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Found a utility "fatrace" for "file access trace" from the author's blogpost available for download here. It will display all processes accessing whichever files on the system.


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Read your mail on the munin-users mailing list. I may have a former version of Munin ; my configuration looks rather like this: [example.com;totals] lb_cpu.graph_title LB Total User CPU lb_cpu.user.label User CPU lb_cpu.user.sum \ example.com;lb1:cpu.user \ example.com;lb2:cpu.user Maybe it needs the group for each existing ...


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I think the issue here is, in part, what munin means by "open inodes". My default installation of munin has two plugins for getting the number of allocated inodes: "/etc/munin/plugins/open_inodes" which gets the inode metric from "/proc/sys/fs/inode-nr" and "/etc/munin/plugins/df_inode" which gets the metric from the output of "df -i". These numbers are ...


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Count the number of entries in each /proc/[PID]/fd directory. That will give you the number of file descriptors each process has open. While it will take a while to enumerate all processes, missing processes that start or stop while your counting is in progress shouldn't be a problem as you're looking for a long-lived process with a lot of open file ...


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It could be that if it was because of log files, the inodes weren't released when you cleaned them up. Try either restarting the services that had those log files open, or you might be able to truly wipe out the log files without restarting by doing echo "" > logfilenamegoeshere after you've backed up any data you want to save from the log.



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