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6

172.16.199.228 is the network address. You need to use 172.16.199.229 or .230 Output of ipcalc: Address: 172.16.199.228 10101100.00010000.11000111.111001 00 Netmask: 255.255.255.252 = 30 11111111.11111111.11111111.111111 00 Wildcard: 0.0.0.3 00000000.00000000.00000000.000000 11 => Network: 172.16.199.228/30 ...


4

Specifically are same IP addresses with different masks LAN:192.168.1.1/24 and WAN:192.168.1.1/26 problematic from routing and NAT point of view and why ? Yes, this is a problem, for routing in general. Hosts on the LAN network will see the entire /24 as a CONNECTED route. Connected routes often have a special meaning, and can override more ...


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It is possible and not rare at all (of course, it will not change randomly, ISP can have multiple /but limited number of/ IP address blocks).


3

This isn't a situation I'd like, and the answer depends on your definition of "coexist". There cannot be hosts with the same address, i.e. if host A has address 192.168.3.5/16 and host B has 192.168.3.5/24 and they will try to live on the same Ethernet segment, they'll cause IP address conflicts. When you send a packet over IP network, you do not specify ...


2

There's nothing "wrong" with what you're seeing. How this Windows Server machine connects to these two networks doesn't say anything about the hosts on each network communicate with other networks. Consider: 192.168.0.1/16 192.168.3.1/24 v _________ v v | | v .--| Win Srv |--. __________ ...


2

I assume you are asking about consumer grade broadband, or other services without a static IP. The definitive answer will vary from provider to provider, but I know for a fact my home changes significantly. Just some examples of recent IP's my home router has picked up via DHCP from the ISP: 2.120.x.x 2.121.x.x 2.123.x.x 2.223.x.x 90.193.x.x 90.195.x.x ...


2

I'll try to clarify what I interpret as your source of confusion: An IPv4 address is a single 32 bit integer but it's not normally formatted that way when we write out an address. As I'm sure you are aware, the norm is to write the address as [first eight bits in decimal].[next eight bits in decimal].[next eight bits in decimal].[last eight bits in ...


2

For security reasons, browsers won't let you spoof the URL shown in the address bar. So, if you need the bar to show "subdomain.domain.com", then the browser will need to be talking to a machine at the IP address returned by resolving "subdomain.domain.com". If subdomain.domain.com and domain.com is being served on the same machine, then you could ...


2

Why can't I have the same subnet on WAN and LAN? Directly answering this question I have to say you can have it — merging LAN and WAN on layer 2, with Ethernet bridge technique, as most of SOHO Wi-Fi routers usually do, but this effectively collapses two different IP interfaces into single one, just wider. But since your direct question isn't the real ...


1

Untested: RewriteEngine on RewriteRule ^/?(.*) http://192.168.1.x/cgi-bin/foswiki/$1 By not using the "[R]" it should leave the URL alone in the browser's address bar.


1

Assuming Linux, using a group is one way to go here. Create a group containing both rawny and bawb-sftp, and use chgrp thatgroup /home/rawny/sftp (assuming starting with an empty directory, add an -R for recursive otherwise). Next, set both suid and sgid bits on the directory, and give both user and group rwx access: chmod 677? /home/rawny/sftp (replace ...


1

How about using chmod g+ws /web/foo? This sets the setgid and write bits on the directory, which makes all created files' groups to be apache in that directory, and allows all apache group users to write to that directory and create further directories inside it. And another thing that you need to do is to update your umask so that group has write ...


1

Some ISPs have different ip ranges. My home isp for example has range in the 86.61.0.0/17 range and 193.77.64.0/18 and a couple other which I cannot remember from the top of my head. So yes, it is possible to have different IPs from different ranges, since ISPs got them at different times, and different pools were free at the time. AFAIK, RIRs cannot get ...


1

From http://web.archive.org/web/20100821112028/http://www.3com.com/other/pdfs/infra/corpinfo/en_US/501302.pdf (page 14): "Defining Host Addresses for Each Subnet According to Internet practices, the host number field of an IP address cannot contain all 0-bits or all 1-bits. The all-0s host number identifies the base network (or subnetwork) number, while the ...


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It's more than a "possibility" of overlapping networks, it's a fact. There's no problem, though, because IP routing is smart enough to route packets to the most-specific route available, which does the right thing for you.


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Not via DNS. What you want is a URL redirect, possibly via HTTP.


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If you want to to simple go to the same ip address, then a simple CNAME will suffice. But I gather you want to actual redirect, so you will have to use http redirect. Through Bind/dns redirect is not possible. Since this is a simple catch all redirect then with apache it is a simple as these couple of lines: <VirtualHost *:80> ServerName ...


1

nginx isn't (directly) responsible for how links are rendered in your html pages. why not just use /foo instead of http://<some variable>/foo in your php files?


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If mod_proxy is turned on for the domain1 server, you can use the P flag along with mod_rewrite: RewriteRule ^path/that/uses/python/(.*)$ http://tr33house.domain2.school.edu/path/that/has/python/$1 [L,P] If there are things like redirects, and/or cookies that need their locations, paths, or domains rewritten, you can use mod_proxy's reverse directives: ...



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