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2

It is usually not the database server which is vulnerable to error when an instant time leap occurs: its the applications that use the time that are. There are generally two ways of tracking time: own time tracking or comparing system time. Both have some positive and negative tradeoffs. Own time tracking I see this used in some embedded programming and ...


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Databases don't like backward steps in time, so you don't want to start with the default behavior of jumping the time. Adding the -x option to the command line will slew the time if the offset is less than 600 seconds (10 minutes). At maximum slew rate it will take about a day and half to adjust the clock by a minute. This is a slow but safe way to adjust ...


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Databases can be especially vulnerable to system time changes if they are very active and have timestamps on internal records. In general, if you're time is behind, you'll have much fewer problems if you suddenly jump forward than if you're ahead and suddenly jump backwards. As Joffrey points out - it's much more often the application that has issues with ...


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Since it's trying to use IPv6 you probably want to allow it in your config file: restrict -6 ::1


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I think what you're getting at is, "what does it look like within the system when a leap second is happening", right? Pretty much the same as a time zone's daylight savings change, if your servers are unfortunate enough to be set up on a daylight savings clock. If an extra second (or hour) is being added, the timestamp will happen twice: at the end of the ...


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If you don't like this server 10.x.x.Z as reference this should do the trick: server 10.x.x.Z noselect This is useful if the server should only be used for monitoring reasons. alternatively you could also configure: server 10.x.x.X prefer Therefore 10.x.x.Z will not be used if 10.x.x.X is available .


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The domain controller is a always using the hardware clock. The W32time client is just making periodic corrections to it. (Note that "hardware" becomes a nebulous term when talking about a virtualized server.) If it cannot sync with an external time server, the local clock will keep ticking, but will lose accuracy over time. The local hardware clock will ...


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It is always using the hardware clock. The default for a DC is to check its time against the external time server. At that time it will make a correction, if necessary. If it can't reach any of the defined external time servers it will just keep on with its own clock. The clients will check with the DC to correct their time. So without an external ...



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