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0

This works for me - using the mysql socket rather than its port (on a debian machine): check process mysql with pidfile /var/run/mysqld/mysqld.pid group database start program = "/etc/init.d/mysql start" stop program = "/etc/init.d/mysql stop" #if failed host 192.168.1.222 port 3306 protocol mysql then restart if failed unix ...


0

This is the error as it is in the show slave status output: Last_Error: Error 'Cannot add or update a child row: a foreign key constraint fails (dm_752_dbnor1.recursos__, CONSTRAINT recursos___ibfk_1 FOREIGN KEY (id_usuario_creo) REFERENCES usuarios__ (id_usuario))' on query. Default database: 'dm_752_dbnor1'. Query: 'INSERT INTO recursos__ ...


0

No, there are no better options. I mean you can get more beast out of your system if you use RAID 0 (stripe), but that is not a clever idea under a database server, because in RAID 0 if only one disk fails: you lost everything. So, create a RAID 1 device, shut down database, copy over the files, check the permissions, and mount the new device under ...


0

Which version of MySQL server do you use? After 5.5 you can use the performance_schema to get realtime statistics from the database. I'd start querying the table_io_waits_summary_by_table table_io_waits_summary_by_table table_lock_waits_summary_by_table to see what is happening exactly. An another solution would be if you check the buffer pool ...


0

it would be nice to know what commands broke your replication, but I suppose, the mysql_upgrade script would be that rogue. If yes, you can rebuild the mysql package, adding to the post install script a --skip-write-binlog (this is not needed after 5.6.7) But normally I never would just apt-get upgrade a server which is in production, stop the slave, ...


0

There is no side effects if you edit the mysql.user table directly, except one: you have to issue a FLUSH PRIVILEGES; command after you done (to re-read the privilege tables and put your changes online) So the most easiest way would be if you delete the entry itself from mysql user, like DELETE FROM mysql.user WHERE user ='wiki%'; if there is no other ...


0

Sounds like a memory and/or resources problem. No guarantee it will help, but I think it's worth experimenting / checking: Increase the php memory limits by editing the following lines in the php.ini file as: max_execution_time = 30 --> 60 ; memory_limit = 32 --> 128, or even 256M ; Add the following lines to the end of .htaccess file: php_value ...


3

You have to modify mysql.user table, not only the mysql.db. The proper syntax is: RENAME USER 'user'@'192.168.0.10' TO 'user'@'192.168.0.%'; FLUSH PRIVILEGES;


1

If your question is on how to best monitor your server during high peak times, which is hard to do when it is peaking, I'd look for some light-weight tool to help with monitoring. Top, ps, and df don't always cut it. I've used collectd to capture data points on my partitions, memory, cpu's, apache, mysql, and other things. It captures the data and saves ...


0

Yes, there is indeed a navicat.exe file there. Unfortunately they're basically just shipping a windows and wine setup, the start_navicat script should fire it up for you. You might need to open a terminal, navigate to that directory and then run ./start_navicat as I suspect the system won't recognise it as a shell script. There's no installation, afaik, ...


0

I had to make changes for SELinux, my instance was RHEL6. setsebool httpd_can_network_connect=1 setsebool httpd_can_network_connect_db on What I found odd was that SELinux logged nothing unusual to /var/log/audit/audit.log


0

You can't just launch the "Data Sources (ODBC)" console directly. You need to right click it and choose "Run as Administrator" I know you are logged in as an Administrator, but you have to start the process in a way that takes full advantage of that. Alternatively, you can turn UAC off, but that is not recommended.


0

Looking at your details, we can conclude these general recommendations : Your READ : WRITE ratio (61 : 39 ) gives the clue that your engine types should be changed to Innodb. Before that check the output of SHOW ENGINE INNODB STATUS\G; SHOW FULL PROCESSLIST; during peak hours. Most probably you will see queries in LOCK state. Table locks is the one big ...


0

From reading the documentation on MySQL server modes: The MySQL server can operate in different SQL modes, and can apply these modes differently for different clients, depending on the value of the sql_mode system variable. DBAs can set the global SQL mode to match site server operating requirements, and each application can set its session SQL mode to ...


2

I hope it will be helpful to you. try performance_schema = off https://mariadb.com/blog/starting-mysql-low-memory-virtual-machines


0

I know this is a bit old, but its 30/4/2015 and we had the same problem with Percona 5.6. The /etc/init.d/mysql 'start' function has the following (starting ln:112): #wait 10sec before start checking if pid file created or server is dead if [ $dead_check_counter -lt 10 ]; then dead_check_counter=$(( dead_check_counter + 1 )) else if mysqld_status ...


1

You dont mention your distro/kernel version, but it may be worth noting that recent kernels (2.6.38+) have a feature called transparent hugepages. You can tell if it is enabled using: cat /sys/kernel/mm/transparent_hugepage/enabled It pretty much takes all this burden managing and preallocating hugepages of you. You can see how much memory is ...


1

Row 3 : in top command indicates how the cpu is used. Understand each one separately % of the CPU for user processes (2.9%us) % of the CPU for system processes (2.3%sy) % of the CPU processes with priority upgrade nice (0.0%ni) % of the CPU not used (94.7%id) % of the CPU processes waiting for I/O operations(0.0%wa) % of the CPU serving hardware interrupts ...


0

The previous answers were out dated. /etc/my.cnf or on windows ./mysql/my.ini in the [mysqld] section add log_bin general_log log_error the documentation for windows states that the logs get stored in ProgramData/MySQL/MySQL Server 5.6/ ignore it... it's a lie. in addition the recommended log option is depreciated and results in the error ambiguous ...


0

There is a way to allow connection from all IPs when it comes to MySQL. If it in in user definition you need to create your user like this: grant all privileges on databasename.* to 'username'@'%' identified by 'usernamepassword'; flush privileges; This % after @ means there are no restriction on the ip address connecting to DB. You can also take a look ...


0

This is frequently asked question that already has an answer. http://www.debian-administration.org/article/442/Resetting_a_forgotten_MySQL_root_password


0

If you use --skip-grant-tables than you can't change password with set Password = PASSWORD('string'), but you can do UPDATE mysql.user set Password = <HASHED_STRING> where User = <ADMIN_USER> AND Host = 'localhost'; You can create hashed string with following command select PASSWORD('test'); +-------------------------------------------+ | ...


0

It can be that sometime the iSCSI connection use some more time to go up, and the MySQL service "race ahead" of the iSCSI mounting. After boot, try to restart MySQL: if during boot it did not start properly, but from the shell it starts without problem, than you confirm that we have a timing issue. Another possibility: did you reach the iSCSI mount using ...


1

I would personally strip all of your iptables configuration and start again, using this documentation for reference. For good practice, I would operate a "default deny" rule, and explicitly allow connections for the services you want to run (for example, ports 22 and 3306 for SSH and MySQL respectively). As per this guide (bear in mind the commands may need ...


0

The solution was very simple, I just stop using localhost and changed to the actual IP address.


-1

There is no database on the world which had its data in .sql files. They use their highly optimized binary format. It is in most cases in /var/lib/mysql, but it depends a lot from your actual distribution and even from your server environment. You can easily find out, where are the actual database by asking their list with an lsof -p <pid> command of ...


1

You have to add username@% record where "%" is the wildcard meaning "from anywhere". Or, more securely, you can add record like username@11.22.33.44 or username@mydomain.tld


0

The statement of "Access denied for user 'username'@'localhost' (using password: YES)", can surface even before a connection is even made to the database server. I am going to guess this is most likely the issue since I am guessing you know the correct password and I will also make the assumption that you know you have the correct permissions to the tables ...


4

Somehow Google knew this already as first result on search mariadb file location: The data directory location is controlled by the datadir variable. Look at your /etc/mysql/my.cnf file to see where your installation of MariaDB is configured to store data. The default is /var/lib/mysql but it is often changed, like for example if you are using a ...


0

These are the files and folders I deleted: bin folder: All *.pdb files docs folder include folder lib folder mysql-test folder share folder: Removed languages folders except english and spanish. share\charsets folder sql-bench folder A month later using mysql, I have not had any problems.


1

Use svndbadmin purge REPOS-PATH. From the output of svndbadmin when not provided any arguments: Purge information specific to the repository located at REPOS-PATH from the database. Assuming you have multiple repositories, this will allow you to purge the details for one specific repository without impacting the rest of your commit database.


0

mysqld tries to determine your timezone at startup. You can see these values with: SELECT @@global.time_zone, @@session.time_zone; You can set the timezone per-session or globally at runtime: SET GLOBAL time_zone = timezone; You can, and it seems you should, set it in the config file: default-time-zone='+0:00' The documentation says these are valid ...


2

You can not attach two different security labels to the same directories. So, you had to select a single label and let the other process to read/write the files with that label. Problem is that doing that you are effectively granting the second process read/write access to the files owned by the first process, which is exactly what you don't want to do. ...


0

With innodb you might be filling your transaction log (innodb_log_size). While inserting, InnoDB first writes everything to the transaction log. Once in the log transactions get applied to the database itself. So that if server crashes mid-transaction, it can replay the log (reapply the transactions) to keep the data consistent. This actually means, every ...


0

Increase the pool size can surely have a very pronounced influence on InnoDB performance. Try to increase it to 128/256 MB and retry your test. Here you can found some more informations.


0

I had the same problem and found out a few things after digging around. MariaDB is a drop-in replacement for mysql. On the new system, mysql is the MariaDB client (although I'm not clear on what that means). Checking to see if the service was running: service mysqld status which indicated: Redirecting to /bin/systemctl status mysqld.service ...


0

You should analyze your most frequent queries with EXPLAIN command. The output will tell you how your queries use table indices, which directly affects the performance.


0

What happens: you have try to put an elefant into the hamster's ball. What to do: decrease the memory footprint for mysql . . . . . . . . . . [mysqld] user = mysqluser pid-file = /var/run/mysqld/mysqld.pid socket = /var/run/mysqld/mysqld.sock log_error = /var/log/mysql/error.log ...


0

if you hard drive is on local RAID - check if the battery status is fine - and the local cache is enabled - otherwise your writes are going to be much slower also use mpstat -P ALL to see if all the cores are equally busy at peak time


0

If you are able to play around with settings a little, I would try this in my.cnf: innodb_buffer_pool_size = 3000M then restart mysql and check your performance. This would allow you to keep much more of your database in memory, reducing the disk/memory thrashing that you may be seeing. Given that you have 4Gb memory, and assuming this server is ONLY a ...


1

To be honest the cause could be dozens of different things, you really need to systematically profile each component and narrow down where latencies are being introduced, rather than trying to guess where the problem is. Having said that, here's two things that come to mind: ELB does not scale instantly If you're using ELB (which I'm assuming you are) you ...


2

I suspect that you have several issues here that are stacking up and causing problems. Disk i/o is fragmented, and probably inefficient. OPTIMIZE TABLE on each of your tables should sort that out and help a bit. Memory is tuned horribly, likely causing issues with having to swap frequently. Slow queries - this is the big suspect for your high CPU usage. ...


0

You SHOULD have indices for every column involved into the search. When you search in the column that has no index, search if performed by "filesort" that is not very efficient for FTS.


3

Below is link to a great article that will help determine the right settings for the mpm_prefork_module. The idea is to run a script that will show you how much memory is consumed by each Apache process, then using that information to configure the settings. http://cloudinservice.com/tune-apache-performance-using-mpm-prefork-module/ Script: ...


2

There can be several solutions to your problem. You could try tweaking settings (allowing mysql to use more ram, making sure it doesn't swap, adding indexes) or altering the hardware (more ram, faster disks). Another option is to set up a mysql slave to run the heavy read queries on, that way you can still update the master with read+write queries while ...


36

Maria-DB is not a performance-enhanced MySQL version. Maria-DB is the forked MySQL version current used in the open-source space. It was forked from MySQL due to mistrust in how Oracle will behave in regard of the original MySQL code. You can see here for more information. While until version 5.1 both were more or less the same code, by 5.5 this changed ...


2

I suspect you may be running too high load for a t2 instance type. These instances are given cpu time based on a credit system, and t2.micros are have the least overall cpu capability in the instance class. These credits are accumulated at a rate of 6 per hour on a t2.micro, which gives you the ability to burst to 100% of the cpu core for 6 minutes. All ...


0

I found this metod, from http://mysqladministrators.blogspot.it/2012/02/get-database-size.html I'm not sure if it could help you, since i'm not so prepared in MySql Get the database size, free space and last update To get the current database size just by querying into your query browser or CLI from the INFORMATION_SCHEMA database in table TABLES. SELECT ...


0

I think not in that case you think. You can't use a MySQL replication if you write on all nodes. Then you get inconsistent data. The only way is to write a script which sync all your data and look for new customers and add them to the main database with all relations.


0

Magento is kind of a resource hog. Anyways, from what I recall, there are plugins for Magento that optimize not only the site (PHP), but also background processes such as MySQL. Im saying this because if it happens every day at the exact same time, then its Magento launching a query, its not a MySQL issue. Personally, I would either A: 1: Install ...



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