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7

MIBs (Management Information Base) describe OIDs (Object Identifiers) for SNMP. Which is acronym soup. An OID turns something like 1.3.6.1.4.1.412.2.1 Into dmtf.dmtfStdMifs.dmtfServiceLayerMIF This is useful for monitoring applications, as they know what they're looking at. MIBs also include definitions for the kind of data returned by a ...


6

As Nick R already mentioned, you need IF-MIB... details matter though. You can correlate all OIDs to an interface name below by snmp walking ifName: 1.3.6.1.2.1.31.1.1.1.1. High Speed interfaces For high-speed interfaces (100Mbps or above) you should use 64-bit counters if the device supports them: ifHCInOctets: 1.3.6.1.2.1.31.1.1.1.6 (64-bit Octets in ...


5

As PP said, there's no requirement that companies release their SNMP MIBs. Heck, they can even change their MIBs six times a year or keep them completely secret even from their own management as a "security precaution". If you want a MIB, you have to go find it yourself, whether it be from a public RFC, a generous FTP site like Cisco's, or by schmoozing a ...


4

If all you are trying to do is prove to the client that they are overloading the AP, you can use the dot11RetryCount and dot11MultipleRetryCount OID's. dot11RetryCount - 1.2.840.10036.2.2.1.4 dot11MultipleRetryCount - 1.2.840.10036.2.2.1.5 This will give you a rough estimate of how congested the air is. Once the Retry count reaches more than about 10% ...


4

There are publicly available databases like OIDView's MIB database but why don't you simply ask the manufacturer?


4

The real issue here is whether or not Brother has built support into the printer to report out actual toner levels via SNMP. Looking at vendor specific MIB's is a good way to get an idea of what kind of information is supported. Looking up Brother's MIB's - http://www.oidview.com/mibs/2435/BROTHER-MIB.html - we can see that they seem to only report out low ...


3

IF-MIB should be what you are looking for. The OID you want is ifInOctets and ifOutOctets.


3

MIB = Management Information Base A MIB is in essence a schema document describing the hierarchical structure of an SNMP tree. It provides meaning to arbitrary numbers. It turns a returned value of "0.1812414156" into "CPU Load = 18%". The SNMP daemon has methods built into it for turning requested OIDs and returning values. This varies for every single ...


2

It doesn't look like it. The default OID to use as the root of the walk is hard coded into the application. I would recommend creating a small wrapper shell script. For example. vendor-snmpwalk.sh: #!/bin/sh /path/to/snmpwalk -Cc -v 2c -c <community> $1 <root vendor OID> Then you just call your wrapper script instead of snmpwalk directly ...


2

This is not guaranteed to work, but does with a few printers - if it does it saves a lot of trial and error. Install the full sw/driver package which installs a utility in the system tray that reports printer status. Install wireshark and start looking at whats going through your nic. We are only interested in looking at SMNP traffic to/from the IP ...


2

Cacti is the most strait forward way to go. Download an install it, it will work with a lot of routers and switches straight out of the box. Also, Observium is even easier to get going but less customisable than Cacti; although it does also work with most switches and routers strait out of the box. Update: Forgot to say these include the MIBs!


2

SNMP uses syntax that's only pre-defined at the top level. Meaning that they left it up to each manufacturer to determine what each of their branches means, and how many leaves it has. It's similar to the DNS structure only there is no registrars, or TLDs. When you want to resolve all those numbers to queryable functions you use the manufacturer provided MIB ...


2

The simple approach would be just monitoring the IF-MIB::ifInOctets.<ifIndex> / IF-MIB::ifOutOctets.<ifIndex> OIDs periodically and checking against the available bandwidth. From your linked MikroTik MIB you can discover the currently set rates by reading the mtxrWlStatTxRate: 1.3.6.1.4.1.14988.1.1.1.1.1.2.<ifIndex> and mtxrWlStatRxRate: ...


2

MIB files are not used directly on your router, rather by the software which reads the output. They basically just map the internal numerical codes into (sort of) human readable descriptions. support came only on later releases. This is needed for collecting data via SNMP. Please verify that whether your router IOS supports ...


2

First, IANA assigns OIDs under 1.3.6.1.4.1 which are "Private Enterprises." Juniper has 1.3.6.1.4.1.2636 (see http://www.alvestrand.no/objectid/1.3.6.1.4.1.html). To get the rest it is better to trace backwards from the last element "jnxOperatingDescr." Here is the definition: jnxOperatingDescr OBJECT-TYPE SYNTAX DisplayString (SIZE (0..255)) ...


2

First hit on google for each: Cisco MIB's: http://www.cisco.com/public/sw-center/netmgmt/cmtk/mibs.shtml Juniper MIB's: http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/software/index_mibs.html ZTE MIB's: http://www.oidview.com/mibs/3902/md-3902-1.html Now go hang your head in shame :)


2

I believe you need to install Dell's OMSA (Openmanage Server Administrator) before you're going to get any data. A quick search found How to configure OMSA/SNMP on Linux.


2

Put to your snmptt.ini file line mibs_environment = ALL And restart snmptt. See if that helps.


1

The snmpttconvertmib script relies on the the Net-SNMP snmptranslate utility to process the MIB files behind-the-scenes. The snmptranslate tool looks for dependent MIB files in the directories specified in the MIBDIRS environment variable. Are you certain that snmptranslate is looking in the right place in your scenario?


1

If your MIB is not available in your equipment, you can't ask him the informations. After that, check if the OID is availble (if you know it) : sometimes the constructor sites are wrong, and you have access to some OIDs but the MIB is not in the available list. Of course, the OIDs is not customizable : it is programmed in hard in the equipment. The MIB ...


1

When in doubt regarding your private OID and you just can't get a definitive answer regarding the usage of this namespace, you can always register a new one. But in practice, it is usually sufficient to just start a new subtree at a relatively high number, say '.1.3.6.1.4.1.9892.10000` and build your structure from there. While you are at it, make sure the ...


1

The default net-snmp copy of SNMPv2-SMI has a definition for zeroDotZero... [mpenning@lnxlmf ietf]$ cd /usr/share/snmp/mibs/ [mpenning@lnxlmf mibs]$ grep zeroDotZero SNMPv2-SMI.txt zeroDotZero OBJECT-IDENTITY [mpenning@lnxlmf mibs]$ It turns out that I had installed an old copy of SNMPv2-SMI.my in my Cisco MIBs directory... this copy of SNMPv2-SMI.my ...


1

After you add it to the MIB path, you need to load it: Secondly, tell the tools to load this MIB: snmpwalk -m +MY-MIB ..... (load it for this command only) or export MIBS=+MY-MIB (load it for this session only) or echo "mibs +MY-MIB" >> $HOME/.snmp/snmp.conf (load it every time)


1

I believe you don't have sufficient license level for the nbar snmp support. Since IOS 15.0 Cisco, in their infinite wisdom) give you access to the feature at a low license level but restrict the SNMP support for that feature to a higher level (I believe its advipservices license for nbar).


1

You may try to snmpwalk this tree iso.3.6.1.2.1.2 snmpwalk -v 2c -c YourCommunity HostnameOrIP iso.3.6.1.2.1.2


1

What you need is usually called a MIB Compiler within the SNMP industry. However, they're not really compilers; they're translators. I don't believe there is a Cacti MIB compiler, but it wouldn't be too hard to create a translator of your own. A useful tool that I highly recommend, is the libsmi suite which contains a program called smidump. smidump outputs ...


1

Turns out it's a bug in the SNMP agent of the software, nomatter which OID you request, it's always returning the same one. Which means if that's the OID you want to collect, great - if you want any of the other data, too bad.


1

MIBs can be provided with different pieces of software and are used by management/monitoring software in order for them to understand what the monitored software is doing. As an example you may install a VMware product, which has MIBs, and then you may use WhatsUpGold to monitor the VMware environment. MIBs describe the alerts/language of the thing you ...


1

See here: http://www.sifizm.com/2009/02/19/using-snmpget-or-snmpwalk-and-a-vendor-mib-file/ On most Linux systems, the MIB files should go to /usr/share/snmp/mibs or probably /usr/local/share/snmp/mibs.


1

The RFC Alarm MIB is used to describe the alarms/notifications that you will be implementing in your own MIB for your own agent. The RFC Alarm MIB is related to your MIB in that the RFC Alarm MIB will create and list of your alarms and describe information about the alarms/notifications that are common with all alarms. Your MIB will be different in that ...



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