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34

There should be no problems in doing it yourself, however, you need an experienced sysadmin, or a sysadmin willing to learn something new. It's not as easy as just running another daemon and opening a port in the firewall. I run an MTA for personal projects on a VPS, and while you of course need high availability and be able to handle way more load, the ...


18

Unfortunately the IP is blacklisted irrespective of the hardware that sits behind it, so there's not a lot you can do about your existing reputation except ensuring you are sending mail correctly and contacting the relevant spam lists. You may have to wait a few days or weeks for the situation to improve. I would recommend using Google Apps for SMTP to ...


15

Our own SysAdmin told us it is not difficult at all to have our own MTA, but I'm afraid he might have oversimplified this. Either he is some kind of uber-geek, or he doesn't understand the problem. Running an MTA is relatively simple. Running a MTA delivering a high-volume of bulk-emails while maintaining good deliverability is very, very complicated. ...


15

Unless your company is in the business of sending emails, then I would only look at this as a last resort. There's a lot of companies out there that send bulk emails, so I'd be inclined to shop around (or re-negotiate fees) before investing time & resources into building up and supporting your own MTA solution. Keeping a company agile and able to ...


14

One consequence of removing the MTA is that mail generated by the system itself (usually sent to root), for example by Cron, Logwatch, rkhunter and others cannot be be delivered. So yes, an MTA is an integral part of any Unix-like system and I doubt Debian will let you uninstall the MTA without complaining and suggesting an alternative. But it's not a big ...


12

You need to get the message id first with postqueue -p then once you have the message id you read it with postcat -q messageid. Of course replace messageid with the actual id you find.


11

If you have the required experience, you can do it. I suggest to not lose the emails, to start testing your new MTA with a small amount of emails. When you are satisfied, you can use it for all you emails.


11

Sendmail is a different (and much older) program from Postfix. However for every mail server to succeed in the Unix environment, a sendmail binary (with some of the expected command line options) must be provided. EDIT: See for example the manual page for the sendmail program provided by Postfix


10

Easiest way might be to get the PID of what's listening on port 25: # lsof -i :25 COMMAND PID USER FD TYPE DEVICE SIZE NODE NAME master 5664 root 12u IPv4 13732 TCP *:smtp (LISTEN) Then find out what that process is: # ps p 5664 PID TTY STAT TIME COMMAND 5664 ? Ss 0:12 /usr/lib/postfix/master And I'm running ...


10

Simply changed: 127.0.0.1 localhost localhost.localdomain 127.0.0.1 foo.bar To this 127.0.0.1 localhost localhost.localdomain foo.bar Sendmail looks for a fully qualified domain (FQDN) name and will use the localhost.localdomain in the single line version.


9

Install Postfix, configure it for the local network and make it listen only to the loopback-interface. If you have an external mailbox ready and only want to send emails to it, you could probably just install ssmtp and be happy.


9

If you are doing that volume of email, I expect you have an automated system sending the email. Based on the amount of email you are generating, it appears that to some extent your are in the business of sending email. How important to your business is it that your email get delivered. If it is important, you need to get a good handle on how your email ...


7

The MTA is used to handle all kinds of messaging, not just email to user mailboxes. On my CentOS system, it is using a whopping 4 MB of RAM. That's less than one PHP thread. Don't jeopardize the stability and operation of your server for a pittance of extra capacity. Buy more capacity instead.


6

The problem you're having is that "mail server" is an imprecise term. Some people take it to mean "MTA" (because that's all you need to have a server that handles mail), whilst others take it to mean a server that receives mail and stores it for users to manipulate, while still other people have other definitions entirely. The four software packages you ...


6

I ran an MTA with a self-signed certificate for a couple of years, until real ones got cheap enough that I could no longer be bothered to do so, and I didn't have a single rejection because of the unsigned certificate in all that time. I never had a single complaint about a mail being marked as spam because of it, either; if anything, using TLS often seems ...


6

The simplest way is to make sure you have only localhost defined in mynetworks: mynetworks = 127.0.0.0/8, [::1]/128 By default smtpd_recipient_restrictions is set as: smtpd_recipient_restrictions = permit_mynetworks, reject_unauth_destination This will allow hosts defined in mynetworks (localhost, as above) to send anywhere, while everything else is ...


6

Your provider's an idiot. They should give you one server name to plug into your MTA and do their own load balancing. I'd be inclined just to throw one name into my relayhost directive and be done with it. You could define a local name with the A records of all your provider's machines (taken from resolving the names they've given you), but it makes no ...


5

There are many ways to do this with many pieces of software. I think most MTAs are capable of some kind of archiving based on configuration. With Postfix, you can almost one-liner it: add an always_bcc: your.address@archive.yourco.com to the configuration file. If all mail goes through it, you'll be set. Dealing with the files after they've been delivered ...


5

http://status.slicehost.com/2009/11/11/email-issues-spamhaus-pbl I have A VPS with those guys. Apparently Rackspace preemptivly listed a bunch of their IP's, but you can request a remove of the block though spamhaus's list (at least) on a ip-by-ip basis. I had to do this with my host once I noticed gmail was refusing delivery. 24hrs after I requested to ...


5

you cannot really get off the greylist. it's mechanism deferring mail delivery. as long as you use reasonable smtp server it will re-try in 10-30 minutes and then grey-list protected server should accept your message. more info about mechanism here and here.


5

sudo update-rc.d sendmail disable But I don't see how this is going to help your non-working mail() function.


4

2 Questions here.. Is is it possible, yes in a backup MX kind of way. I use Postfix as the backup MX SMTP server, so when the main SMTP point is down on the exchange server (due to reboot, patching or whatever) the linux box will store any overflow mail that the exchange server couldn't cope with. How I do it is with MX records in the domain files, ...


4

most mail servers will identify themselves justin@bert ~ % telnet localhost 25 Trying 127.0.0.1... Connected to localhost. Escape character is '^]'. 220 xxxx ESMTP Exim 4.69 Sat, 09 Jan 2010 15:08:05 -0500


4

In the explanation that follows, I am assuming that you followed the instructions in the URL you mentioned and you have selected "internet server". I also assume that "localhost" is one of the valid domain names that your exim is configured to recognize as a local domain. First, the format of what you put in /etc/aliases should have been: admin: ...


4

Greylisting should return 4XX codes, i.e. "Temporarily rejected". Your SMTP server should not bounce back. If that's the case check your mail server configuration.


4

A 'real' MTA (like postfix) can be simple to configure if you just need aliases : create your /etc/aliases file and do a newaliases. At least, you must think about spams if you forward them to a big ISP because your IP can be detect as spammer.


4

I created a new transport with a pipe command that writes e-mail down to a file. Basically: Create a user that will own e-mail (or use an existing one). I called mine email mkdir /home/email/bin Place the following script in /home/email/bin/mail_eater (this uses PHP, but you can write your own version in any language you like, it just appends stdin to a ...


3

Yes smtpd_sender_restrictions to include reject_sender_login_mismatch or reject_authenticated_sender_login_mismatch along with any other restrictions you put in place (order does matter). The table doesn't have to be hash and probably shouldn't be. If your setup is rather simple you will want PCRE or regex. More complicated setups use ldap, mysql,PostgreSQL ...


3

You are looking for an MTA like postfix or exim. Use any decent MTA. The fact that your server will not host the mailboxes itself but forward all mail to external servers should not influence much your choice: You just won't have to install additionnal software like pop server or webmail. You can look at /etc/aliases to forward mail.


3

[root@dev ~]# netstat -tlnp |grep :25 tcp 0 0 127.0.0.1:25 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN 1614/sendmail or [root@dev ~]# lsof -n -i :25 COMMAND PID USER FD TYPE DEVICE SIZE/OFF NODE NAME sendmail 1614 root 4u IPv4 1413591375 0t0 TCP 127.0.0.1:smtp (LISTEN) That should do the trick. If you can't ...



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