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If you only monitor datacenter A from datacenter B you introduce a possibly unwanted component into your measurement namely the health of the internet. My strategy is to monitor A from A and B from B. This gives you the most accurate sense of how your data center functions internally. There is still value in monitoring the health of your datacenters from ...


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You should take a look at following: Distributed Monitoring Distributed Monitoring Solutions For Nagios - Nagios Library distributed monitoring | Nagios Library - Nagios Library


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I think the best solution is to have a nagios instance on each DC and monitor both DC from every instance. With this solution you can still monitor each DC separately if the connectivity is lost and if one nagios machine break In our company we have 2 Nagios server for this purpose.


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Do you have a typo in your nagios config, where an errant cut/paste switched radius and redis? If you wanted to test this directly, you could try supplying the options meant for check_redis to a command-line test of check_radius and check the error received. I recommend looking at your nagios config files closely to make sure you didn't use radius in place ...


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here is an existing article on server fault, but it refers to nagios core. It inserts hosts automatically using REGEX, as long as your windows servers have a common naming convention it could work. Nagios Multiple servers config files


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I think the redis service can also run with name redis. So it could be. define service { use generic-service host_name ARGPLUS_REDIS_SLV service_description Redis Service check_command check_service.sh!linux!"service redis status" ...


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Correct way is to edit a file called checkcommands.cfg, (create file if not available) located in the /etc folder within nagios folder. Create your command with variables & point to actual script. Example: define command { command_name check_http command_line /usr/local/nagios/libexec/check_http $ARG1$ } Also make sure you ...


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You can set an interval in which the passive check changes state if the server has not received any passive checks in that time interval. This is known as freshness in Nagios 3.0 terminology. Nagios check freshness documentation When the freshness interval expires w/o a passive check, naigos runs the "active" check for the service. You can set this to ...


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Just changing the filenames will break all sorts of things in the web interface. Starting with viewing old logs, as you mentioned, but also including all of the trend graphs, availability reports, alert history, notification history, etc. You'd have to modify date format in the source and recompile to fix all of this. A better option is to set use_syslog=1 ...


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In your host config, add a custom variable like so: define host { use abc host_name test alias /test/ address 192.168.0.24 hostgroups testgroup _port 8080 } Then in your services.cfg, swap the port out for the variable you've ...


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In your nagios.cfg file, you can add a line pointing to the hostgroups.cfg file you created, thus telling nagios to include that file. cfg_file=/usr/local/nagios/etc/hostgroups.cfg You can also specify a directory, and nagios will process any of the files found within: cfg_dir=/usr/local/nagios/etc/directory_containing_cfg_files


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You shouldn't be using hpacucli these days. The correct modern tool is hpssacli. Also, there are more efficient ways to check the hardware RAID controller status. What OS/distribution/version are you running? Do you have the other management agents installed?


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Ironically, the reason this works on our other HPraid hosts is that they're running newer versions of hpacucli, which apparently don't use iopl(). Upgrading hpacucli on these older hosts resolved the problem. The mystery of how to selectively allow iopl() remains. Perhaps for another day.



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