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If you are mounting a network drive that will be slow. Use rsync -aud from windows to linux it will take less than 1 minute after the first run for many TB (assuming neg monthy changes). If you want versioning use rdiff-backup after the rsync. Other options; http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_backup_software


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My guess would be that the problem is caused by the use of fsid=0 in one of your exports. Remember that the fsid is meant to uniquely identify devices when the underlying filesystem driver doesn't provide its own unique IDs. And in particular, fsid=0 has a special meaning: For NFSv4, there is a distinguished filesystem which is the root of all exported ...


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I am presented with SMB, NFS and iSCSI options to connect to the server. Meaning, I have the option of either setting up a share via NFS or SMB or creating a virtual iSCSI drive in which I can connect to. For direct connection to a server—for true server related storage—iSCSI is the way to go. And you would then manage the user access—via SMB/CIFS ...


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When you say you are presented with those option to connect to the server, what are you referring to? For HyperV, you most likely would use a locally hosted VHD(x) file on local exposed drive in the Hosts's OS. There are reasons to do some of the other methods like iSCSI, but typically they are for use cases where you need clustering or failover or have ...


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It's largely academic, because your limiting factor will most likely be your network bandwidth. The only thing to watch for really, is sizes of files vs numbers of operations - lots of small files will result in lots of small copy operations. But as it stands - it's hard to say for sure what will be 'fastest' because 'it depends'. I would be surprised to ...


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After some more trial and error, I found that running exportfs -f on the server actually worked. I was able to mount after that.


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Do you really want to use Solaris? Ubuntu can run ZFS. Other Linux variants can support ZFS. There are other Solaris-derived operating systems that can do it (OmniOS, OpenIndiana, etc.). Oh, and FreeBSD... Not to mention the appliance solutions: Zetavault, QuantaStor, napp-it, Nexenta, Cloudbyte... Anyway, I would use ZFS mirrors. Multiple vdevs and gives ...


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In RHEL 7, the same SELinux policies that apply to Apache also apply to nginx. So you can use the same booleans: httpd_use_nfs (off , off) Allow httpd to use nfs Set the correct boolean to allow the web server to use NFS. setsebool -P httpd_use_nfs 1


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I noticed that in order to mount/umount work properly, I need to run a simple cd command. Any ideas about that? If you are currently in a directory that is within a mounted filesystem and you try to unmount it, you normally get an error message that the fielsystem is busy the effect of this is it can't be unmounted e.g. $ umount: /mnt/data: device is ...


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You can't specify which files are cached by the cachefilesd, it simply caches the files used by the system. You can tune how the cache works by setting parameters in cachefilesd.conf but basically all you get to do is turn it on using the fsc option to mount and the system does the rest. Red Hat have a good write up on it.


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This is normal behavior of XenServer. All the metadata for the image (VDI) is in the Xapi database files, not in the image files themselves. Note that the UUIDs of images are also gone, so no matter if you've imported diskless VMs back from old hosts or recreated them from scratch, there's no way to Xapi to find which VDI belongs to which VM. Same goes for ...


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You can use mountstat command to watch you nfs client statistics including latency. Or use nfsiostat. In general, configure your file manager to avoit file preview generation for non local filesystems.


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You can run strace on a fresh process and filter for long-running calls, as described @ https://stackoverflow.com/questions/4795831/how-to-use-strace-to-only-show-calls-that-take-a-lot-of-time


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This slow behavior is caused by the "sync" directive on you NFS export. You can change it to "async" for better performance, but you need to understand what it means in regard to data safety. I suggest you to read the exports (5) man page: http://linux.die.net/man/5/exports


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Nfs 4.1,never tried but i heard is possible a active/active cluster. Nfs classic active/active is impossible as i know,is possible a active/passive cluster,drbd and nfs and pacemaker or better hearbeat. Here's a nice how to,fast and simple https://www.howtoforge.com/high_availability_nfs_drbd_heartbeat


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It looks like this was a bug that was fixed in a recent update. Everything works correctly now.


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I think this will work, given your comments above: sandbox1$ cat ~/.ssh/id_dsa.pub >> ~/.ssh/authorized_keys Then ensure the NFS mount is active from 1 to 2. You should then be able to login from 1 to 2 and vice-versa without passwords. You may have to use id_rsa.pub or authorized_keys2 depending on your specific setup.


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Clients (especially MS) look up DNS for LDAP. DNS must have a srv for LDAP. dig [@ns] _ldap._tcp.example.com srv might reveal if it has one. If the NAS still can't find it, adding an MS-specific one might help, like _ldap._tcp.dc._msdcs.example.com. <ttl> IN SRV <prio> <weight> 389 freeipa.example.com. and freeipa.example.com. ...



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