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2

In the first example, the jitter is very high, as is the offset. With jitter measured in seconds, NTP will probably just decide that both reference servers are insane and will refuse to sync. Your other problem is that the rule for NTP reference servers is "one or four". A man with two clocks is never sure which clock is wrong, a man with three clocks can ...


1

Yes you can do this with the ntp reference implementation. Use the -4 and -6 directives in your config: server -4 XXX.example.com server -6 XXX.example.com server pool.ntp.org # blah blah rest of config


2

The definitive statement is in your ntpq -c rv output, where it says stratum=3 You are sync'ed; ntpd is working. When your daemon reports a stratum that isn't 16, you know you are sync'ed. In this case, ntpq -c pe tells you that your system peer (the one whose clock your daemon is currently following) is time5.aliyun.com, aka ntp1.aliyun.com. Its ...


6

No. It is good practice to run ntpd, because that is what it is for - to continuously keep your time as precisely sync'ed to correct time as possible, with the assistance of one or more reference servers (or, with acknowledgement to Michael, some other NTP daemon). ntpdate's job is to brutally wrench the system clock into something close to correctness, ...


0

The answer was given by mboehn. To clarify more: See the document he mentioned. Especially the last lines: The pool scheme is configured using one or more pool commands with DNS names indicating the pool from which to draw. The pool command can be used more than once; duplicate servers are detected and discarded. In principle, it is possible to ...



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