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33

Glue records only ever exist in the parent zone of a domain name. Hence in the case of your example.org domain name, first find the .org name servers: % dig +short org. NS a0.org.afilias-nst.info. a2.org.afilias-nst.info. b0.org.afilias-nst.org. b2.org.afilias-nst.org. c0.org.afilias-nst.info. d0.org.afilias-nst.org. Then, for as many of these as you ...


6

To check if a GLUE record is setup: dig +trace @a.root-servers.net ns0.nameserverhere.com If the GLUE is setup you should see a record that ends with: “Recevied XXX bytes from x.GTLD-SERVERS.NET.” There is also sites which will do it for you such as http://www.intodns.com/


6

There is no ordering to the individual resource records of a resource record set. The notions of "primary" and "secondary" DNS content servers only apply to database replication. A resource record set is a set. Sets are not required to be ordered, and they are not ordered when it comes to the Domain Name System. There are numerous points in the path ...


5

There isn't a predictable order to how authoritative name servers are queried. With the setup you described, if ns3.freedns.ws doesn't have a record for your domain name then roughly 1/3 of the visitors trying to get to your site will be unable to because the name server will respond that it does not have an IP address for your domain name. I'd suggest ...


5

You can (and you should!) run sysprep before capturing the master image, and then customize the installation using sysprep.inf, leaving the fields for computer name and domain blank; this way, all other installation steps will be automated, but computer name and domain will be asked during setup.


5

nslookup will return what the name servers actually return (as the name implies), but that's not the whole picture of name resolution. The hosts file takes priority, and netbios can be used, too. As you've said, ping is working correctly, as should other applications that use the OS's name resolution functionality. nslookup's ignoring of the hosts file is ...


5

Without attempting to detract from the other answers: if it's available for sale, buy the domain. With the new .TLD craziness, internal domain names that have been working correctly for years are going to stop working intermittently when people are off-site and it will be because some enterprising company somehow managed to get .internal or .devel or ...


4

Here is a little shell script which implements Alnitak's answer: #!/bin/sh S=${IFS} IFS=. for P in $1; do TLD=${P} done IFS=${S} echo "TLD: ${TLD}" DNSLIST=$(dig +short ${TLD}. NS) for DNS in ${DNSLIST}; do echo "Checking ${DNS}" dig +norec +nocomments +noquestion +nostats +nocmd @${DNS} $1 NS done Pass the name of the domain as parameter: ./...


3

Exactly. You have to create NS records (and glue records) at the registrar that designate your server as the name server for your domain.


3

As the section of the appendix you linked to states, it's strongly recommended to enable or disable the consistent network device naming feature at install time; doing so after installation is messy and not guaranteed to work, as you've discovered. To do this, install the system passing biosdevname=0 on the boot command line when booting the installation ...


3

Why don't you use godaddy's public facing DNS servers and use your server for your internal purposes? That would probably be the easiest way to get the functionality you're looking for. Assuming you're hosting a website, set the A record to point to your server's WAN IP.


3

You can have name resolution across a network only in two ways: a central DNS server or local hosts files in each computer. If you can create a DNS server and force all computers to use it (f.e. via DHCP), you're ok. If you can edit the hosts file on each computer, you're ok. If you can't do any of those, I'm afraid you're not ok...


2

As has been mentioned, You should use sysprep on the master computer that you're generating the image from. Not only does sysprep handle the generation of a new, unique SID for each machine but it also allows mini-setup to run on each machine so that the hardware can be detected and the correct drivers installed. Using an image without sysprep may lead to ...


2

Depends on what you mean by Domain. Oracle neither knows nor cares about Windows domains. However there is a DB_DOMAIN database parameter used for networked databases And there are various ways for clients to connect to Oracle databases (or at least finding out where the database is to connect to) which could also impact database naming. It can also ...


2

SQL Server does cache the user tokens indeed. You can force them to clean up with DBCC FREESYSTEMCACHE('USERSTORE_TOKENPERM');


2

dig +trace is generally the most straightforward way to inspect the chain of delegations. However, glue records are in the additional section and by default trace output does not include the additional section. You will need to specify explicitly that you want this included in the output. dig +trace +additional example.com If the idea is to check the ...


2

DNS settings, as a general rule, are machine-wide. You could turn off your DNS resolution, filter it, or give false answers -- but I bet you don't want to do that. I think your best answer is to run them with lookups disabled (e.g., netstat -n) and then run the output through a script that checks against /etc/hosts and does the proper replacements.


2

I have the same problem but I fixed it. You must add DNS in interface. It here: /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0 add line: DNS1=xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx And then you must restart network service.


2

That name is for internal use only, and it's not supposed to be explicitly used anywhere, especially in URLs, which should be configured using the server's internal hostname and/or public-facing FQDN. I don't know what you're using that name for, but you should stop doing that, and configure your Exchange server in a proper way.


2

Yes, that's entirely possible. It's not necessarily a good idea though. Quite the opposite in most cases (as is running your own name servers in general, for small setups).


1

What you want to achieve is called "split DNS" (or "DNS shadowing", or with various other names): you need to create a "domain.com" zone in your internal DNS server, so that it can provide different answers to your internal computers instead of the standard answers everyone gets when resolving those names from the Internet (f.e. having "mail.domain.com" ...


1

The reason for this could be, that your internal DNS resolves to the public IP-addresses which are not reachable from the inside directly for routing reasons. A solution would be using a so called DNS-view, if you use bind8 or bind9. With views, your DNS can answer with different IP-addresses for the same servername, depending on the source IP-address of ...


1

Perform an nslookup on the domain name of the web site. Look at who owns the domain name, (which name servers are hosting those record) then contact that company (look at the SOA records for example). Also look at who owns the IP (perform a whois search against the IP returned when performing a DNS A record query against the web site address) and contact ...


1

The mapping between interface names and devices can be seen in /sys/class/net/ Example: $ ls -la /sys/class/net total 0 drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 0 Oct 29 12:49 . drwxr-xr-x 56 root root 0 Oct 29 12:49 .. lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 Oct 29 12:49 eth0 -> ../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:19.0/net/eth0 lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 Oct 29 12:49 lo -> ../../...


1

Using this: https://www.centos.org/modules/newbb/viewtopic.php?topic_id=39343 I found a key command that helped me troubleshoot: [root@localhost ~]# wget -6 URL -Failed [root@localhost ~]# wget -4 URL -Worked It's something to do with the default ipv6 stack that's causing problems with certain utils. Disable ipv6 to resolve.


1

Stop the firewall first. Always get that out of the way when troubleshooting network issues (whenever possible). If you drop the firewall and your issue goes away, problem solved, if not, at least it's out of the way for now. 1) iptables -L see if there are any DROP rules that could be affecting outgoing packets 2) Check to see if selinux is running and ...


1

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1

The transfer will be complete when: the WHOIS name servers are right (123-reg dns o what you specified) the above name servers are properly configured I don't know the Fasthosts control panel but usually the domain is in the list until the domain contract expires.


1

If it has been more than 24 hours I would recommend asking 123-reg to confirm the transfer has happened correctly and the correct IPS Tag has been used. If it has been less than 24 hours then just wait. On a side note when you say that it hasn't disappeared from Fasthosts and appeared in 123-reg are you looking at the domain name part of the control panel ...


1

You need to do authentication via HTTP headers for apache to log the info in the user field of the http logs. If the login to the application is via a form/cookies then apache does not consider the user authenticated.



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