases, you weren't joe-jobbed. Digging through the logs has shown that the user in question authenticated to send email from Orange Slovakia, which will most likely be a mobile connection. You should ask this user why he's ...


2

Exchange 2003 will detect a forwarding loop and squash it. I'm assuming that this behavior has been carried forward (pun intended) in Exchange 2007. My suggestion would be to create an Outlook rule in each mailbox that forwards email with the exception that it not forward email recieved from the other recipient (meaning email from you to Mike gets forwarded ...


2

It seems that you are looking for Dan Bernstein's mini-qmail, Bruce Guenter's nullmailer, or similar.



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