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Just like Keith said, you can do this by loading the kernel IPMI. You can do this or via Nagios, but I recommend you try out Pandora FMS and their take on IPMI. Pandora FMS is a lesser known monitoring solution I've been testing and tinkering around with, and I'm starting to recommend it as an alternative to others.


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so, first thanks to all who helped me. it wasn't a nagios problem. summary: nagios check for each service worked fine the mailscript sends the mail via console (with or without parameter) nagios fired the event and executed the mailscript fine that was really confusing. in my desperation i added a global exception handler in the mailscript, which ...


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You can use one of the various check_ipmi variants run via NRPE or check_by_ssh (at least in Linux) if you load the kernel IPMI module. Start by loading (i.e., modprobe) ipmi_devintf and ipmi_si. Some of the checks use ipmitools, others might use openipmi or freeipmi. You'll have to hunt around for one that meets your needs. (They may also be able to ...


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Self-answering: turns out this is linked to update checking (Cf), and can easily be mitigated with the check_for_update flag in nagios.cnf.


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Needed to delete the character ; at the end of the query to get it to work. Didn't understand why, but "select * from nagioscheck;" returned an error and "select * from nagioscheck" works.


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A lot of how-to's here and there ask you to allow your monitoring server IP like this in your host's /etc/nagios/nrpe.cfg : allowed_hosts=127.0.0.1, 1.2.3.4 On some distribs (Ubuntu 14.04 LTS for instance), it's working. On other (Ubuntu 12.04 LTS - tested on Microsoft Azure in my case), it does not. Just remove the space before second IP : ...


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No, you should not do this. Let your router be a router and install nagios elsewhere. Installing extra, non-stock software on an appliance not only decreases the security of the platform, but also introduces many complexities in performing upgrades.


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What you want are Service Dependencies. If you're configuring many of these, you might want to use Service Groups to make your life easier. See the Time-Saving Tricks For Object Definitions page for examples.


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You're not doing anything wrong. It's just that the host expects the specified IP (or name, for that matter) to be local, i.e. attached to some local interface. One way to spoof the host could be to temporarily set up some alias interface with the desired IP address, e.g. for 1.2.3.4 on Linux: ifconfig lo:0 1.2.3.4 netmask 255.255.255.248


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Non-root users don't see any output from lsof -i. (Confirmed on Debian 8 and Cent 7, without SELinux.) If you wanted to use this in a nagios check, you'd have to run lsof through sudo. If sudo is configured to require a tty (might be the default on CentOS), you can do something like this: Defaults:nagios !requiretty nagios ALL=NOPASSWD:/usr/bin/lsof ...


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There doesn't seem to be a flag you can pass to configure for this, but inside the script it uses a variable called PGSQL to store its hard-coded assumptions on where to find postgresql. Running configure like this let me change the path and build check_pgsql. PGSQL=/usr/pgsql-9.3 ./configure --therestofyourflagshere


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I had this same issue and could not figure out how to change the password for monitoring through the web-interface. However, I tracked down the user/password file on the nagiosxi server and changed it there and all is good. To find where the password file is located to change, go to one of the Service reporting the error, go to the configuration tab and ...


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I experienced the same problem - and it turned out that the problem was not that the files have to be in a specific path, but to the contrary - I was trying to use a resource.cfg file from a path that was also scanned using the cfg_dir definition - which resulted in an error as $USERX$=xxx starts with an invalid token as far as object definitions go in ...



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