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8

There is probably an STP collision across the stack. Log into the stack and re-start the STP loop discovery process.


6

HERE's the manual, there appears to be a section on how to do just that.


6

You need to ensure you have a HDMI v1.3 or 1.4 compliant cable to achieve this, even then you'll never see more than 8.16Gbps due to overhead. I've never seen HDMI being used this way, most sysadmins just buy switches with 10Gig ethernet ports to deal with the...erm, 10Gig ethernet. I like the ideal of the HDMI but it sounds a bit fragile a solution (as is ...


5

The normal use of VLANs is to separate subnets (e.g. 192.168.0.0/24, 10.20.0.0/16, etc) without using separate switches for each subnet. The point of the PVID is to have the switch tag incoming untagged packets, say from a workstation or server. Normal NIC configurations do not tag packets for most devices. If you were to connect a device capable of ...


5

Configure your ESXi hosts so that storage traffic cannot traverse the 1Gb NIC. It's as simple as that.


4

There is one think in the "smart managed" product description that has me recoiling in horror and considering it "not suited for purpose" and that is the phrase "web console". Without a mention of a telnet/ssh-based admin interface, there is no sensible way of driving the switch from code and that's a want-have for an SMB (and a must-have for a large ...


4

I don't know about Netgear. HP Procurves are great. They have a free lifetime warranty with next business day replacement, free firmware upgrades, and free phone support. Our 5406zl's have been rock solid for over 3 years. I would not hesitate to buy or recommend HP Procurve.


4

This has been answered many times here, but I need practice so I'll have another go at it. VLANs themselves are pretty easy to understand. Basically, what you are doing is carving up a switch into one or more logical groupings of ports. As an example, let's take an 8-port switch and assign ports 1-4 to VLAN10, and ports 5-8 to VLAN20. Devices plugged ...


4

Well, do you want to manage or not? If you don't need the management features and your 'main IT guy' didn't have any ideas in mind that required the extra capabilities of managed switches, then get the NetGear consumer stuff. If you need support for 802.1x, VLANs, DHCP snooping, etc. then you might need to step up the game and get the Cisco one. One other ...


4

I am not familiar with the particular Netgear switch, but I know exactly how VLAN tags work. You need the ports between the switches to be tagged for both VLANs, and all other ports untagged. If I understood your setup correctly, the following is what you need: Port 7 should belong to, and tagged for both VLANs 4 and 5. Port 1 should simply belong to VLAN ...


4

What you're describing isn't a broadcast-- it's just requests to a web site. That router device doesn't support port-mirroring, so you're in a bit of a challenging situation. Ideally, you'd wedge a computer between the router and the ISP on the LAN side of the firewall and sniff the traffic to determine which machine is generating the excessive requests. ...


4

No. The switch between Ethernet ports is implemented in hardware and the hardware does not support any monitoring option.


3

RIP is Routing Information Protocol, and is a very basic (and early) protocol for announcing routes available on a given interface. It's a broadcast protocol. For RIP packets that do NOT contain a Netmask, like yours, it presumes the use of the old and very deprecated classful designation of Subnets. In your case, it is announcing a route for 89.75.40.0/24, ...


3

Those fiber ports don't need to be uplink ports. You can really use any port as an uplink. All the newer switches have auto sensing ports on them. Just connect it and the switch and the other switch will figure it out.


3

If your netgear is not a firewall, your default needs to point to the ISP address on your em1 interface. Your em1 can connect the ISP through the netgear switch as long as the ISP connection is bridged by that switch. If that netgear is actually a firewall, you need to remove the 174 address from your freebsd machine, move that address to the netgear, and ...


3

It doesn't look like you can on that model. But it's easy enough to accomplish what you want - I'd tackle it by setting the company DNS server (or, if you don't have one, heaven forbid... client hosts files) to resolve facebook.com to a loopback address. I typically don't use 127.0.0.1, because that can be confusing when troubleshooting, but something odd ...


3

There's no chance of running mysql. If there's a way to use it with SQLite, it might actually be feasible. You'll have to put DD-WRT on it, following the instructions on the forum thread for the WNDR3400, recorded here for posterity: Download dd-wrt.v24-18000_NEWD-2_K2.6_mini-WNDR3400.chk Use the Netgear factory software to "Update" to the above download. ...


3

It's pretty standard for scp to be quicker than NFS; there's a lot more overhead and things that need doing for a network filesystem than for a simple machine-to-machine transfer.


3

Basically you NAT and portforward twice. Once on router2 to get an ip/port on the router1 network and then again on router1 to get onto the internet. Then you connect to the IP that is exposed to the internet and it automatically gets translated and port forwarded to the internal ip. No need for any special routes when it is a single pc like this.


3

The router may not support wireless logins by default. Most routers require the feature be enabled via wired connection before accepting wireless access.


3

SFP and SFP+ are standardized and generally are interchangeable in most situations. If a device requires coded SFP modules such as Cisco then you need to use an OEM module, or disable coded SFP on your switch. In your situation however, Netgear generally does not require coded SFP so you can use any SFP, even a Cisco.


2

Have you got your DNS server set as the router? If you haven't, using the routers IP address will work just as well (it's often http://192.168.1.1 but dependant on the router) The way this works is that the router hijacks any requests to www.routerlogin.net and redirects them to the local router. If you haven't got your DNS server set to use the router, it ...


2

This is where the link is supposed to lead: http://www.altimatech.com/ncpmfg/index.asp?mfgacronym=netg Open-source Google-fu: visio site:netgear.com


2

Yes, but you may want to turn off the NAT and firewall portions.


2

NFS should give you about 50% of the underlying disk write performance. If your disk does 100MB/s, then you should be able to do 50MB/s NFS write. About the mount options : use tcp. udp can give pretty bad results if your network is heavily loaded, or any network device is flaky.


2

best course of action with the FVX538 is put it in the bin. that way you save yourself days and days of figuring out its designers were nocturnal rodents from the moon. and thats with firmware 3.0.6-29. i hate to think what previous firmwares were like.


2

Check to see if there is there a host based firewall on the PCs that is blocking ICMP. Drop a packet sniffer on the receiving machine and see if the ping is even getting to the target.


2

Do you see the mac address with the corresponding IP of the other machine on the current machines arp table? arp -a in Linux.


2

Netgear's higher end offerings are still more in the prosumer/SMB realm than the true high-end switch realm. If you have the coin to drop on ProCurve hardware, you won't regret it in the long run.


2

Unless it's explicitly blocked by a firewall rule, the router should pass the traffic -- an IP packet is an IP packet, whatever the contents. (Protocol 41 is IPv6 encapsulated within IPv4). The router itself doesn't need to know anything about IPv6. Now, if you're using NAT, that will be a problem -- most NAT implementations won't automatically forward ...



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