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6

In BSD, network interfaces are named after which driver they use. So in your case, emX = Intel, and bgeX = Broadcom. Any of your interfaces can be used for any purpose within pfSense. It's just up to you to examine the performance characteristics of each and decide accordingly.


2

It depends on the server generation. The downplane connections of G6 and newer blades have the capability of 2 x 10GbE LOMs per server. While your backplane connections sound like they're 1GbE, the blades should be able to communicate at 10GbE between other blades housed within the same chassis.


2

You need the read the manual for your modem You can often connect to a modem that is in bridge mode following the user manual's instructions to verify it's settings. Try connecting it to a PC/laptop and if you get the address 192.168.1.100 try connecting to http://192.168.1.1 (my last modem was like that). There might be an admin interface there. Once you ...


2

127.0.0.1 is your localhost loopback interface, meaning you're reaching your own server. For various reasons, your server is using that first to lookup DNS and since your server doesn't know how to answer a DNS query, you have to wait until the query times out and moves on to the 2nd nameserver. Just use the real DNS nameserver as the only entry: ...


1

You're probably looking for passive checks. To quote from the linked page: Passive checks are useful for monitoring services that are: Asynchronous in nature and cannot be monitored effectively by polling their status on a regularly scheduled basis Located behind a firewall and cannot be checked actively from the monitoring host Passive ...


1

If your VLAN and routing settings are correct, that shouldn't be a problem. We use pfSense as DHCP/ gateway for all our physical and VM servers (the pfSens is a VM).


1

More than likely you're pointed to 127.0.0.1 (localhost) because your distro uses a caching name service daemon. Think of it like a caching DNS server that runs on your own computer. The use of such a daemon is of debatable effectiveness. It does have some benefits in speeding up some types of Internet usage by cutting down on the number of DNS requests ...


1

You didn't provide an OS for the server machine, so I'm going to make several assumptions here. You can use iptables for this on Linux servers (i.e. configure the server to act as a router). First, you need to enable IP routing on the server machine: sysctl -w net.ipv4.conf.all.forwarding=1 Let's assume the vlans are both connected to the server on eth1 ...


1

You could use OSC Ng software - this is a great tool for maintaing a database of equipment. It's opensource, and is operating through software agents installed on end-user machines and servers. Basically, the agent approach is general when considering such software.


1

Windows TCP implementation is fairly opaque and you will frequently find that not all registry options are supported in all versions of Windows or are overwritten by some other setting. For reference, when Acknowledgement packets are sent for more than 2 full sized data packets, this is referred to as a Stretch ACK which you can read about here: RFC 2525.


1

It's a NAT rule. iptables -L -t nat Chain PREROUTING (policy ACCEPT) target prot opt source destination REDIRECT tcp -- anywhere anywhere tcp dpt:http redir ports 8080 REDIRECT tcp -- anywhere anywhere tcp dpt:http redir ports 8080 REDIRECT tcp -- anywhere ...



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