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-1

I have found that SOME MX providers in tandem with SOME DNS providers will actually work alongside a bare CNAME, if you merely order the MX record ABOVE the CNAME in the top down record order. It is working on Name.com registrar with Office 365 MX record and bare CNAME record directing HTTP to yet another domain. While testing MX queries I noticed my CNAME ...


0

The MX record should "point" to whichever server handles email for your domain.


1

First, just to be sure: The highest priority is the one with the lowest preference value. Second: Naturally, the first contact for your mail (hightest priority) needs to be your actual mail server, not the web server. Also, you should only list the web server at all as an MX if it is configured to actually handle incoming mail in a meaningful way.


2

This took many, many, many hours of Google-Fu (about 18 hours, give or take). You have to first log in to your Outlook.com account that you're missing your records on. This must be done on a browser that has never logged into Office365 (so either download a new browser and DO NOT import anything, or clear everything out of your main browser). I used MS Edge ...


1

I ran across a website hosted by the Censys Team at the University of Michigan called the Internet-Wide Scan Data Repository. They scan the entire IPv4 address range regularly, checking out websites, open ports, SSL certificates, etc... for each scan they run they also take the time to do a DNS lookup and store the results as a separate package for download. ...


0

There's no way to get that information. Brute force is not an option, because although the list of tlds is public, most tld administrators doesn't publish a list of domains registered under their tld. And access to the mailserver wouldn't really help. First of all many bigger providers (and a lot of hobby set ups, like mine) store that information in a ...


0

I'm afraid you are out of luck. The DNS universe is not locally administered and all the information is not in one place. The number of domains out there now is pretty huge and it would take a very long time to retrieve this information from all the various sites.


2

Is there a non-brute force/case-by-case way of doing this? Assuming you don't have access to the target mailserver, no, there is not.


5

The problem seems to be that you have other servers than your mail server listed in your MX record, one of which has a lower priority. MX records work on a lowest-priority-first basis, which means the internet is first of all trying to send mail for your domain to smtp.secureserver.net., which doesn't seem to know anything about your domain. At this point, ...



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