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libc must be recompiled after redefining MAXDNSRCH and defdname in resolv.h in the package, and then re-packaged. Do not modify /usr/include/resolv.h, but rather resolv.h in the package which delivers it. For example, if one is on an RPM-based operating system, one would download the .srpm, install it locally, modify the source code, re-archive it and ...


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https://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2181.txt The domain name used as the value of a NS resource record, or part of the value of a MX resource record must not be an alias. Not only is the specification clear on this point, but using an alias in either of these positions neither works as well as might be hoped, nor well fulfills the ambition ...


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It's not clear where do you run the ping. But your assumption that client tries to get the ip of the server from the master dns server is plain wrong. DNS client contacts the servers of /etc/resolv.conf and only these servers. The server makes a choice to respond in only one of these ways: if it is a master for the domain, it responds based on it's ...


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I suggest using a Reverse Proxy, in your case Application Request Routing, an free IIS addon from Microsoft. You pick one of your three servers and give it the public IP. Install and setup ARR to handle all requests and forward them to any of the three end-points. This is a free solution in terms of hard- and software but you need to learn about ARR. I ...


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I personally would do a reverse proxy, but if you want to avoid that then an alternative to the other suggestions would be to run each server on a different port and pay for a service like No-IP that will do host redirects from Port 80 to another port. Basically, host1.domain.com can be pointed to your ip:81 and users won't know a difference. It works, ...


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If you want to access each by the same external IP address then you'll have to use different ports and use port based NATing. If you can use different host names/domain names then you can setup a reverse proxy to hand off the requests to the different servers based on the host names. e.g. server1.example.com, server2.example.com, etc To do that you'll ...


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I am going to make some assumptions here. You state "we have three separate servers that house IIS currently. Each of these three servers have the same public IP address" which I assume means they are only public facing for very specific services. They are probably allowing external on port 80, 433, and possibly a few others. If that is the case, I would not ...


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You can run them all on different ports or you can put a reverse proxy in front of them. Using different ports is the easiest, but then your users need to know the port as well as the name to reach the right server. The reverse proxy rules determine which internal IIS server to fetch based on the hostname requested.



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