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7

Write a script that regenerates your MRTG configuration whenever the interface is restarted. Also, adjust your MRTG configuration to target an interface based on the IP address. Specifcally if you use cfgmaker to build your config, then pass the --ifref=ip option, assuming your IP is consistent. If your IP isn't consistent, then check the man page other ...


5

According to the docs, MRTG uses 1000 as the kilo multiplier by default. You can change it as follows: kilo[mem]: 1024


4

A vague, short answer to a vague, short question: snmpd is probably not automatically starting during the server startup. Start snmpd at the server you are trying to graph.


4

Kind of, i.e. with MRTG by the same author, which uses rrdtool for generating graphics. Other tools as Cacti etc. might work as well. RRDtool is only a completely generic graphing tool and it will plot whatever data you feed it. Edit: I overlooked the "real time" part when answering. In this case, I assume rrdtool is not the right tool for you, as it is ...


3

If you don't HAVE to use RRDTool, you could look at Graphite, which uses a processing backend called "carbon" that stores data in a database called "whisper". It's very "realtime". http://graphite.wikidot.com/faq#toc0


3

You can poll ifInOctets/ifOutOctet/ifHCInOctets/ifHCOutOctets every minute without any update problem. The only problem you can have is big CPU usage on the switch/router if you poll to much OIDs/minute (this highly depend on the device model) PS: MRTG with default storage engine only store data each 5 minutes, so be sure to store data into rrd files


2

The way the SNMP counters work with MRTG (rrd) is that they are the total traffic sent. They than wrap around at 2^32 and 2^64. Then MRTG takes the measurements and figures out the rate from the difference of the two measurements. So it is not like it is taking a snapshot of the current rate. So my point is that if you poll for the amount of traffic sent ...


2

The way to fix this is to run a periodic poll of the switch and auto-generate your MRTG configs. There is a key utility that comes with MRTG that's called cfgmaker. This is a utility that will auto-generate pages based on data it pulls out of a target's SNMP data. The key is to name your pages after the interfaces and populate any descriptive names in the ...


2

You can use the rrdgraph command line tool to generate graphs using the rrd files that MRTG generates. You can inspect he rrd file and see how soon it is consolidating the data, if it does this only after a day then you will loose the resolution that you are after. So basically I would for where MRTG stores the rra templates and the rrd graph templates. It ...


2

This is counter rollover. Make sure you are using SNMPv2(SNMP v2 use 64-bit counters). Add :::::2 to switch definition(Target[myswitch]: 2:public@switch1:::::2) and enable SNMP v2 on switch.


2

From the documentation, under RunAsDaemon: If you want mrtg to run under a particular user and group (it is not recomended to run MRTG as root) then you can use the --user=user_name and --group=group_name options on the mrtg commandline. mrtg --user=mrtg_user --group=mrtg_group mrtg.cfg http://oss.oetiker.ch/mrtg/doc/mrtg-reference.en.html


1

When you create your MRTG cfg file, do not identify the interface by number. Instead, identify it by ifName or similar. For example this identifies the device by ifName, Target[tun_w]: #tun_w:public@router If the ifName is not unique, then try by ifDescr (use a backstroke to escape any spaces or colons in the description): Target[tun_w]: ...


1

It should be as simple as taking the unwanted interfaces out of your mrtg.cfg file. Each interface should have its own set of lines with a unique identifier, so remove the lines you don't want. If you're using some kind of script to generate the mrtg.cfg file, then you'll have to look to that. If you're using the stock cfgmaker script, you can apply an ...


1

have you try Cacti there is plugin for netflow (honestly i never use this plugin), maybe you want to take a look (http://gregsowell.com/?p=610)


1

Have you previously been collecting data? If not, there's no way to retroactively get old performance data.


1

The usage statement clearly says that cfgmaker requires a router argument, but you haven't provided one. Add in your router argument and optional SNMP community: cfgmaker --global 'WorkDir: /var/www/mrtg' --output=/etc/mrtg/mrtg.cfg public@192.0.2.1


1

The Cisco SNMP Object Navigator is going to be your friend in these kinds of questions. You can look up your image name to find all supported MIBs, and more or less copy and modify an existing cfgmaker-generated stanza to graph the particular value you're interested in. The good news is that your question is already answered over on the MRTG mailing list: ...


1

I understand that this is somewhat of a "halfway" answer because it suggests a completely different solution than what you're using, but you did say in the question that you have a 'basic' MRTG config... this implies it wouldn't be that hard to move to something else. My suggestion uses the 'successor' to MRTG (rrdtool) for its graphing, and was made by the ...


1

This is absolutely possible. The text on and around the graphs is fully themeable. The documentation shows this pretty well. For example, to change the "Traffic Analysis for xyz" text use the key: Title[GigE2/1]: Description of switch port GigE2/1 If you're generating your MRTG graphs by way of cfgmaker cfgmaker --ifdesc=descr $OtherOptions Should ...


1

MRTG is great for pulling counters from network interfaces (and temperatures, and CPU usage, and other things, too). If a device doesn't provide an SNMP-accessible counter for what you want to measure, though, MRTG won't be a lot of help. In the case of a Cisco PIX, no SNMP counters are provided in its MIB for "sessions". The PIX is capable of reporting the ...


1

If you want to look at IP bandwidth usage, you might use ntop for smaller installations. I have had problems with ntop scaling, and so I am using a nfsen/nfdump combination to figure out who is doing what. This might be the way to go if your Cisco device can generate netflows. If you are going to go the snmp route, I encourage you to look into cacti, as ...


1

If you're running Windows on your NMS or workstation, you can install PRTG and create a packet sniffer sensor. Then create a port monitor on the switch port that the PIX is connected to and mirror the traffic to the port that your NMS or workstation is connected to. The packet sniffer sensor will see all traffic flowing into or out of the PIX and categorize ...


1

You need to activate mod_status within your Apache instance. For a good explanation visit http://www.linux-sottises.net/en_mrtg.php and use the scripts provided there.


1

The problem you have here is that you're overwriting mrtg.cfg every single time you're running cfgmaker, if you check your mrtg.cfg you'll see that the data there is only the data related to your latest switch. In order to overcome this problem you can do several things * Merge the mrtg files manually * Have one mrtg.cfg file per device and one directory ...


1

I solved problem configuring command like this: define command{ command_name check_local_mrtgtraf command_line $USER1$/check_mrtgtraf $ARG1$ 10 AVG $ARG2$ $ARG3$ $ARG4$ } and defining service like this: define service { use ... host_name .... ... check_command ...


1

You can use MRTS for this task, it gathers information from RRD Files (these are generated by MRTG) and displays statistics of traffic in/out/total over desired timeperiods. MRTS is just a php script, so no need to install it per se. It's also open-source, so you can add functionality or alter its behaviour.



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