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13

sync and async have different meanings for the two different situations. sync in the client context makes all writes to the file be committed to the server. async causes all writes to the file to not be transmitted to the server immediately, usually only when the file is closed. So another host opening the same file is not going to see the changes made by ...


7

Check this open source project: Nekodrive http://code.google.com/p/nekodrive/ The target of this project is to implement NFS (Network File System v2/v3/v4.1) over the Dokan user file system for windows. This let you mount very easily an NFS export as a local windows drive. You don't need any NFS windows client to access the NFS remote export, you can ...


6

You can simply shut down Postgres, move the folder over and change the init scripts to point to the correct location for the data directory. Double-check the configuration files under data/ for references to the old path before restarting the server. You probably don't want to do this. Really. It's a BAD idea. NFS's other name is the Network Failure ...


6

You can specify multiple IP ranges on a line, separated by spaces: /share 192.168.89.1/24(rw,no_root_squash,async) 192.168.92.0/24(rw,no_root_squash,async) See the exports man page for some more examples (Scroll down to "Examples").


5

There are two common ways of dealing with a mixture of local and centralized accounts (be it LDAP or NIS or whatever). Your third update covers one of them. Local accounts use a non-/home base directory for homes LDAP/central use a non-/home base directory for homes I commonly use option #1 and create /local then setup my local accounts to have home ...


4

First, NFS does not provide cache coherency, so if you need that, you must look elsewhere. What NFS specifies is a weaker model called close-to-open consistency. Meaning that when a file is closed, any dirty data are flushed to the server. Conversely, when a file is opened, an attribute check is performed, meaning that if the client has cached pages from ...


4

As long as i understand the question, you can try Microsoft Windows Services for UNIX


4

You probably see the effect of symlink security hardening introduced since UbuntuĀ 10.10. This feature can be turned off through /proc/sys/kernel/yama/protected_sticky_symlinks. On Debian, this feature can be turned off by adding the following to /etc/sysctl.conf: fs.protected_symlinks = 0 Yet another variation on this theme is ...


4

There are settings in sysctl that defines NFS port ranges available for connections. sunrpc.max_resvport = 1023 sunrpc.min_resvport = 650 These settings define the highest and lowest ports to use for making RPC connections (NFS) You can open these ports or define a different range depending on your system. You will get denies if it tries to use a port ...


4

Yes it appears on the server - that's where the physical resource is.


3

NFS stores a lot of the client's state on the server. Pacemaker/OpenAIS can't make up for NFS's shortcomings in this area. The grace period is there for the server and clients to recapture state. It's part of the protocol. Anyway, it seems that you are not moving client state over completely (like /var/lib/nfs contents). See this for ideas and what needs to ...


3

lookup(program) means automount thinks your map is an executable, does it have the executable bit set? lookup(file) is what you should be seeing See http://www.squarebox.co.uk/cgi-squarebox/manServer/automount.8.


3

in its simplest form, NFS just presents a filesystem API accross the network. When your application starts reading data from the file, you'll send read commands to the server, and it will respond with the data. When the app stops reading, there won't be any more responses. Of course, there's a lot more under the hood, especially a 'readahead buffer' that ...


3

If your mounted points are permanent- placed in /etc/fstab - you can run mount -a to re-read fstab, which is same as a refresh. You could also use remount in case of a temporary mount


3

Using a "mapped" drive letter (or a UNC path) is going to send your I/O requests through a much longer software pipeline than addressing the physical drive through its "local" drive letter. There's a Stack Overflow question with some benchmarks in it to give you an idea of what the impact looks like.


2

iostat -mnh really is the best way to do this. It only combines stats for the same remote device. If your nfs mounts are from separate remote endpoints, then it wont combine them.


2

id appuser will likely show you that the shell still sees the old UID for the user. Logout and log back in.


2

OK! I have got it. Found it on Bing after trying many times. Still not certain exactly WHICH thing fixed by problem, of two possibilities. But here they are. There is "tell" on the internet that there can be client ownership permission problems with NFS v4. I don't know if that's true, and I don't care. Somebody had something they called a solution. So I ...


2

ON SERVER Try changing your /etc/exports to /export 192.168.1.0/24(rw,fsid=0,insecure,no_subtree_check,async) /export/users 192.168.1.0/24(rw,nohide,insecure,no_subtree_check,async) Then run exportfs -av ON CLIENT sudo mount -t nfs 192.168.1.11:/export /mnt or -t nfs4 Would be nice if you could post some output from /var/log/messages if ...


2

You have misspelled nfsvers=3 and no_root_squash.


2

The overlay fs provides a possibility to mount one filesystem on top of other one. You can use your nfs mount as lower fs and some local directory as upper fs. The local change will not be sent to the NFS server. More info: https://git.kernel.org/cgit/linux/kernel/git/mszeredi/vfs.git/tree/Documentation/filesystems/overlayfs.txt?h=overlayfs.current


2

Now we've got it working (-fstype=nfs is not needed, and probably not valid, in a map) your question betrays a misunderstanding about how automount presents to the user. Here's an automount entry in my master file /mnt /etc/auto.master.d/mnt and the corresponding map # cat /etc/auto.master.d/mnt helvellyn -ro,soft,intr ...


2

This is because sometimes NFSv4 does a problem with Ubuntu. I suggest you to use NFSv3 in a shared environment like that Please edit the /etc/default/nfs-kernel-server Edit the line as RPCNFSDARGS="--no-nfs-version 4" Add the following line MOUNTD_NFS_V3="yes" Then restart it restart nfs-kernel-server Test it, you will see no problem.


2

It could be that it's trying to mount the device before it's brought eth0 up (and therefore has no network connection). You can fix this by simply appending _netdev to the options portion of the fstab (i.e; defaults,_netdev). _netdev is a special flag which instructs the kernel that this is a network based device, so will not mount without a network ...


2

If you set up Quotas in the shared file system (on the server side), the clients can't use more space than the quota set.


2

If you want to limit the amount of disk space each user (or group) is using, then you can set up disk quotas on the NFS server (as mentioned in another answer already). You can easily find tutorials about how to do that. Once disk quotas are enabled, you can set the maximum disk space each user is able to use (the default is not to have any limit, so you ...


2

Based on comments so far: your mount works with NFSv3, it doesn't with NFSv3. you're using local accounts. This means that the problem is most likely down to NFSv4 account handling and idmapd. What happens in NFSv3 is that your client tells the server what UID and GID you're using. What happens in NFSv4 is that they use usernames and use idmapd to map ...


1

As for the "hanging" of the Monit process during NFS server faults, this can be circumvented by two methods. You change the NFS mount options from hard to soft, which causes the NFS layer to issue an I/O error to the accessing application after retrans retries. As this can introduce other problems with respect to data integrity (your writing applications ...


1

Did you check the init scripts for nfs already? I'd suspect that they are creating a pid file and sticking it somewhere for future restart or stop operations. If not, it should be pretty simple to modify them to do so. As far as checking the mount goes, take a look at section 4.3.1 at http://nfs.sourceforge.net/nfs-howto/ar01s04.html#mounting_remote_dirs ...


1

My Linux Mint Debian box seems to be have experience something very similar to the symlink security hardening that Sergey described in his answer. If you're running Debian, add the following to your /etc/sysctl.conf: fs.protected_symlinks = 0



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