Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I had the same behaviour when I needed to change the server the client was reporting to. On Debian, I found that the file /etc/default/hobbit-client was actually providing the IP address. I tracked this down when I saw it was an included file in /etc/hobbit/hobbitclient.cfg.


-2

Back in the mists of time, I heard about this tool: bing. It has some limits but it may be of help even though, of course, it needs to send some traffic through the links we are trying to determine the effective bandwidth of. Hope this helps!


2

Is this possible at all? No, this is not possible. By definition, measuring bandwidth requires actually sending/receiving traffic, and since networking gear has a finite amount of information it can pass in a certain time period, you will be consuming a certain amount of that finite resource. Sure, you could turn on QoS in your switch/routing gear and ...


0

Without installing new tools: while ifconfig eth0 | grep 'RX bytes'; do sleep 10; done


1

We had a similar problem where one service checked via NRPE in a container returned an expected WARNING, then after some minutes the same service returned CRITICAL with the 141/SIGPIPE error. On the next check it returned WARNING then CRITICAL, then WARNING and so on. I performed a traffic capture for the error and found Nagios issue #305 to quite precisely ...


4

WMI You can access WMI parameters directly with WMI client installed on Linux machine: Compile and install wmi-client package manually or use compiled packages from www.orvant.com it seem to work with newer versions of Ubuntu as well (14.04 64bit). Here is an example of wmic usage from command line: wmic -Uuser%pass //192.168.0.2 "SELECT FileSize FROM ...


0

I think auditd might be what you're looking for. Though I'm not sure if is capable of logging diffs.


3

Yeah, sadly, I think you're going to end up installing nsclient++. My first thought was to just write a vbscript or powershell script to check the size of the page file, but my first attempts returned null results because Windows is managing my pagefile. Apparently, this is a common thing. However, this plugin appears to work. It's also a lot more ...


0

Is this okay for you? Command: define command{ command_name check_win_memusage command_line $USER1$/check_nrpe -H $HOSTADDRESS$ -p 5666 -c checkMem -a MaxWarn=$ARG1$ MaxCrit=$ARG2$ ShowAll type=$ARG3$ } Service: check_win_memusage!90%!95%!paged


1

In Ubuntu 12.04 there is an error in /etc/default/iwatch, the variable iwatch is actually looking for is CONFIGFILE and not CONFIG_FILE so point it to your custome config with CONFIGFILE=/etc/iwatch/iwatch.xml


0

Working with Nagios Server and NRPE Client to automatically restart services on failure January 13, 2015 Executing Remote Commands using Nagios and NRPE 1. Installing NRPE on remote host: rpm -Uvh http://download.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/6/i386/epel-release-6-8.noarch.rpm yum –enablerepo=epel -y install nrpe nagios-plugins yum –enablerepo=epel -y list ...


1

You don't state which plugin you're using, but there's no reason you can't use SNMP to check the "Virtual Memory" usage. For example, when you walk this tree (1.3.6.1.2.1.25.2) against a Windows 2008 server with SNMP, you'll see output that includes something like this: HOST-RESOURCES-MIB::hrStorageDescr.4 = STRING: Virtual Memory ...


0

I just checked on two Dell (R610) and I can see more information. Your server PS model seem to allow less monitoring option. Please check in the Dell OpenManage too. You can see power management informaton from there. On my side I can see the current amp per PS, the watt, btu/hr, total energy consumed and some reading for the systemboard power current ...


1

You can set up CloudWatch log monitoring on your Apache instance monitoring the Apache access log. Then create a metric filter in cloudwatch with something like: [host, logName, user, timestamp, request, statusCode=301, size, referer, useragent, ...] You'll then get a pretty graph in CloudWatch of 301 redirects over time, and you can create CloudWatch ...


0

Whatever monitoring software you're using already might support that. Nagios, for example, returns this from check_http: HTTP OK: HTTP/1.1 302 Redirect - 377 bytes in 0.073 second response time You could probably get it to check specifically for the 302 redirect. (The -f follow switch follows the redirect, but that may or may not be what you're looking ...


-3

You need to install the SNMP Tools feature to get those tab pages, e.g. using the Powershell command Install-WindowsFeature RSAT-SNMP. Remember to restart the service manager before opening the properties page again.


0

I suggest snmpd for linux clients and zenoss as a monitoring server, I used to work with it and they are awesome. you can try my script to basicly config your clients too #clone https://github.com/mrafieee/shell-scripts/blob/master/snmp-basic-config.sh #chmod +x snmp-basic-config.sh #sudo sh snmp-basic-config.sh 192.168.1.2 community-name ...


0

check out https://cronitor.io -- you can monitor a single cron job for free. When your jobs run, they ping Cronitor and if Cronitor doesn't get pinged at the right times it will send you an alert.


13

man ps, section etime: etime ELAPSED elapsed time since the process was started, in the form [[dd-]hh:]mm:ss. So your process runs for longer than a day.



Top 50 recent answers are included