Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Modifying Samba and/or NFS is not the proper solution here. Instead further restrict ssh access in /etc/ssh/sshd_config to those users which should have access by using AllowGroups/AllowUsers. You may also be interesting in using Match blocks, depending on your situation.


0

Server2 is successfully accessing the share using NFSv3. Server3 is failing to access the share using NFSv4. Why don't you try using the same nfs options on server3 (nfsvers=3,rw) and see if anything changes?


0

You will want to configure veto files in the settings. https://www.samba.org/samba/docs/man/manpages-3/smb.conf.5.html#VETOFILES On top of that you should make sure that the settings for these directories are 600 or lower. So no other users can execute. But if its only the one user that is accessing their own home directory the risk should be minimal. It ...


2

Maybe a good hint is to find how many opened NFS files a user have (from the client side). I would use lsof -N. This one liner might help you: for user in $(who|awk '{print $1}'|sort -n|uniq); do echo $user ; lsof -N -u $user -a |wc -l; done


1

There is a great tool wireshark . With it's terminal version, tshark, you can find client and uid: $ tshark -i any -Y 'rpc.msgtyp == 0' -f 'port 2049' -Tfields -e frame.time -e ip.src -e nfs.main_opcode -e rpc.auth.uid You will get output like: Jun 23, 2015 11:41:13.306857000 aaa.bbb.ccc.ddd 9 0 with timestamp, client ip, nfs operation and uid. ...


2

Assuming that there is indeed a culprit (a single user) responsible for the majority of the 2.5k IOPS: I'd start with top - at that rate you should see one or a few users and processes standing out in the active processes on the box, mostly sleeping but quite often in ready state as well - I'd press i (to hide inactive processes) then press and hold the ...


0

The command "net use"... is for mounting Windows shares (SMB/CIFS). The command "mount"... might be usable to mount NFS disks, but that command does not take any user or password options. When you mount a Windows share you provide a user with password and that user will be responsible for all accesses on the server. When you mount an NFS disk all users on ...


1

Use one or the other. I suggest using /etc/exports for consistency and readability, especially if your NFS server is serving data from non-ZFS filesystems.


1

It's seems like You have to add auto option. As example 10.0.0.61:/vault/data /usr/data nfs _netdev,defaults,user,auto,noatime,intr 0 0


1

This is probably because you did not restart the NFS server when mounting a filesystem. The NFS server will take a handle to the filesystem on which the exported directory exists; if you change that by adding a mountpoint, the NFS server will not notice and needs a kick in the butt. This is required for the protocol, BTW, because for some operations, NFS ...


0

There are also my tips here: NFS Over OpenVPN: Top Performance Boosters and the full version is here: http://thegoodcodeinn.blogspot.it/2015/06/nfs-over-openvpn-over-adslor-slow.html


0

I have played with NFS configuration with openvpn on ADSL connection, I have tried different NFS mount options, here you can find the complete post: NFS over OpenVPN over ADSL(or slow connection) I quote here the interesting parts: I have read lot of posts and I have tried the reasonable subset of suggested solutions, this is the summary of the best tips: ...



Top 50 recent answers are included