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9

As mentioned, you have user policy settings being set to computer accounts. By default, this won't work. You can get it working this way by enabling Loopback mode processing on the policy you are creating to process the settings for users logging into those computers. Loopback Processing will allow the user policy settings to be applied on a policy applied ...


8

You're running into a design-limitation of Offline Files. It is a per-machine cache, enabled and disabled at a per-machine level. Offline Files limits visibility of items to users who are authorized to view them, but there is a single cache on the machine. You can't disable the caching functionality for just certain users on a machine. There just isn't a ...


7

If you don't have Computer Configuration\Administrative Templates\System\Logon\Always wait for the network at computer startup and logon configured in your GPO, it's possible that your computer boots and you log in with cached credentials before the NIC is up and has obtained an address. Then, by the time you get around to opening Explorer, you've got an ...


6

Use the UNC path when specifying the destination-- the SQL Agent doesn't have a concept of "mapped" "drives". Also, SQL Agent typically runs as "Local Service" or "Local System" and, as such, doesn't have rights to remote shares on other computers. You have a couple of choices: Run SQL Agent as a role account in the domain. Grant that account permission ...


6

You can specify the user's name as an environment variable in the destination path. See this Group Policy Team blog entry for specific details.


6

You might try enabling "Always wait for the network at computer startup and logon" via a group policy or manually with gpedit.msc. The setting is in Computer Configuration\Administrative Templates\System\Logon. More info can be found here and here.


6

Are your users local admin of their workstations? If so, they may have installed a shell extension that is interfering with Explorer. Try installing this: http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/shexview.html and disabling anything that looks unnecessary. (Disclaimer: Never used this tool myself, but have seen various Windowsy people recommend it). You could also ...


6

You have a user policy being bound to a computer OU. The settings need to match up to the contents of the OU they are bound to.


5

As has been mentioned by several different people the best way to do this would be to sit down and sort out the shares to the point you only have a handful of drives. There is an added impetus to doing this in that new computers come with 4-in-1, 5-in-1, etc. card readers which whilst useful swallow up drive letters. In the end we decided that all drive ...


5

Open a command prompt and type: net use and press enter. That will list all active drive mappings.


4

User Profile Home folder mapping (active directory): Right-click the account you wish to modify and select 'Properties' Click the 'Profile' tab and choose 'Connect:' under the 'Home folder' section User Profile Home folder mapping (local system): Right-click 'My Computer' Select 'Manage' Expand 'Local Users and Groups' and open the 'Users' folder ...


4

to disconnect, use: net use Z: /d Windows will not try to re-connect the drive when logging on again (unless the drive is actually being connected in a logon script or similar, of course).


4

We use Ninotech's Path Copy which is a shell extension that allows you to right-click on an item and do all kinds of cool things. Copying long UNC paths is among them. Unfortunately, getting a user to realize when to use a UNC path (beyond even knowing what it really is) is a different story...


4

You could also look into DFS, which lets you construct a "virtual" folder structure from shares all over, and present them together so you'll only need one mapped drive letter. DFS is a component in Windows 2000 Server and newer, and you'll need a dfs-aware client, which WIndows 2000 and newer has builtin. Win NT4 and Win98 has (or at least had) a ...


4

check out Autofs: Automatically Mounting Network File Shares in Mac OS X


4

Ah, sounds like an ex-NetWare shop. They were always fond of drive letters. Windows doesn't track where they come from, unfortunately, so you're left with the forensic task of looking at everything that can cause a script to be mapped. That's a long slog, and I feel for you. There are many: GPO direct maps GPO indirect maps through scripts Local ...


4

You're losing them completely, or they are temporarily disconnected? Win7 I believe has a timeout that will disconnect unused shares (puts an X on My Computer) but reconnects when you try to use the share again. If you're mapping over the VPN, it could be that your VPN isn't forwarding certain packets needed to keep the connection alive, or it could be a ...


4

Net use [drive letter] [unc path] example: net use z: \\servername\share$


4

It seems drive mapping doesn't like trailing slashes on the UNC path! Took me 3 days to figure this out the hard way.


3

I totally agree with both answers about UNC path. I would also like to add that even with mapped drives you have a simple workaround. You can execute a backup to any of normal drives of your server. And then you can add xp_cmdshell 'XCOPY [source] [destination] \flags' SQL command to the job or SQL script you run. With xp_cmdshell you can do even more ...


3

Probably because the TCP connection was broken after the router reboot, so the SMB connection that underlies the mapped drive needs to be reestablished. If the router is rebooted on a regular schedule, you could always create a scheduled task on the first server that runs a simple batch file which deletes and then reestablishes the drive mapping after the ...


3

Pathworks for OpenVMS (if installed on VMS) provides integration with active directory. Security can be controlled with inter-domain trusts (Windows side) and ACLs with HOSTMAPs that map active directory names to OpenVMS accounts. You could limit the capabilities of the relevant OpenVMS accounts to match any security policy. OpenVMS files can have varying ...


3

Samba is the canonical system used to do this on Unix-like systems and did support VMS at one point. However I'm not sure that it still does in the main trunk - you could try an older version. Directories can be shared from the VMS server via the samba server or mounted off a Windows machine via smbmount. If you don't want to compile your own version, HP ...


3

Do like this with the psexec utility: Open an elevated cmd.exe prompt (Run as administrator). Then, do psexec -i -s cmd.exe. You are now "nt authority\system" :) Now, all you have to do is net use z: \servername\sharedfolder /persistent:yes Keep in mind if you need to delete the mapped drive you will have to do it in the same way (instead doing net use z: ...


3

Persistant drive mappings are only restored during an interactive login, which the service does not use. I believe the only way to get a service to use a network drive is for that service to map the drive itself or alternatively for it to us a UNC path instead of a mapped drive.


3

My coworker and I hacked together this script GetNetworkPath. It basically translates a path on a shared drive to a file:// URL and escapes everything so the URL can be passed around in an email. When installed, a item 'GetNetworkPath' is added to the context menu for all files and folders. When you click it, a dialog box pops up that you can copy and ...


3

Here's a helpful hint re: those error messages: If you ever need to diagnose error messages from the "NET" command, just go a "NET HELPMSG ". Like, for example: C:\Documents and Settings\w00tw00tw00t>net helpmsg 5 Access is denied. C:\Documents and Settings\w00tw00tw00t> So, you're getting an "Access is denied". What's the share you're trying to ...


3

The option I'd use is sitting down to remap the shares, even though it's a pain at first it should make things a lot easier down the road. If it's a storage issue I'd recommend getting a huge NAS or SAN on which to store things and that way it should also make creating backups a little easier. Otherwise you're going to have nagging problems with Joe getting ...


3

Ouch. There are a number of ways that this could be improved from a number-of-mapped-drives point of view, with things like junction points, DFS or exotically-mounted drives, but all you'd be doing is prolonging the inevitable point where you're going to have to sit down and sort it all out, as Bart says. If it's any help, we rationalised our drive mapping ...


3

This problem had been giving me significant grief with a number of automated scripts that would just plain fail when the network mapping wouldn't be re-established. Instead I went back and altered a number of scripts to use the UNC long path format instead of a mapped drive - this solved my problems without actually resolving the problems with drive ...



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