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If it's HTTP(S) traffic, a HTTP Proxy will do (Apache mod_proxy, HAProxy, IIS, among others) If it's other type of traffic, you could NAT it to the other box Similar to: Forward all TLD requests to another server


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You can put a route-map on NAT. What I'm not sure about is what conditions are valid to match upon in the route map to do conditional NAT (whether DSCP bits, etc are valid comparisons). Check out the example below and see if you can give it a try relative to your objective. https://supportforums.cisco.com/document/26021/how-configure-static-nat-route-maps ...


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Assuming you control the print server code then, sure, you can have the print server connect out to your servers obviating the need to worry about NAT in the remote networks. This is, for example, how "GoToMyPC" and "LogMeIn" work-- making persistent connections outbound through the firewall to servers. There are protocols that can allow you to "punch ...


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Yes, this is possible. This can be automated easily with UPnP port forwarding, if enabled on the NAT host/device, if security is not a consideration. If you do not want to use UPnP, for example, because security is a consideration, you can achieve this using another API to access your NAT devices. UPnP is very common in home routers. You may wish to use ...


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please look. seems looks like your issue. http://www.slashroot.in/linux-kernel-rpfilter-settings-reverse-path-filtering


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NAT redirection doesn't work on traffic both from and to localhost. Try from another system on the LAN. Edit: Try looking at this question, which deals with getting unprivileged daemons to listen on privileged ports. The first answer is of no help, but the next one down should be. As for whether telling you that it doesn't work is not helpful, you are ...


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Like the first answer said, use -j NETMAP: # iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -d 10.11.0.0/16 -j NETMAP --to 192.168.0.0/16 # iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -s 192.168.0.0/16 -j NETMAP --to 10.11.0.0/16 It's probably a good idea to add -d 10.10.0.0/16 in the POSTROUTING row as well.


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Install VirtualBox (or some other virtualization provider) Install pfSense within a VirtualBox machine Configure whatever network topology/routing you want to test Profit! :) Is still iptables the right tool for the job? Would it be possible to do what I want? With a linux system, iptables would be part of the solution, yes, but if you're asking ...


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If you place your publicly accessible resources in a DMZ that is publicly addressed, hair-pinning will likely not be required.


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I'm pretty sure you can't do that with iptables natively. You have ip ranges, multiport, but AFAIK you can not map an IP range to a port range. However this can be solved quite easily with a small bash script : for i in $(seq 1 100); do iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -i eth0 -p tcp -d 172.16.0.$i --dport 22 -j REDIRECT --to-port 2`printf "%03d" $i`; done ...


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You're using portforwarding in the PREROUTING chain, so you have to use Port blocking in the FORWARD chain on the host system or block the port in the INPUT chains of the guest system. But it's easier to delete the portfording rule to make the website inaccessible Look at this chart to understand how the IPTables Chain Order works: ...


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mefat's answer helped me a lot but rather than a one off copy of all the main table rules into the two ISP tables a better approach may be to use the rule prio to add the default rules after the main table. Set up /etc/iproute2/rt_tables as normal: ... 10 ISP1 20 ISP2 ... Note that ip rule show Shows rules 0->local, 32766->main and 32767->default. See ...


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iptables has a match that suits you: It's called NETMAP. iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -i eth0 --src 192.168.2.200/?? -j NETMAP --to 192.168.1.0/?? iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -i eth1 --src 192.168.1.200/?? -j NETMAP --to 192.168.2.0/?? As for your interface aliases, ditch them. Not only are interface aliases deprecated (if you use ip addr, you will ...



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