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51

Munin and Nagios are really different tools. from munin website: Munin is a networked resource monitoring tool that can help analyze resource trends and "what just happened to kill our performance?" problems. It is designed to be very plug and play. A default installation provides a lot of graphs with almost no work. Nagios is a ...


26

Munin data is stored in Round Robin Database files (.rrd). These are stored under /var/lib/munin. Each host and hostgroup will have it's own subdirectory under /var/lib/munin Delete the .rrd files under the hostname in question, and your data will be zeroed out. Graphs will be re-generated after a few minutes.


24

The 'm' stands for milli, meaning 10^(-3) or 1/1000th of the unit.


15

Just copy the *.rrd files in /var/lib/munin.


13

You are using the EPEL 5 version of the repo instead of 6, go into your /etc/yum.repos.d/epel.repo file and change: mirrorlist=http://mirrors.fedoraproject.org/mirrorlist?repo=epel-5&arch=$basearch to mirrorlist=http://mirrors.fedoraproject.org/mirrorlist?repo=epel-6&arch=$basearch Then run yum clean all and then try and install munin again. ...


13

Enable and disable plugins on each node Graphs are added and removed via symlinks in the /etc/munin/plugins/ directory of the node. To remove a graph you must remove the symlink and restart the node: rm /etc/munin/plugins/diskstats service munin-node restart To add a graph you must add a symlink in the plugins directory to an executable. eg: ln -s ...


12

If you keep the same config, i.e. node names do not change in your /etc/munin/munin.conf file, then it's pretty much just a matter of moving across the contents of /var/lib/munin, which is usually where the RRD files are kept. The graphs will be re-generated from the RRD data so you don't really need those. If your old and new server are not the same ...


11

I concur with lynxman. NAGIOS is for immediate qualitative data (is X OK or not?); munin is for historical quantitative data (how full is X now, and how full has it been this year?). All my NAGIOS installations, some of which monitor several hundred services, are linked to munin systems to do the quantitative monitoring. Note also that munin has specific ...


8

The nginx plugins rely on the following URL to get the status info: http://127.0.0.1/nginx_status Usually, nginx does not have this URL configured to show status data. From the documentation of the plugins, I see that nginx needs to be configured to show status data in a spesific URL. You need to enable nginx status by adding the following lines to ...


8

Disk IOs per device (IOs/second) With traditional hard drives this is a very important number. I/O operation is a read or write operation to disk. With rotational spindles you can get around from dozens to perhaps 200 IOPS per second, depending on the disk speed and its usage pattern. This is not all to it: modern operating systems do have I/O ...


7

Munin definitely works best in parallel with Nagios. It can also tie into it, sending notifications of thresholds being exceeding into the Nagios notification system. The reason we use it is because it is virtually trivial to set up new monitors. Nagios requires a little bit more effort. Note also though that PNP4Nagios gives graphing capabilities to Nagios ...


7

given that you already have a nagios installation, consider nagiosgraph or pnp4nagios. nagiosgraph and pnp4nagios do a pretty nice job of plotting nagios performance data. nagiosgraph has a parameter-based approach to configuration, pnp4nagios has a template-based approach. both automatically detect new hosts/services whenever the nagios configuration ...


7

share my experiences,hope it helps step1: enable tomcat plugins sudo ln -s /usr/share/munin/plugins/tomcat_access /etc/munin/plugins/tomcat_access sudo ln -s /usr/share/munin/plugins/tomcat_jvm /etc/munin/plugins/tomcat_jvm sudo ln -s /usr/share/munin/plugins/tomcat_threads /etc/munin/plugins/tomcat_threads sudo ln -s /usr/share/munin/plugins/tomcat_volume ...


7

Available entropy is utilized by cryptography mainly (to establish SSL connections, for example) and also by every program that calls random() or reads from /dev/random and /dev/urandom. But in your case, I'm thinking that the available entropy is a consequence of mysql slow queries, and not a cause. Entropy is collected by the kernel from sources of ...


6

It sounds like you may have two problems On your monitoring server, recording the metrics for lots of servers requires more random i/o than your storage can provide. Even if all your metrics are being written to disk, the server may be too overloaded to actually generate graphs from them. On your clients being monitored, the plugins which collect the ...


6

I assume you actually want to sample data faster than the default five minutes, because an hourly graph wouldn't show you any more detail than the current daily graph otherwise. There's an easy answer to this and a hard one. The Easy Way Just run munin-update more often and don't upgrade past Munin 1.5. On a lot of Linux systems, this just means editing ...


5

Check out this blog post, it might shed some light on the issue.


5

Export rrd to XML(use rrdtool dump), edit XML file. Then export XML to rdd(use rrdtool restore).


5

The documentation makes reference to two global attributes, graph_width and graph_height. Have you tried changing them? Note that these are global for a particular plugin, not for the whole munin installation; you will need to set them in the config output of a single plugin (or in munin.conf) for them to take effect. Just to check, I put the following ...


5

Wow! How are you measuring load times? As far as I knew nginx would only report request response times ($request_time) which is something completely different. I've not had a good look for a few months, but last time I checked there was very little available for analysing response times. PastMon looks promising. And there are commercial tools like Client ...


5

This can best be answered by quoting Wikipedia Milli (symbol m) is a prefix in the metric system denoting a factor of one thousandth Munin (by default) reads a counter every 5 minutes, and calculates the average between the two last reads. 66m means 66*300 = 19.8 accesses within a five minute period (but the 66 is probably 66.6666, so you'll end up ...


5

Seems like it's trying to actually make requests to the status module. Do you have a proper config for the status location in your VirtualHost? Something like this: <Location /server-status> SetHandler server-status Order deny,allow Deny from all Allow from 127.0.0.1 </Location>


5

You need to upgrade memory if you are suffering from low performance and can determine that the cause is the system's working set exceeding the amount of physical RAM the system has. None of the parameters you are measuring are particularly useful for that purpose. What you want to look at is paging I/O, load average, and so on.


4

netstat doesn't show connections that are passing through the server as a gateway / firewall. The munin-plugin parses /proc/net/ip_conntrack, which contains a lot of information not visible in netstat. The answer; Both are right, but they answer different questions. Netstat talks about connections to and from the server itself. Conntrack provides ...


4

I had a similar problem and had the real plugin in cron writing the data every hour to a temp file and then a reading plugin that ran every 5 minutes from munin, but only displayed the last line from the temp file.


4

Yes, it is done on the server side by creating a combined graph. Basically it is done by describing a new graph in munin server configuration (munin.conf) where the data graphed is the sum of two data sources : [some.machine.boo] total_http_bw.graph_order total_received total_http_bw.graph_title HTTP traffic recived by machine1 and machine2 ...


4

There is a way look: [ppke.hu;All_Totals] update no uptime.graph_title Uptimes uptime.graph_vlabel uptime in days uptime.draw LINE2 uptime.graph_order \ host1=host1.ppke.hu:uptime.uptime \ host2=host2.ppke.hu:uptime.uptime \ host3=host3.ppke.hu:uptime.uptime \ uptime.graph_category system I think you get the idea. Later I replaced ...


4

Well, no such animal existed, so I conjured it. You'll find the latest code in the gist. Enjoy.


4

One way to handle this is by running an snmp agent on your servers, and collecting the results with something like munin or cacti. Here's a decent cacti tutorial which explains how to set up the net-snmp agent on a linux box. The advantage of using snmp is it's a lowest common denominator reporting mechanism for network devices. Almost all networked ...



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