Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

You'd be left with only half the capacity, so if the file system was more than half full already, it would be impossible. Even if there is sufficiently free space, the operation involves resizing the file system, which requires intimate knowledge of the file system. Moreover applying ordinary resizing tools to a degraded RAID5 before converting it to RAID1 ...


6

Yes, you can add as many mirrors to a RAID1 as you like, and you can tolerate failures of all but 1 device. If you add 10 devices, you can tolerate a failure of 9 devices. Don't forget there will be a write penalty for this setup though. All data has to be written to every device. Generally it should be fairly insignificant but if all devices are on the ...


3

Another solution is raid 6 with 3 disks. See this post: Minimum number of disks to implement RAID6 Raid 6 will also allow for doubling capacity by adding a fourth drive. I have had 2 drives fail on an array and not lost data.


3

To have a single array capable of 2-disk failure, you have two choices: three-way RAID1, as you suggested RAID6, as another possibility. What is the best choice? It depends of what you are trying to achieve. if you want a setup that give you the possibility of take out a disk, install it on another computer and still be capable of reading your data, ...


1

Absolutely do not try a similar thing without having a proper backup. I even discourage you to replace the broken disk without first taking a complete backup: if a second disk fails during reconstruction, you will be in troubles. So, first thing to do is to take a coherent backup of all your data. Then, if you really want RAID1 over RAID5, the safer bet is ...


1

disclaimer: you should read lvm manual carefully and understand what each step does. however, there should be very little risk unless you encounter errors. this is what I do usually i this case. if there is a chance that someone else might do something to mess you up, you want to block any login while doing the maintenance (touch /etc/nologin etc. per your ...


1

I tried all of the above tips. Even switching cables (power, SATA) didn't change the symptoms. The two disks connected to the add-on SATA controller kept being lost from the mdadm array, so I tried yet another SATA controller. No luck. I ended up rearranging the whole machine so I could live without the add-on SATA controller. The mdadm array has been stable ...


1

First, I think it's of importance to note the usage scenario and the quality of components used. It's not the same if you're using desktop HDDs and cheap raid controllers or going full enterprise hardware. If the only thing you're doing is replication across HDDs (RAID1) then you can afford to lose n-1 hard drives and still have all the data intact. But ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible