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So many things: Switches don't give computers internet access. Switches provide physical connectivity to the physical network. Routers give computers internet access. Your computers all need to have a valid ip address configuration. If the switch has internet access then most of the work is already done. All you need to do is to give the computers a ...


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You can create a port group on your virtual switch that uses the host NIC on your physical lan as its uplink. Then all VM's can be connected to that port group and will be able to use addresses on your LAN as if they were real devices. If you wanted to go for a routed set up then you can create another vSwitch (or port group on the same switch) with a ...


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On your Hyper-V host, install Routing and Remote Access. Then you can use RRAS to NAT from your public IP address inside to your virtual machines, using the IP addresses assigned to their virtual network adapters. However, beware! Installing RRAS from a remote session often locks you out as you configure RRAS as your session becomes invalid under the new ...


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You could always spin up a virtual firewall/router VM with two NICs, and route through to the VMs. PFSense plays nicely with hyper-v 2012r2+ and is incredibly easy to setup and manage.


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Did you check your routes eg default gateway? Check route -n. Otherwise you could try setting a rule to route back the packets from the established connections. iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o eth1 -j MASQUERADE iptables -A FORWARD -i eth1 -o eth0 -m state --state RELATED,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT iptables -A FORWARD -i eth0 -o eth1 -j ACCEPT


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The Wireshark screenshot on the FTP server is interesting -- the lack of a response suggests that it either can't (routing/NAT issues) or won't (firewall) respond. My ideas: Does the FTP server have a local firewall (check with iptables -L -vn) dropping any traffic? If iptables's INPUT or OUTPUT chains have the DROP policy but you don't have rules allowing ...


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Sharing your findings did help someone! :) Fixed the exact issue I was facing!! Thanks for posting the solution!!! Here is what I needed to additionally do to forward packets to the other side: on the left side, enable forwarding echo 1 > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward allocate an EIP (1.1.1.1) and associate to eth0 interface on AWS instance add ...


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Your diagram uses x/29 and y/30 while the text uses y/29 and z/30, and your update saying x/29 uses a y/30 gateway further confuses things as you cannot use a gateway on another subnet. Perhaps adding IPs and netmasks would help. I shall assume a/24, b/24, x/29, y/30 and that the gateway you are referring to is the router with x/29 and y/30 interfaces. ...


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You could use socat to forward that port to your game server: socat UDP4-RECVFROM:27015,fork UDP4-SENDTO:x.x.x.x:27015 Note that x.x.x.x will see the requests coming from your reverse proxy. It won't see the original IP address. Also, no idea what performance implications this has.


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If 10.10.10.10 already points to the WAN interface on your router, you should just have to add a static route to the internal host on the router. ip router add 10.10.10.10/32 dev eth1 Where eth1 is the LAN side nic on the router. (Ensure that ip forwarding is on for both interface wan and lan on the router). Then just assign 10.10.10.10/32 to the nic on ...


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What you are describing is called SNAT or 1:1 NAT in other terms. It maps a single address on one network, to a single address on another and is the most common way to expose services on a single host (usually to the internet) on the planet. So providing your gateway supports it, you need to create a 1:1 NAT of 10.10.10.10 to 192.168.1.2. All traffic to ...


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Not getting far enough to be MTU-related. You're sending a SYN, getting a SYN ACK in reply, then RSTing the connection rather than completing the TCP handshake. Something is aborting the connection. That's an unusual circumstance, nothing about that suggests a specific cause. Looks like that capture reference point is your WAN, try the same on LAN to see ...


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Translate a whole network range is possible by using static NAT (aka Net Static). Anyway the problem here is that old network is a /8, while the new can be 172.16.0.0/12 at most (you forgot to specify this). So, unless you want to specify the translation of each IP needed, a good idea could be to select a subnet of 10.0.0.0/8 with the same size of your new ...


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Since you are not being provided DHCP through the wall LAN port you'll have to do one of the following: Connect a switch to the wall LAN port and configure a static IP, gateway, netmask, and DNS servers on each computer. Each computer will require its own static IP. Connect a router to the wall LAN port and use it to provide NAT for the computers. I'm ...



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