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41

This attack disproportionately affected universities because, for historical reasons, many universities use public IPv4 addresses for most or all of their network, and for academic reasons have little or no ingress (or egress!) filtering. Thus, many individual devices on a university network can be reached directly from anywhere on the Internet. In your ...


19

There are a few reasons, none of which may be especially compelling at your size, but they are important to larger organizations. Driver version control. Since your clients will automatically download the proper driver from the print server, you can be sure that your organization is standardized on a "good" version of whatever drivers you use. There were a ...


17

On a HP4050 the First Page Out is rated at 15 second minimum. This number does not count if the printer is in sleep mode before. Per the service manual 17 pages per minute (ppm) 100 MHz RISC microprocessor First page out = 15 sec. Like other told the RAM would help to buffer big document, but the actual warming up of the printer would ...


16

Setup printers and use the FILE port. When you print you will be prompted to save a file somewhere.


13

I used to have a HP LaserJet 5000 (64MB) with a 10Base-T network card for printing A3 CAD drawings. It took around 2 minutes for the printer to process a single drawing. I decided to add memory (196MB total). The effect was that the first drawing still took around 2 minutes to process, but I could send many drawings consecutively to the printer and after ...


11

You don't really need a print server in your situation, given the small number of printers you've described. You've justified it yourself. Nobody is forcing you to use one :) But in general, people use print servers to streamline client deployment, offer central management and to ease print driver maintenance. It's all about scale.


11

Generally speaking, print servers are an act of kindness to those who manage your desktops. Printers can be mapped through group policy and/or added script-o-matically. You could pay someone to lay hands on 50 computers any time there's a change, but why? Edit--What MDMarra said about driver versions. I've seen drivers crash Word, for example. You can ...


11

RAM can help improve the ability to handle complex documents (we don't know what you're printing), but not overall processing time... However, the 4050N was discontinued 15 years ago in 2001. Just because you can make this printer be in service this long doesn't mean you should. There aren't too many good reasons against moving to a more modern variant ...


11

To extend on Michael Hampton's answer. Yes it's likely a port forward rule. But usually that's not something someone would expose deliberately. However it can be added by UPnP devices. Most likely by having UPnP enabled on your residential grade router. Universities probably have their printers hacked for other reasons as corporate grade routers ...


10

Put the printer on a third VLAN and ensure that both user VLANs have access to it via the router.


8

OK I managed to get this working. For Vista there is a Group Policy setting (more info here): User Configuration/Policies/Admin Templates/Control Panel/Printers Configuring the "Point and Print Restrictions" policy setting to "Disabled" will allow for silent printer driver installation, and thus allow the printer to be mapped successfully. After ...


8

There's plenty of things that can simulate printers. You can always make a printer attached to LPT1 on a server and share it out. You could install software like Adobe Acrobat or other PDF "printer" software, assuming you can find one that allows itself to be shared.


8

Powershell management of Group Policy sucks w/o third-party (commercial) products, in my opinion. I think you're stuck slinging through the XML (or in HTML if you prefer) in Group Policy Objects to do what you're looking for. Fortunately the XML doesn't look that terrifying. The per-printer UID value (which I believe is what @KatherineVillyard is referring ...


8

I'm afraid there is no "Off"-switch for WSD specifically for Printer discovery in Windows Server As an alternative to disabling the "Function Discovery Provider Host" service, you could change the following outbound rules' Action to Deny, in the Windows Firewall with Advanced Security: This will specifically block WSD and WSDAPI discovery events If ...


8

Yes you can do this. I use Security Groups and Item-Level targeting that apply to the computers and not to users. Users are moving (or graduating) and the computers for the most part are stationary. What you want to do is in active directory you want to create an OU called something like Printer Groups Create a Security Group under Printer Groups for ...


7

This is not true at all...64 bit servers will hand our 32 bit drivers as long as you install them. From printer properties, go to sharing, and add the 32 bit drivers from there. I've ran into a small problem with 2008 R2 machines when loading some 32 bit drivers because it doesn't have the ntprint dlls. You can grab these from a 32 bit Windows 7 install and ...


7

a printer is a "logical" construct and does not have to correspond to a real physical device. You can add, share and publish printers to the directory without having real physical printers. Select LPT1 or File as the port when creating them.


7

I googled pretty hard, and even toyed with backup-GPO in hopes of being able to hack the resultant XML file and reimport it, but I suspect that a PowerShell script is in your future. It's not that bad. You can generate the printer list from the nearest server and then loop through that and map them. Something like this: $net = New-Object -COMObject ...


6

Well this is fairly odd-I thought that information was exposed via SNMP. However a quick snmpwalk of one of our P4515s revealed only the number of pages printed with the currently installed fuser. To look at all the info exposed via snmp I did the following: snmpwalk -Cc -v 1 -c public ipaddress If the OID for the printed pages on the currently installed ...


6

Not in my experience no.


6

Create print queues on a central server, then use configuration management tools to deploy them to all of your clients. For Windows, you'll use Group Policy Preferences, most likely. For OS X, you can use WGM if you run Open Directory, or you can push it out with any number of tools like JAMF Casper, ARD, radmind, or even Puppet. It all depends on whatever ...


6

Another advantage of sharing the printer(s) on the print server is printer discovery. If you publish the printer in AD it makes it fairly easy for a user to discover and add the printer. Also, this is my opinion but it's based on my experience in larger corporate environments: I think you'll find that sharing printers from a print server (or print servers) ...


6

All of the above are good suggestions, but If it were me, I would ask windows to create a new local port and set it to something like d:\temp\print.out and make sure there's a scheduled task to clean it out periodically. Setting a printer to print to the file port results in a dialogue box asking where the print should be saved, which doesn't happen when you ...


5

Have you tried converting the gif to a postscript file? If you have imagemagick you can use: convert 1ZY437560399620027.gif 1ZY437560399620027.ps and print that? You can also use print to file in gimp or others. I'm assuming the issue is that lpr is going through a helper application that is creating the margins you have a problem with.


5

Do you have an AD domain? If so you can add a Domain Printer through group policy, and set it up on each machine with a logon script (also configured through group policy). This tutorial (Specifically: Part 2 of it) should get you started. Windows Help should fill in the blanks from there.


5

Others may correct me, but I've been told good practice is to have a print server (Windows server) set up with the printer then that computer, in turn, shares it out to Active Directory. That way it also acts as a repo for the Windows drivers for the clients to download when connecting. You just add the network printer as a "local printer" using a network/...


5

So I'm gonna break the bad news for you. It sounds like there is no support for that printer on 2008R2. I had a similar issue in the past with 32 bit print drivers for XP on a 2008R2 print server, and the solution in the long run was to upgrade all the clients to Win7. The fact that there's no Win7 driver for the printer makes me believe that there is no ...


5

You've answered this yourself with your CUPS server accepting everything as PostScript. Each printer has different features, capabilities and support which is why different printers require different drivers. Remember, Postscript and PCL aren't mandatory. It's easily circumvented when discussing text and a simple B&W laser printer, but take it to the ...


5

The Add Printer dialog you are using only shows printers that have been shared by computers on the network. The Dell printer is shared from a computer with a hostname of 'SHIPSTATION'. First of all, I'd give the new Xerox printer a static IP (or static DHCP lease), and maybe create a DNS entry for the printer to save you having to remember the IP address, ...


5

This is a well known phenomenon with migrating to a 64 bit OS. There have been a lot of institutions which have been forced to upgrade to new printers and scanners, etc. There is one kind of third party solution available that may be of interest. ThinPrint and a couple other vendors have paid products available that can be used as an intermediary driver ...



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