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7

I prefer postfix, it's easier to configure and by default, most things are turned off: Install postfix. in /etc/postfix/main.cf set mydomain = mydomain.com and mydestination = mydomain.com (replace "mydomain.com" with your actual domain). This is very important optionally in main.cf, set myhostname to something appropriate (could also be "mydomain.com") ...


5

You'll need a mail server installed on your node, yes. Postfix, exim, and sendmail are my preferences (in that order.) Note that some mail servers are a bit picky about who they accept mail from. If it's your local mail server, the restrictions are often done by network so you might not have a problem. If it's gmail, for example, you'll have to make sure ...


4

Perhaps they want you to use the Groups feature whereas support@example.com would be a group address with employee@example.com (and whomever else) as a member of that group. http://www.google.com/support/a/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=33329


4

If root is receiving email, then you probably already have a server installed. $ sudo dpkg-reconfigure postfix If this gets an error, $ sudo apt-get install postfix (Re)configure to either deliver directly or use a smarthost. Now add "root: user@example.com" (with the correct address, of course) to /etc/aliases and run newaliases. (I think the Ubuntu ...


4

The receiving mail system cannot tell the difference between forwarded spam and real spam. If you forward email, you always have the huge risk of blacklist unless you control the receiving mail system as well. This happens often with web hosting accounts forwarding the email for a domain to Gmail, Yahoo, Hotmail, Aol, etc. You can either constantly fight ...


3

If mysender.com is only sending mail and not receiving it, it should not have any mx records on your domain. (Delete the 20 & 30 MX records). Additionally, mydomain.com referenced in your mx record MUST HAVE AN A Record, a cname record will cause problems with mail delivery. Finally, if the other users in your domain do not receive mail from ...


3

When it says sh: mail: not found, it's telling you that it's trying to send mail using a command called mail, and you don't have it installed. Generally, this is a link to another program called mailx. On CentOS/Fedora/RHEL: yum -y install mailx On Debian/Ubuntu: aptitude install bsd-mailx


3

The forwarding server needs to setup SRS in order not to break your SPF http://www.openspf.org/SRS


3

What are you expecting it to do? You seem to expect the virtual_address_pipe transport to be called, but the aliasfile example you give doesn't have any pipe aliases in them... omigosh... I just reread your question for the 20th time. I got distracted by the fact that what you are describing doesn't quite gel with your example, since a redirect to ...


3

Exim is delivering locally because the destination domain matches one that you've configured Exim to consider local. Smarthosting doesn't come into it, because that only kicks in once Exim's decided to route the e-mail somewhere else, and that's not what's happening. The easiest way to handle this just to grep through your Exim config for your domain, and ...


3

You need to create mail contact. Step by step instructions. For the sake of full answer here's a cut-and-paste from the liink: Create a MailContact using the EMC: Expand Recipeint Configuration | Mail Contact In the Action pane, click New Mail Contact To create a new Contact object, leave the default (New Contact) selected | click Next ...


3

You set your virtual_alias_maps to a file: postconf -e virtual_alias_maps=hash:/etc/postfix/virtual Then you put in the file: user@mydomain.com myCheapGmailAccount@gmail.com you need to active the change now: postmap hash:/etc/postfix/virtual That is all.


3

You are looking for an MTA like postfix or exim. Use any decent MTA. The fact that your server will not host the mailboxes itself but forward all mail to external servers should not influence much your choice: You just won't have to install additionnal software like pop server or webmail. You can look at /etc/aliases to forward mail.


3

It turns out that this is actually an issue (feature?) on Google's end. If you send email from an address that automatically forwards back to you (eg. user@mydomain.com -> user@gmail.com) it will NOT appear in your inbox and only appear in your Sent Mail folder. This is apparently to prevent multiples of the same message appearing in your inbox (ie. if you ...


3

Just do what you start in alias file - without renaming:-) buz: baz@otherdomain.com, buz If alias is expand to self then it is not expanded in loop again but skipped, so mail be forwarded outside and delivered locally. (See Exim documentation ).


3

If I understood your problem correctly I think you can do it configuring luser_relay on linux.example.com. Set in main.cf luser_relay = = $user@windows.example.com http://www.postfix.org/postconf.5.html#luser_relay If you don't have an MX record for domain windows.example.com and you don't want to create one you can use transport on linux.example.com ...


2

Exchange 2003 will detect a forwarding loop and squash it. I'm assuming that this behavior has been carried forward (pun intended) in Exchange 2007. My suggestion would be to create an Outlook rule in each mailbox that forwards email with the exception that it not forward email recieved from the other recipient (meaning email from you to Mike gets forwarded ...


2

It seems that you are looking for Dan Bernstein's mini-qmail, Bruce Guenter's nullmailer, or similar.


2

If MX records are not present the delivery falls back to the A record.


2

Use a wildcard search 'lsearch*' instead of 'lsearch'. This will match the wildcards. domain_aliases: driver = redirect domains = dsearch;/etc/exim4/fwd_domains data = ${lookup{$local_part}lsearch*{/etc/exim4/fwd_domains/$domain}} no_more Alternatively you can put your aliases in /etc/aliases and use a router like this. You can change the domains ...


2

In any case, it seems like you need a final dot "." at the end of you MX records, whatever the previous advice may be: mydomain.com MX 3600 [10] mydomain.com. mydomain.com MX 3600 [20] smtp2.mysender.com. mydomain.com MX 3600 [30] inbound.mysender.com.


2

If you have configured your mail server to forward all messages to another domain, the mail server would have to receive the whole message so it can pass it on. This happens normally with email traffic anyway - your message passes through multiple SMTP servers until it is routed to its final destination (you can see each SMTP server an email passes through ...


2

The whole mail is received and forwarded on. The mail transport protocol is called "Simple Mail Transport Protocol" for a reason.


2

Have you considered setting up Google Apps for your domain?http://www.google.com/apps/intl/en/group/index.html It'll guide you through the process and it might be a bit more solid than what you've got.


2

You should only be publishing MX records for the MTA you want mail sent to. And in addition to the MX to hostname record you also need an address record for the host. You don't add MX records for hosts you send mail from. You should however publish SPF records - which include all the hosts/domains you send mail from


2

In the default configuration Postfix is already configured to deliver mails to all accounts in /etc/passwd and all aliases in /etc/aliases: http://www.postfix.org/postconf.5.html#local_recipient_maps Otherwise you can set the local_recipient_maps to the default value.


2

Why are you sending Spam to AOL? Or better: Why are you forwarding mails to AOL? As you do send Spam to AOL they are totally correct to identify you as a Spam source. The only thing AOL can rely on is the IP that delivers mail to them. They don't rely on the Received line(s) in the message header. Why should they?


2

It does look like it's being delivered to Google, is it appearing in the spam mailbox? As the recipient is the same as the sender Google may decide that it's a spoofed sender, and being a VPS IP will only add to the score. So try adding your mail server's IP to email whitelist (under "Settings > Email" in GApps admin panel). Also ensure you have a SPF ...


2

Do you already have a functioning incoming mail server? Have you setup MX records for you domain yet? Set up mx records in DNS Install sendmail Set up /etc/mail/virtusertable with the following forwarding line: emailaddress@mydomain.com otheremail@gmail.com


2

It depends on the type of forwarder. If it's a naive forwarder, then if there's a delivery error with the forwarded mail, the error will go to the original sender, thus leaking the destination address of the forwarded email. If it's a remailer, then no. Think about it this way: What do you think should happen if the final destination of your email cannot ...



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