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24

I would use an industrial IDE SSD...(another option). It doesn't sound like you need much space, and there are SSDs made specifically for this purpose. I would NOT bother with IDE adapters and consumer-level SSDs for this application. If you do go for compact flash, again, try something that's purpose-built for the application.


18

Does it have to be a SATA SSD? CompactFlash cards are pin-for-pin compatible with the ATA standard 1. Which means you can use a passive electrical adapter to connect one to an IDE cable (or two!). Would this give you enough space (I've seen some mahoosive CF cards...), I wonder. It'd give you the reliability of solid state memory, and the oldness of ...


10

Direct Answer: Ask the manufacturer what they recommend. I only know of a few manufactures who make honest server grade equipment, and they all make chassis for their boards as well - where they can ensure a proper fit, access to all components, warranty, and compatible accessories. Indirect "More Correct" Answer: Professionals don't built white-box ...


8

Yes :) you don't have to plug the two processors. I have the Tyan i5400xt (Xeon Harpertown) and I simply plugged the first processor for months. You don't have anything to do, the bios will see that there is only one cpu.


8

1) Kingston ValueRam is generally Non-ECC, so stable it won't be. Certainly if you get memory errors, then you might get some pretty serious OS faults. 2) You want a server. A real live server.. That will cost you a lot more than $300. I reckon you should be looking to pay somewhere between $1500 and $3500. Look at the Dell Configurator, and spec up a ...


7

Technically it might be possible but is the chassis worth that much? Unless you can receive assurance that the new MB fits 100%, it may be too much grief. As noted you need new MB, RAM and CPU and possibly power supplies And keeping old power supplies would be asking for a failure.


7

You are a bit confused, I will try and keep this simple: DOS is an operating system mainstreamed by Microsoft. BIOS is an operating system (arguably) of very limited nature, that is typically stored as firmware on a motherboard. It is far less functional and complex, it just to "get things going" with relation to the hardware inside a computer, before ...


5

If you mean the RAID controller built into the motherboard, I'd AVOID IT. It's not true hardware RAID. Motherboard RAID is regarded as the worst of RAIDs, as it is motherboard specific, there are several online instances of the motherboard just losing the RAID configuration and hosing volumes, and in the end, if you're trying to get RAID on the less ...


5

Sure it can. My suggestion is: Don't do it. Fill it up to the limit right away. My argument is that in general these kinds of system REQUIRE all CPUs to be 100% identical. If you wait a month too long you may very well run into the required additional CPUs no longer being available.... of being very expensive.


5

A Dual socket board will be configured with two CPU systems that includes memory slots associated to each socket. If there are two memory banks each will be wired to a CPU slot. The memory bank will not be directly available for the other slot. That implies a motherboard with 72GB capacity has 36GB per CPU SLOT capacity. However, if your DIMMs are ...


5

You've kind of answered this yourself, by the use of buffering - by using buffers memory operations don't have to be precisely synchronised allowing for more memory per channel. It's why registered memory is more expensive, it allows more memory per channel.


5

To be honest, its very difficult to find the parts that are compatible with ESXi. Especially building from scratch. You are way better off going to a site such as ebay for a used desktop of sorts. Personally, I picked up a Dell T5500 for $525 (Dual Quad-Core processors, 16GB of RAM, RAID card). Otherwise your first step will be to check what is compatible ...


5

The Mobo manufacturer should list the compatible CPUs. Check their HCL. Also, building your own pizza-box is almost universally more expensive than buying something from HP, Dell, IBM, SuperMicro, etc. The CapEx is usually a much smaller component of the TCO than OpEx, and your pizza-box is going to have twice the OpEx over its life.


5

Do all LGA 1155 Motherboards work with all LGA 1155 CPUs How could we ever know for certain, imagine how long it would take to test every combination, and who's going to do that anyway? If you mean "generally do all LGA 1155 Motherboards work with any LGA 1155 CPU" then the answer is yes, that's the point of having compatible pin-outs. But you do have ...


5

It's a 9 year-old server... The DL380 G4 has been eclipsed by the G5, G6, G7 and now Gen8 systems. The model went end-of-life in 2006 or so. That's four jumps in processing and hardware technology. Really, that's all there is to say. It's not a good platform to continue to troubleshoot or invest anything in. Why? You are out of support! The current BIOS ...


5

For that much storage, you're going to need a storage solution, not a single server. Something like an Isilon installation, or a clustered/scale-out file solution on either Windows or Linux. Given that you're not even sure how to do RAID for this, I'd recommend that you hire a pro, if this storage is going to be used for something professional. It will be ...


4

From the logical operating system view, full ram is accessible to each core. From a performance standpoint, there are differences depending on the memory location and the physical layout of the chips. Memory accesses will be routed through the necessary pathing, probably costing performance, depending on the location. Looking at Nehalem type Boards, packs ...


4

Use the service tag to display the original system configuration. It should have a Dell part number for the mother board and may even have a model number.


4

I read a post maybe last week that said you can't put a HBA card on the only x16 slot on motherboard that doesn't have onboard video. Is there any truth to this? That would be BIOS dependent, and I don't know about Gigabyte boards. So long as there is some video capability somewhere it should not cause issues putting a non-Video card in that x16 slot.


4

Ultimate boot cd would be the first thing I would use.


4

Both CPU's should be identical.


4

After considering the situation, I realized that all of the drives that were having issues were part of raid configurations that I had dismantled. The specific issue was that Windows installation could not find some of the drives from these raid configurations. The raid levels I had used for multiple arrays were 5 and 0 respectively. I theorized that even ...


4

Switched PDU. Here's an APC one, but other brands do exist. Basically it's like a power strip, except with C13/C14 sockets, and a bunch of relays, so they're web/snmp controllable.


3

Only desktop Intel/AMD stuff. On other CPU systems like Itanium you need dummy voltage regulartor modules that are put into the CPU socket. I once (around 2003) bought a MP Board for AMD and plugged in only one CPU. Thought spend 200 Euro more and therefore have a later option (when CPU's are cheaper and my business is going) i can get double speed upgrade. ...


3

Generally the answer to this is No. Your memory controller is what limits the amount of Memory your board can accept and I am not aware of any BIOS update that can help with this.


3

FOr a definitive answer you should be consulting the motherboard documentation, or the manufacturer if the documentation doesn't make it clear. Knowing how it works for other motherboards is of no value whatsoever.


3

You can use FreeDos. HP USB Disk Storage Format Tool FreeDos I was able to use recently this tutorial: CREATING A BOOTABLE DOS USB STICK FOR BIOS 1. extract the directory “odin” from the FreeDOS .iso image 2. install HP USB Disk Storage Format Tool and run it. 3. Select your usb stick, “fat” as filesystem, check “Create a DOS startup disk” and ...


3

Personally, I wouldn't bother for a 1U box. I've built a few rack-mount boxes over the years, but almost all 2U, simply because it's easier to fit things in and easier to buy stuff that will fit.


3

Fairly stable is not the same as completely stable. Lots of things can mess up in RAM - heat, failing chips, cosmic radiation, gremlins, unstable power. It may only mess up one in a few trillion trillion times - but RAM is reading and writing millions of bits a second. ECC RAM is designed to be able to catch those failures and fix them. For a server, ...


3

See here, http://www.jaton.com/vga/graphics_card_detail.php?pid=199 I verified your card is a PCI card. Your motherboard supports, One low profile riser slot supporting 1U or 2U PCIe* riser cards One full height riser slot supporting 1U or 2U PCI-X* and PCIe* riser cards I'm not sure if your card is a 3.3v PCI card to be supported in the adaptive PCI-X ...



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