Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

The SMTP feature of the Web Server role has been deprecated but has not been removed. You can install it and use it but it's recommended to use another (external) SMTP server. SMTP and the associated management tools are deprecated. Though the functionality is still available in Windows Server 2012, you should begin using System.Net.Smtp. With this API, ...


7

I think the referenced statement from Microsoft is just terrible and completely confusing and I don't think whoever wrote it has any clue about how the SMTP server even works. It doesn't explain why it is deprecated or if anything is wrong with it. Perhaps there are security problems or buffer overruns, but if you're not exposing it on a public port I ...


5

I fought with this for a few weeks. Here are the settings that I'm using on 3 ASP.NET websites that use SMTP gateway to send their emails: Address: smtp.gmail.com Port: 587 1) The port is very important. You may have to enter it like smtp.gmail.com:587 in your SMTP server. I haven't touched Microsoft SMTP in years, so I can't remember what the setup screen ...


4

That's to be expected and is perfectly normal behavior. Any non internal, non ASCII email message (including any attachments) needs to be encoded\decoded. Exchange uses Base64 encoding which adds roughly a 30% overhead to the size of the email. http://support.microsoft.com/kb/323489


4

I can't see your point here. You try to simplify your setup by introducing more complexity and security issues. SMTP is the solution for your problem. Now you only have to look for a good implementation. SMTP comes with built-in queue handling (no file name collisions), failure resistant, redundancy aware due to multiple MX and is an ancient well-tested ...


4

That description in the article you linked to is terrible! But here is what it is trying to tell you: Turning on IIS SMTP in previous versions of Windows did two things: Started an IIS SMTP server. Added programming libraries (i.e. COM objects, etc.) for sending messages. If you used those libraries with no configuration whatsoever, they would submit to ...


3

Your servers must be on the same subnet,as they are using link-local IPv6 addresses to communicate, and probably multicast DNS to do name resolution. IPv6 is always preferred over IPv4 when it is found to be working on Windows 2008 or later servers, and it is enabled by default. You can disable IPv6 to get rid of this, but you would be better off actually ...


3

With IIS6 and the built in SMTP server, I think you're going to be out of luck. The built in SMTP server is pretty limited in its functionality. Outside of writing some kind of plugin (which you can do) or buying a plugin that can implement scanning and logging of the SMTP message envelopes, you're not going to get much more information that what you have ...


3

Found this explanation here of exactly what I needed (when using IIS) : http://fmuntean.wordpress.com/2008/10/26/how-to-configure-iis-smtp-server-to-forward-emails-using-a-gmail-account/ I am sending mail using this C# code var client = new SmtpClient("127.0.0.1", 587); client.EnableSsl = false; Note: the communication between my C# app and my local ...


3

I switched from windows own SMTP/POP3 services to hmailserver a few years ago, never looked back. I assume you're talking about windows 2003 or earlier here, as 2008+ has no inbuilt mail services AFAIK - this is a decision that microsoft made, and it's very unlikely they'll change this policy, as it was introduced to push sysadmins into using exchange.


2

ongle's got it right: you can setup Gmail as a smarthost for your SMTP IIS Virtual Server this way: http://fmuntean.wordpress.com/2008/10/26/how-to-configure-iis-smtp-server-to-forward-emails-using-a-gmail-account/ This also works with an XP machine with IIS 5.1's SMTP Service installed (just tested it with my machine). Note: if you haven't already, I ...


2

In addition to what ongle has suggested, rather than configure a smarthost (which may not be available to you), add a remote domain with an adress space of *.com and set the option that incoming email can be relayed to this remote domain. That way email being sent through the SMTP server to any recipient with a user@domain.com email address can be delivered. ...


2

You can use IIS to setup a SMTP server internally that relays its email to a smart external email server, but that may not be your real problem. It would however give you a central point of administration for sending mail from your server(s). To help let the mail server know you are authorized to send the mail, you can create an SPF record in your DNS ...


2

Since classic ASP is plain text you could do a text search across the server for common ASP commands for sending mail such as CreateObject("CDO.Message") From there you should be able to see how the script is setting up the 'from' address. I'd say that any scripts that have a dynamic FROM value or alternatively if you have known junk consistently from ...


2

Better bet would be to use SMTP via tcp/ip i.e. listening on port 25 (or any other port) and then using System.Net.Mail's MailMessage and SmtpClient. You then could throw a load balancer in front of the SMTP server and have each server connect to that load balanced name/ip.


2

It looks like the behaviour you describe is default for the SMTP service in IIS and can't be changed: http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/WindowsServer2003/Library/IIS/6bb0d71f-d3d7-4f59-aa01-4d5c022274a4.mspx?mfr=true


2

I tried to use del /q *.* and rd but no results. Several days the commands have been only preparing for deleting... What was the progress no one did know... I decided to write a script so the bad files would be deleted one by one. At least with it you can see that the files are deleted. At start they are deleted slowly, but then the process increases speed ...


2

The server's probably set up to not allow authentication over a plaintext connection. What happens if you send AUTH PLAIN after the EHLO? Does it complain about AUTH PLAIN over a clear channel?


2

Both the two examples you give are invalid. MAIL FROM: "Francois Barriere"<francois.barriere@example.com> is invalid and I would expect most servers to reject it. MAIL FROM: <francois.barriere@example.com> is also invalid, but most servers accept it. I have however been rejecting it for years, since rejecting this invalid format got rid of ...


1

I have now found the issue - everything was working as expected; however Outlook had cached the email address I was sending a test to, and causing the issue. Deleting my .NK2 file fixed this.


1

In IPv6, addresses in the subnet fe80::/10 are link-local addresses, (RFC 4291) and are automatically assigned on any interface on which IPv6 is enabled (which is by default in any modern operating system). These are roughly comparable to IPv4 169.254.0.0/16 link-local addresses, (RFC 3927) except that in IPv6, every interface always has a link-local ...


1

This is strictly theoretical but I read an article on a similar situation a while ago. You should be able to use a Wireshark type product configured on the loopback address to get a packet capture containing all the references to your default SMTP connector. Might be worth looking into. http://wiki.wireshark.org/CaptureSetup/Loopback


1

you need to setup the smtp server on your server, please refer http://www.itsolutionskb.com/2008/11/installing-and-configuring-windows-server-2008-smtp-server/


1

If the server responds to the ehlo command and lists Chunking, then it supports BDAT. To test your server, telnet to it on port 25 and issue the ehlo command. It will then list which of the ESMTP commands that it supports. If Chunking is in the list then BDAT is not the problem. Because this is Exchange you should see that it supports the full ESMTP command ...


1

The Exchange Best Practices Analyzer will check to see if the server supports BDAT (their writeup on this particular test can be found here: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa997593.aspx). Not sure if disabling the CHUNKING and BINARYMIME verbs will help, but if you want to try it for purposes of receiving that particular e-mail from the Italian ...


1

The Exchange server appears to be trying to connect back to you (something like ident?), so you should try a packet sniffer (like Wireshark) to see where it is trying to connect. Another way to interpret that message. SMTP, like most internet protocols, uses CR/LF pair as line terminator. And so does the telnet protocol. However, it might happen that in ...


1

You might consider making contact with the admins/postmasters of that domain. They may be able to provide more specific details as to what is triggering the rejection by their system(s).


1

Dont do email marketing. Don't. Streamsend, Mailchimp or Constant Contact are spammers by any other name. A pig with lipstick is still a pig. If you must, just customize an existing solution. Very customizable: sendmail


1

[SOLVED] Hi guys, In the event that, like me, somebody else comes across this page trying to find an answer.. I had the exact same problem using Virtual SMTP server on an XP x64 box with 4GB ram and plenty of disk space so I knew it was not a resource issue. I tried adding various directory security settings (including everybody with full control to the ...


1

My advice. Don't. Sending newsletters from your primary mailserver can be a VERY bad idea. Here's a few reasons why. You tie up your mailserver when it could be sending other mail You tie up your network connection to the server, you're already using 90% of your committed data rate. If someone reports it as spam, or mail providers get wind that your ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible