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1

I strongly suspect that oflag=dsync is the reason causing this - dd executed on host, obeys this flag, sshfs instead doesn't pass this to the server, therefore its making use of caching methods. Usually NFS should be one of the fastest options to access remote storage. Compared to SSHFS your data doesn't have to went trough encryption and the FUSE stack.


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The client support exists since linux kernel 2.6.39, but part of it was backported to RHEL6 servers as well. IOW, any modern client will support pnfs as soon as server will advertise it. The main requirement to use NFSv4.1/pNFS is capable server. Known server: Linux 4.0, block layout NetApp 8.1, file layout dCache, file layout Ganesha NFS, file layout (and ...


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1) SANs are all about blocks so these are iSCSI, Fibre Channel, and FCoE. But you can hardly find "true" or "pure" SANs these days maybe only Nimble and Equallogic who can't do also NAS protocols like NFS and SMB in addition to block ones. These are called "multiprotocol" storage appliances. http://www.netapp.com/us/media/tr-3490.pdf (Multiprotocol NetApp ...


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I've just had the same problem in 2016, using CentOS 6.5 on my workstation, and CentOS 7 on the client (a Vagrant box on the same host). My specific problem was the same as the OP's, I couldn't find any nfsd logging. Use rpcdebug to Enable NFS Logging The answer for me, for anyone else coming to this question in the future, was to use the command (as ...


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I've just had the same problem in 2016, using CentOS 6.5 on my workstation, and CentOS 7 on the client (a Vagrant box on the same host). My specific problem was the same as the OP's, I couldn't find any nfsd logging. Use rpcdebug to Enable NFS Logging The answer for me, for anyone else coming to this question in the future, was to use the command (as ...


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EDIT: this actually didn't work (yet). The mounted share now shows with the correct UID/GID, but that user cannot access the files or directories. I'm getting an input/output error. This isn't ideal, but technically works. I reconfigured NFS Sharing on the shared folder in Server2012 to allow anon access with specified UID/GID. The share is only ...


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Maybe some polling could help. This is independent of systemd. For example I use mysql -e ';' in a loop before doing something useful with mysql.


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To answer the question wrt *nix servers with Windows 8.1/10 x64 clients, - one can mount an NFS client on Win8.1 and use nfs server on *nix - one can use SMB server on linux (samba is easily available). There are a few closed source smb3 stacks like MoSMB. SMB2/3 protocol is best for suited to Windows clients wrt features supported and performance. - ...


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http://veerapen.blogspot.com/2011/09/tuning-redhat-enterprise-linux-rhel-54.html In short: Configuring the Linux scheduler on systems with hardware RAID and changing the default from [cfq] to [noop] gives I/O improvements. Use the nfsstat command, to calculate percentage of reads/writes. Set the RAID controller cache ratio to match. For heavy workloads ...


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CIFS support is not that great on some UNIX. AIX crashes like this come to mind but it also isn't great at POSIX for *nix clients like some apps expect. Some NAS appliances can export the same shares as NFS and CIFS. Your assumption that you must pick one is not necessarily true.


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Check telneting to the port on the Azure server, if that fails you might have to modify the Azure servers security group and add a rule that allows ingress to Port 111 (TCP and UDP) and 2049 (TCP and UDP) for the NFS server, and egress rules for the client. if they are on the same subnet then something else is wrong. ...


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Ugh finally got it working, had to do the following to hack the all_squash feature. I did it awhile ago and don't remember why it had to be done, but without it I couldn't get the perms to squash properly. $ -> ls /mnt/raid/nas drwxrwxr-x. 2 nas filer repo drwxrwxr-x. 3 nas filer repo_all_squash_hack $ -> ls /mnt/raid/nas/file drwxrwxr-x. 2 ...


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The AFS cache coherency model adopted by OpenAFS and AuriStorFS is a bit different than you describe in the question. Each object stored under /afs has both Data: the file stream, directory contents, mount point target, or symlink target. Metadata: size, creator, owner, group, unix mode, link count, timestamps, parent id, lock state, access control list, ...



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