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6

RAID is definitely not your answer. RAID is generally for drives being used in an array in the same physical location. If you want to sync file systems across continents, then you need to use a NAS product that has some form of live mirroring capability. Most enterprise-class SAN/NAS products have this feature. Otherwise, something like lsyncd or even a ...


3

no_root_squash is a server side (export) option, not a client side option. It therefore doesn't go in /etc/fstab, nor can it be specified to mount. If you think about it - why would you want a client to be able to decide "hey, I'll be root today, that'll be nice"? http://linux.die.net/man/5/exports I'd suggest though, that rather than setting ...


2

It's an interesting question. It's hard to answer because it's quite variable and depends on: what your NFS server is doing. (A NAS appliance is usually going to be quite clever about caching). Why your speed was 'so slow'. In general though - it's entirely normal for a server to cache write operations. RAID write penalty is quite high*, and you can ...


2

Based on comments so far: your mount works with NFSv3, it doesn't with NFSv3. you're using local accounts. This means that the problem is most likely down to NFSv4 account handling and idmapd. What happens in NFSv3 is that your client tells the server what UID and GID you're using. What happens in NFSv4 is that they use usernames and use idmapd to map ...


2

I think this should work. Make the files to be protected are owned by root:root. eg chown root:root Make sure root_squash is enabled on the nfs mount. chmod 0644 the files. If you can get away with it, chown root:root the directory, and chmod 755 the directory. That's the only way to ensure it cannot be deleted by anyone other than root. The owner--and ...


1

Default NFS service do not support proxy so i suggest you to use ganesha which i belive solve your problem https://github.com/nfs-ganesha/nfs-ganesha/wiki/PROXY


1

In /etc/exports use the ro option to only export the share as read only. /path/to/nfs webserver.com(ro) If you have selective files that you want to protect as read only, I would suggest not going down the rabbit hole of ACLs and permissions modifications, and simply make a static assets mounts and export that as (ro).


1

If data is available in the file system cache, then 'read' syscall will get the data, but there will be no read requests sent to the NFS server. This can happen when an application reads the same blocks several times, or when user opens the same file multiple times. You can flush the file system cache and watch the result of iostat again: # echo 3 > ...


1

A rpc message (and NFS is rpc based service) can be split into multiple frames (chunks). Any RPC server has a limit on frame size as well as a limit on message size. "RPC: fragment too large: " indicates that NFS server got a rpc frame which is bigger than max allowed size. This message can point to a bug in the client code, server code or network issues. ...


1

DRBD is more or less a RAID1 implementation for block device replication over networks and does sync in real-time. For high latency/low bandwidth communication using a indirect setup using DRBD proxy is recommend. When using DRBD over high latency, possible instable WAN connection, a active/passive (called primary/secondary in DRBD) setup is highly ...



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