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24

Yes, it can be done in Windows: Go to the Control Panel > Network Connections Right click on the Local Area Connection (or whichever network connection you want to add the 2nd IP Address) and click Properties Click on Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) in the connection box and click properties Enter the first IP address in the properties box Click Advanced Click ...


18

(2a). Load balancing. (3). Separation of traffic (i.e. you could have a combo web/database server, same network, put all web traffic on one NIC, db traffic on the other, makes it easier to calculate loads for traffic types). This also makes it easier to split the two later on, nobody has to change connection strings.


18

You don't mention a particular OS but for most all that happens is that the data travels down the stack until it gets to IP at which point it's pretty much sent back. That's a massive oversimplification but means that the entire process is usually CPU bound so its performance is therefore directly linked to CPU speed plus stack efficiency. In practical terms ...


12

You're not going to want to do this with direct manipulation of the registry. You're much better off using the netsh command to make these kinds of changes. Assuming the NIC is named "Local Area Connection", you can do netsh interface ip "Local Area Connection" x.x.x.x y.y.y.y where x.x.x.x is the IP address and y.y.y.y is the subnet mask.


12

They probably mean your MAC address. (The hexidecimal string under the Physical Address column of getmac. - Either D4-BE-D9-1C-4F-C7, 24-77-03-3E-B2-9C, 7C-E9-D3-FE-40-41, or 24-77-03-3E-B2-9D, depending on which is your NIC/the Network interface this license will be run against. Most likely D4-BE-D9-1C-4F-C7.) Certainty will require asking whomever it is ...


11

Bonding is not applicable for this case. For your solution: You will find some useful notes at Increasing bandwidth with multiple NICs. For Bonding: You can start at the Wikipedia Link Aggregation and related Channel bonding pages for initial reading on bonding.


11

Wait - you're asking for server grade NICs but want to buy a 350 bucks switch?! I don't get that ... Usually "server grade" 48 port GigE switches go for somewhere around 3000-5000 USD list price. Maybe you want to look out for switch side things like stacking for cross-stack LACP. Regarding the NIC, things like: proper DMA interface and good drivers that ...


10

For that I am planning to use an old Pentium 3 machine. Since you are using an older machine, I suspect I would go with whatever is inexpensive. Does your computer have a 64 bit PCI-X slot? Most of the 4 port PCI interfaces I have seen prefer one? Since you are already choosing to use an older machine, I am not sure you will really see much ...


10

If your NICs have the same MAC addresses, you should stop fiddling around with workarounds and return them to the manufacturer as defective. Get proper replacements and continue on as normal. Incur the downtime once instead of the recurring issues that will pop up from continuing to hack together a "solution."


10

What should be: The PCIe spec states that all slots start at 1x and neotiate how many lanes they can use. It shouldn't matter who has more, some slots are designed to take larger cards and smaller cards fit in larger slots. Whatever the highest speed both sides can communicate at (both the number of lanes and the clock/version), that is the speed that will ...


10

A "default" gateway is just one that is used when there isn't a more specific route defined. You don't want to have a default route on two different interfaces (unless you're doing it for redundancy). What you want is to have a default route on your "main" interface that most of the traffic uses and then you want to create a persistent static route for each ...


9

Yes. Not an answer to your question, but something I didn't believe until I had seen it with my own eyes, it is sometimes possible to take a hacksaw to a PCIe x16 card and cut the connector down to fit into a PCIe x4 slot. "Why on earth would you want to do that?" is the obvious question. Well we inherited half a dozen Poweredge 440s that we wanted to use ...


9

"Bonding" (teaming, trunking, or a host of other terms) NICs is used to increase bandwidth into a switch, or for redundancy for LAN connections. Redundancy and/or bandwidth expansion for WAN connections (like, to the Internet) is accomplished with routing protocols (typically BGP). Bonding the NICs together on a server computer isn't going to accomplish ...


9

Sure, you simply have to enable vlan tagging on the switch and the network adapter and setup both sides with all the vlans you want the computer to see. The details about how to configure vlan trunking vary depending on what OS, and what you have to do for a specific nic or switch. Keep in mind that this may be a bit of a security issue. Suppose this is ...


9

The main principle behind interrupt moderation is to generate less than one interrupt per received frame (or one interrupt per transmit frame completion), reducing the OS overhead encountered when servicing interrupts. The BCM5709 controller supports a couple of methods in hardware for coalescing interrupts, including: Generate an interrupt after ...


8

There's always more than one way to do anything :) Solution 1 Motherboards with one of each? Blacklist whichever module (ethtool -i eth0) is supporting the Realtek card. Ubuntu supports module_name.blacklist=yes to blacklist it at boot and you should be able to change the modprobe options in the preseed environment so that it doesn't get probed later. ...


7

Duplex is a bit of a misnomer in Gigabit Ethernet as there are not separate send and receive channels like in 10Mb or 100Mb Ethernet. In the lower speeds 2 wires are used to send, and 2 to receive. The other 4 wires aren't used at all (for data anyway). In Gigabit Ethernet all 4 pairs are used to send and receive. It uses a 2 of 5 trellis coding: For ...


7

Having configured a number of SmartUPSes with AP9606 in my time, I do not remember ever having had the need for an "APC-proprietary" serial cable. The documented pinout looks like a simple null-modem cable swapping the TX and RX pins: +-----------------------------------------------------------------+ | ...


7

Speed is not that essential as many think. I had a server that had many drops (ingoing and outgoing) - but every tool only showed low bandwidth utilization (on a gigabit link, less than 2% average). Nevertheless the statistic counters showed dropped tx and rx on the server. An analysis of the ip-packets showed that the server is being flooded by thousands ...


7

Not to take this another route (pun)...but have you considered a single NIC in your machine pointing to a managed switch or firewall that is connected to both the DSL line and the T1? This way you eliminate the routing on the client workstation and let your networking equipment handle the default route(s) and failovers.


7

Yes, it works just fine, obviously it's only work at x4 speed (8Gbps). I would check whether the x16 slot can handle the power load of the x4 adapter, it depends on the adapter but I've seen some quite high power draw adapters using x4 electricals without an external power connector such as those you see in higher-end video cards. In some cases system-board ...


6

Yes it is backwards compatible: PCI-E x1 card will go in a x1, x4 or x16 slot. PCI-E x4 card will go in a x4 or x16 slot. PCI-E x16 card will only go in a x16 slot. In addition PCI-E 2.0 cards will work in PCI-E 1.0 slots with the above limitations. PCI-E 2.1 incorporates some components of PCI-E 3.0 but without changing compatibility or speed.


6

It's rather question of routing. Default route through WiFi, while route with your local LAN mask through Ethernet. Assuming, that WiFi card has IP 12.34.56.78 and Eth card 192.168.1.123 you'd have routing table something like: Network Address Netmask Gateway Address Interface Metric 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 12.34.56.1 ...


6

couple of things to check: run ethtool eth0 and see what speed/duplex status you have on the interface, then check if switch on the port you connect your server to has the same settins [ expected are: full duplex, 100 or 1000 MBit/s. identical on both sides ] if there is no duplex missmatch - check the switch port and the network interface - maybe one of ...


6

What's the maximum speed of an Ethernet cable (not a phone cable! the one that has 8 threads) Gigabit Ethernet (1000BASE-T) utilising a standard cat5 ethernet cable is cabable of 1,000 Mbit/s (mega bits per second) or 116 MB/s (mega bytes per second), although achieving this is practice can be troublesome, it's almost possible to achieve using two ...


6

No, you cannot handle multiple ISP uplinks using bonding. Bonding is strictly a Layer 2 (Ethernet) technique, and has no way to detect upstream failures or properly split traffic beyond the direct Ethernet link to your upstream switch/router. Linux can support multiple upstream ISPs, in either a load-balancing (with limits) or redundant configuration (or ...


6

You may be interested in the Loopback Fast Path feature we added in Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012. I've written a short blog about it here http://blogs.technet.com/b/wincat/archive/2012/12/05/fast-tcp-loopback-performance-and-low-latency-with-windows-server-2012-tcp-loopback-fast-path.aspx It also provides an illustration of the path taken by the ...


6

It's a single network chip (the Broadcom BCM5709); that chip has two ports which can be configured independently, redundantly, or teamed. It will work just fine for your application.


6

This is going to get closed, but it's a design decision like anything. For example, a 10Gb NIC is only useful if you have a 10Gb port to plug it into. 10 1Gb NICs may plug nicely into your core switch. Additionally, you'd need two (on separate switches) for redundancy. Taking your virtualisation route, it's very useful to have multiple NICs because it ...


5

Matt, When you team the two NICs together the utility will create a new "Teamed" NIC in Windows that you then apply your static IP address to, rather than applying it to both NICs. Once you have created the Team the IPs on the individual NIC are are not used and the Team's IP is used instead.



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