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0

The WhoISrequest Domain History Checker seems much more comprehensive than the DNS History site. I looked up information on a couple of domain names that I've had registered for over a decade using both tools. DNS History showed information for the first one I checked indicating that its information, which is out of date, was last updated on 2010-08-11. For ...


-4

Erm..... First hit from google (search string mx record lookup) was: http://mxtoolbox.com/ For those who have never used it, it has a history button to show previous mx records for a given domain.


4

Yes, you understand it correctly. Sending E-Mail servers use MX records in order of preference defined within the MX records. The record with smallest precedence is used first, then the second smallest etc. If two servers have equal precedence, the sending server picks a random server from the equal precedence server. You can make forwarding accounts on ...


2

A CNAME record defines that one name is an alias of another name (the canonical name). The implication of having an entire name be an alias is that it cannot also have records of its own, meaning you cannot have those MX records. This is also why you cannot have a CNAME record at the zone apex (where you will always need at least SOA and NS records). You ...


3

With postfix, it's trivial. Just remove example.com from mysql table. For more info about this table, see parameter virtual_mailbox_domains = proxy:mysql:/etc/zpanel/configs/postfix/mysql-virtual_ Disclaimer: This change may cause zpanel to explode stop working, because you dared to change the low level of zpanel system. Because this change was ...


0

Your mail server on Server1 is still configured to be "authoritative" for that domain. Remove that configuration, restart the mail server, and it'll likely start working.


3

The email headers do not directly record the MX record. At best you can infer one or more hosts that were listed in the MX records. In most cases, you will only be able to infer the primary (highest priority) mail server. Some servers do a bad job of reporting their identification, so you may get misleading information. For incoming mail, the host that ...


0

Do not set up an MX record if you don't want to receive mails. Also do not open the SMTP port (25). Some spambots surely will try to send an email to your domani but they will be rejected as there won't be any service to accept them. If you have to operate a mail server anyway set up the mail server to REJECT emails coming to that domain.


4

Never shutdown the old server until you know that the TTL of the MX record pointing to the old server has expired. If the TTL is/was 1 week then leave the old server running for 1 week to catch any emails from clients that may have that MX record cached. When implementing an email cutover always check the MX record during your planning phase and adjust it ...


2

Your scenario is most plausible. Remember that DNS does not "propagate"; rather, records are cached by other DNS servers for the duration of the TTL. So some sites may be caching that old record for as long as a week. (And broken DNS servers may cache it even longer, but those are fortunately few and far between.)


3

Despite what I configure or do. I get always the same result with dig (like if the data comes from other place bit not my zone file): In your output I notice you have 2 dns servers. ;; AUTHORITY SECTION: mydomain.com. 63046 IN NS dns1.kontent.com. mydomain.com. 63046 IN NS dns2.kontent.com. Your domain server is ...



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