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The check_http plugin will only see what wget/curl shows you, so it cannot check what you want it to check. If you want a check that can actually run client-side javascript, you'll need to look into something like Selenium and check_selenium (as discussed in this post), or maybe Sahi and Sakuli.


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The # is in anchor, that's correct. Those are to be interpreted by the client, not the server. The anchor is part of the site,so one has to load the whole site and search for the anchor in it. You should use the following check instead: check_http -H www.example.com -f follow -p 8080 -u /hello/ Later you could add -s world to search for "world" in the ...


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Nagios now has a solution that integrates tightly with Nagios Core, XI, etc. Nagios Log Server which can alert on any query on any log file on any system in your infrastructure.


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You could use "Custom Variable Macros" (http://nagios.sourceforge.net/docs/3_0/macros.html) In your ping service definition use e.g.: check_command check_ping!200.0,20%!$_HOSTVAR_SERVICE_PING_CRITICAL_RTA$,40% In your host template set a default value: _VAR_SERVICE_PING_CRITICAL_RTA 500 In the host definition that should use a difference value set ...


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That error indicates that you don't have the external script handler enabled. Fortunately, nsclient++ has excellent documentation on this subject. (Looks like they're currently in the process of re-doing the wiki/docs, so you might want to check the old one too if something's missing.)


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You can always define a new custom command using the same plugin that the existing command does. In this command you can pass to the -H switch something other than an actual $HOSTADDRESS$, like $ARG1$ or whatever.


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When configuring Nagios, you would typically want to use the $HOSTADDRESS$ macro. They are essentially variables internal to Nagios and enumerated at run time. This allows the commands to run with no further interaction from you, as Nagios will find the hostname or IP in your configuration and replace $HOSTADDRESS$ with the specific system's information. You ...


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In the service definition you put the host_name of the host where the service is running that you want to check. The check_command definition my_command!whatever will pass whatever to the command definition as $ARG1$. Add more !more for $ARG2$, etc. You need to pass the needed parameters to my_shell_script.sh in the command definition. You have access to ...


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Take a look at the ansible documentation regarding dynamic inventories. The actual implementation is, of course, up to you. There have been attempts at implementing something similar.


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I finally and belatedly realised that if I can traceroute through a host, I should also be able to traceroute to that host, and on testing, verified that this is indeed the case. All the traceroute-related plugins I could find on places like NAGIOS exchange are more sophisticated than this; they want to verify things like the identity of the first or second ...


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After talking with @mdpc, I double checked Nagios Documentation. It is not made clear or in your face at all, but it says this: By default, Nagios expects the CGI configuration file to be named cgi.cfg and located in the config file directory along with the main config file. I moved the cgi.cfg and nagios.cfg back into the same directory and it went ...


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The bug is still there. Another fast solution is to put the variable before the command definition in the nrpe.cfg configuration file: command[check_something]=HOME=/home/user /home/user/script.sh


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You may try installing the NRPE together with the nagios plugins in the monitored server. The simplest way to check whether a process is running is to add something like the following line inside nrpe.conf: command[check_myprocess]=/usr/lib/nagios/plugins/check_procs -c 1: -C myprocname -a stringinmyprocargs Then you can add the following inside your ...


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When I add -d SHOWALL to my check command, so it's like: check_command check_nt!SERVICESTATE!-d SHOWALL -l MSSQL\\$$instance then nagios (in check_mk) shows: No service/process specified Do you know what can cause this problem? Solution Finally I've found the soultion. It turns out the problem was in check_nt command definition. Oryginally I've used ...


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I had to trial and error this one. What works for me is MSSQL\\$Instance as in check_command check_nt!SERVICESTATE!-d SHOWALL -l MSSQL\\$Instance


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Figured it out. I had to add "cn" to the AuthLDAPURL as well as add in a AuthLDAPRemoteUserAttribute. Now Nagios (well Apache) will see the REMOTE_USER environment variable as the cn AuthLDAPURL "ldap://my.ldap.server:389/dc=my_dc,dc=my_dc,dc=net?sAMAccountName,cn?sub" NONE AuthLDAPRemoteUserAttribute cn


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You can use Nagios plugins to monitor the server via IPMI. Also, Supermicro has it's own monitoring software called SuperDoctor, which also relies on IPMI. More Details: http://exchange.nagios.org/index.php?option=com_mtree&task=search&Itemid=74&searchword=ipmi http://www.supermicro.com/products/nfo/SMS_SD3.cfm ...


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Rrdtool graph has some "smarts" about the Y axis to prevent the labels all turning into weird numbers with odd decimals. So it prefers to go up to 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, etc. The docs describe this as "normally the scale is selected from a predefined set of ranges". The upper graph has a max around 12k so that gets rounded up to 20k. There is an option to ...


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Turns out the puppet module https://github.com/thias/puppet-nagios has a bug causing the commands to be referenced from a non existent folder /usr/libexec/nagios/plugins/' vs/usr/lib64/nagios/plugins/`.


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You should be able to use JMX to check on the app itself. There are a lot of resources for JMX monitoring in Nagios Exchange, but I couldn't recommend a specific plugin. At a higher level, you might want to use check_multi to check them as a service cluster. Neither of these will get you a Cognos-specific "is this the master?" functionality, though. You'd ...


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I was missing the perl and perl-devel packages.


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Are the two servers hosted in public network?. If so, there are few online URL monitoring sites are available to keep monitoring of the server availability round the clock and alert via an email when the server in not responding state. This works only when the server hosted in public network. And the configuration of Primary and Secondary server URL must be ...


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No, you can't have a service be checked even if the host is down. There's an implied dependency for all services on a given host. To answer your second question: Services have their own notifications_enabled setting, so you can have services notify even if their parent host doesn't. However, if it's not defined, it will inherit from the host. (There are ...


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The way to do this depends on where your thresholds are defined. If they're defined on the host being checked, e.g., hard-coded in nrpe.cfg, then you need to keep two copies of nrpe.cfg and rotate them on a schedule. (And restart NRPE every time it swaps.) This can be done with a cron job and a simple bash script. If you have NRPE accepting args, and are ...


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The IP matching DNS service should be connected to a fake host called "DNS" or something; and use a dummy check for the fake "DNS" host that just does an "exit 0". You could also connect it to your real DNS server: if that server is down then there's not much point in trying to check the DNS.


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I have been looking into this in the past and it appears there is no built-in solution (I might be wrong though!). What I ended up doing is creating two different configuration files for the service, I then added a cron job that would run each Friday and Sunday night to swap the two files and reload nagios (service nagios reload). The swapping can for ...



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