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NFS doesn't save file modification times or attributes like that. If you need it, use a LUN and iSCSI to a server that can host the files and use a filesystem that does this (NTFS, etc).


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Some thoughts... Can you access the resource using its fully-qualified name, e.g.: net view \\mynas.mydomain.com Assuming you're not already doing this, and this actually works, I'd be thinking along the lines of NetBIOS over TCP/IP (NBT) vs SMB. When using the short name, it might be your server trying to access the NAS box via NBT (TCP 137), as ...


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Sounds like a WINS problem. Ping uses DNS, while CIFS uses WINS. Are both the NAS and the server in the same workgroup/domain?


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IPV6 has been known to cause some dns related issues, where you can/can't nslookup the host, browse by host, ping by host. If this is a non-prod box, try disabling IPV6 on the NAS and your client host.


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Sounds alot like the dns for the iscsi device is now expired. That explains the ip only access. Try putting the names in the c:\windows\system32\drivers\etc\hosts file. Format is: name ip, like: theiscsidevice 1.2.3.4 Try to ping by name, it should then start working


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No the existing data will not be erased when you add a disk to the SHR array. The message is simply saying the new drive being added will be formatted. You data and applications will actually remain available during the expansion process; there is no need at all to even stop using the NAS whilst SHR Vertical Expansion is taking place. That said - before ...


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NET USE does not allow you to connect to the same server with different credentials. This is because it reuses the same relationship to map additional shares on the same server. You can work around this by making windows think it's a different server either by creating DNS aliases for the same NAS with different names or editing the hosts file on the ...


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I cannot say specifically, however - if you add a disk to a RAID config, it'll need to be wiped to become part of your RAID. Losing that data is - as you surmised - inevitable. When it comes to the original data though, the answer is a little more complex - RAID, depending on type, will differ in where it writes data in a two drive configuration, as opposed ...


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No. A NAS is a specialized appliance with a vendor-supplied firmware. It is not a general-purpose server. Of course, since most NAS appliances are coming with off-the-shelf hardware nowadays, you should be able to hack a NAS appliance into a simple Linux install, but you obviously will lose all support from the vendor. It also typically is not worth the ...


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Something like this? This command can be cronned: http://stackoverflow.com/a/14731180/696680 Be carefull that you still need to find *.avi (or whatever your extension is) files AND that you will need to do a "cd [path]" first!


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Storage performance isn't always about throughput... So to reality... Today, I would likely build a NAS solution for the client set you have with dual bonded 10GbE connections to a pair of cross-stacked switches (or a chassis switch). It's not like you have that many options... NAS --- 2 x 10GbE ---> switch --- 1GbE ---> computing workstations ...


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You need to some data collection. This can take basically take 4 forms that I can think of. A combination of them might be best, but individually I'm listing them from what I consider to be worst to best. Ask the vendor (or a set of vendors) and base it on what they tell you. They should all have calculators for guessing this sort of load. They might even ...



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