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0

Option #1: auFS by itself dosen't support such a mount option, so option #1 is dead. You have to work around that. Option #3: Of course, you can simply delete at each bootup those directories. It may be the simplest way I see here. Option #2: You could work with a tmpfs. So first create a tmpfs, let's say of size 500 MB: mount -t tmpfs -o rw,size=500M ...


0

If you are not using RPM packages it is possible you are experiencing this bug: https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1191176 The names of volfiles on disk was changed for improved rdma support. This change was introduced in 3.6.2. stop glusterd, run glusterd --xlator-option *.upgrade=on -N to regenerate the volfiles, start glusterd (on all ...


0

NO it is NOT! /mnt/resource or /mnt (in Ubuntu VMs) is a temporary storage, Microsoft does not guarantee any data being saved in that location between reboots or downtime.


5

What you want do do can be achieved precisely with overlayfs. With it you can take your /full dir and another /notfull dir and mount them at /third-dir. Reads will seek through the /notfull into the /full and writes will go to a third dir. Have a look at the docs, remount the full dir away from the target name and then use overlayfs to recreate the ...


2

You won't be able to expand the space by mounting them both on /folder if that's what you want. If you want to create another directory like /folder/newshare like you said, you should be able to mount another NFS share there to make it seem like there's more space under /folder. I just confirmed that I could create a mount point for a NFS share inside ...


-1

Steps: Go to disk management and Action menue -> Create VHD. Set the VHD path to network path with Disk size > 2TB and it will show the disk on Disk management. Bring the disk online and format and Done. Cheers!


-2

Speaking from my own experiences. Check your fstab as well, to ensure you're trying to mount the device as its logical volume and not the alias you gave or are using off /etc/multipath/bindings.


0

Setup: VirtualBox 4.3.26, Win 7 SP1 host, Debian jessie 8.0 (stable) guest. In VirtualBox Manager, select Shared Folders Settings... in the Devices drop-down menu. In the resulting pop-up window, select Machine Folders in the Folders List and then click the "Add a New Shared Folder Definition" button (the blue folder with a green "+" sign icon to the right ...


1

I am not sure if this fits your purpose, but have you considered tar to combine multiple files? That might decrease the pressure and space requirements on the filesystem, and your database application can read data for a specific file with one of the many tar libraries around. Depending on your access pattern this might even increase the performance.


7

You probably just want to use XFS. It's quite capable of what you're asking for, and does the job. There's no reason to complicate this with lesser-used filesystems, which can come with other tradeoffs. Please see: How does the number of subdirectories impact drive read / write performance on Linux? and The impact of a high directory-to-file ratio on XFS ...


2

Seeing the number of small files, I would consider using SquashFS. Especially if you have powerful enough CPU (meaning no Pentium III, or 1GHz ARM). Depending on the type of data stored, SquashFS can greatly reduce its size and thus the I/O when reading it. Only downside is CPU usage on read. On the other hand, any modern CPU can decompress at speeds far ...


2

If it is read-only, why to not use a ISO file? You can use genisoimage or mkisofs. If you want to compress the whole thing, you can also use squashfs, another read-only filesystem with very high compression ratio.


-5

Media (USB Key, CD, harddrives) must be formatted as FAT (16 or 32) to be readable from EFI.


0

For the persons for which a manual intervention is not a problem, here is the simple procedure. Open another terminal tty2 or tty3 by pressing alt+F2 or alt+F3 and press enter Un-mount the USB drive from /media: umount /media/ Identify the USB drive sdX in the device list (sda, sdb, sdc, …) ls -l /sys/block/sd* | grep usb Mount the USB drive to /cdrom ...


1

I received the same error without further ado from a new Samba client, when trying to mount a CIFS SMB network share: mount error(112): Host is down Eventually, it turned out I had previously restricted SMB server access to only a limited number of IP addresses by configuring /etc/samba/smb.conf: # Allow these IP Addresses to connect: hosts allow = ...


0

The following is where the problem is. drw-rw-r-x http http /home/httpd The permissions should in stead be (and the same for the subdirectory) drwxrwxr-x http http /home/httpd since you can’t access the contents of a folder without being able to execute (open) it.


0

You can use part of the answer here which deals with adding udev rules: http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/74123/what-is-the-service-thats-responsible-for-automounting-a-usb-drive-in-centos-6 Add a file to /etc/udev/rules.d Add lines as per the answer, but add the label argument to the pmount command, eg: automount.rules # automounting usb flash ...


1

1.Make USB device base name permanent(eg: Iomega usb device) To avoid any confusion whether base name for your USB block device is /dev/sdb1, /dev/sdd1 or /dev/sdXn we make it permanently /dev/Iomega anytime you plug it in. This can be done with help of udev device manager. You should have udev already installed on your system, otherwise install it with: ...



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