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6

The role of the Agent Monitoring is umbrella term for many functions. The function of an "agent" is essentially to make data available to the rest of the system. To put it in context, you might try to fit it into the model proposed by Dickson from his "Working theory of Monitoring" talk. So agents generally fit into "Sensing/Measurement" and maybe the ...


5

You can easily track per-process network statistics using nethogs. There is a precompiled package for Debian. It works similarly to top: NetHogs version 0.8.0 PID USER PROGRAM DEV SENT RECEIVED 11951 dawud /usr/lib64/firefox/firefox p5p1 4.682 5.502 KB/sec 1145 tomcat java ...


3

postfix logs each connection as it comes in, and the log lines look like Jul 8 16:25:15 swiss postfix/smtpd[11127]: connect from some.host.or.other [192.0.2.1] so you can tail -F your logfile (on my system it's /var/log/mail.log), use grep to filter the lines you want, and watch the live traffic.


3

As of Munin 2.0 you can use a feature called supersampling to collect data points with 1-second resolution. The Munin polling interval still will be 5 minutes, the respective Munin plugin is responsible for actively collecting and storing the high-resolution data. There is a sample implementation - the multicpu1sec plugin which is recording mpstat data. Now ...


2

Munin is a good tool, and I quite like it. However I have sometimes found that for specific use cases, doing my own sampling, and using rrdtool works better. In this case - you can probably get the raw data you want by ifconfig, and look at rx and tx bytes. This you can feed into a custom RRD build around DERIVE. rrdtool create netmax.rrd -s 1 ...


2

I posted a similar answer to a question on StackOverflow(http://stackoverflow.com/questions/21025495/system-for-monitoring-cron-jobs-and-automated-tasks) Cronitor (https://cronitor.io) was a tool I built exactly for this purpose. It basically boils down to being a tracking beacon that uses http requests as the pings. However, one of the needs that the OP ...


2

On ZFS On Linux, starting with version 0.6.3 this can be handled quite elegantly by using the ZFS Event Daemon (zed). The event daemon, by virtue of monitoring the kernel events directly, can react almost immediately to any events that take place and does not depend on continuous polling and parsing of some other command's output. Create a shell script with ...


2

I would modify your sensu (nagios?) plugin to run a ps or top command and dump the output to a local file. Then go back and correlate your spikes to the ps/top output to figure out what is going on. If you don't want to or can't do the change, look at sar or atop. EDIT: Next idea, run tcpdump then review the traffic in wireshark.


1

Borrowed from sensu FAQ: http://sensuapp.org/docs/0.12/faq#how-do-i-increase-log-verbosity You can adjust the process log level by setting LOG_LEVEL in /etc/default/sensu to either debug, info, warn or error. You will need to restart the Sensu process(s) after making the adjustment. This will work for both server and client. Don't forget to restart ...


1

If you use heartbeat 3.0.x from EPEL, then you should use crm_mon command. This will show you all the information you want: # crm_mon -1 Its output includes the number of nodes, uname, uuid, status, the resources configured in your cluster, and the current status of each. If you want to group resources by node, run a command like this: # crm_mon ...


1

There is no way to know the underlying device status/hierarchy without using a tools that can talk to a RAID driver. For example if you use MegaSAS RAID controllers, Linux only recognizes "sda", and to see details you have to use special tool called megacli. So, you have to either turn off your motherboard RAID and use linux mdraid, in which case you will ...


1

That's because the 'sockets' stats are counters, not units. They're counting the sockets, not network traffic. Units would likely be metric, so if you get over 1024 you might see a 1K in there.


1

The above poster is close. tail allows you to see the last 10 lines in a file. The -f switch allows you to see new lines as they are appended to the maillog file. cd /var/log tail -f maillog Ctrl+c to escape. Seeing this is already written to a file called /var/log/maillog, not sure why you would want to create another file unless you are looking to ...


1

We use devices like this in our datacenter. They're called KVM switches (abbreviation for "keyboard, video and mouse"). The "over the network" part is solved by IPKVM. I can recommend ATEN Hope that helps.



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