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You can find out about the pool at http://www.pool.ntp.org/. I queried the pool 100 times but only got 13 unique servers (out of the 255 available for FR). The DNS server for the NTP Pool brings hosts in and out of the available DNS over time. For example, my host gets brought into the available pool for a 15 minute slot every few hours. I did ...


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Since the DNS replies are cached by DNS resolvers, it is no surprise that you kept getting the same answers. It is also possible that the authoritative DNS servers will decide which subset of NTP servers is most suitable based on proximity to the DNS recursors, which means even after the cache has expired, you are likely to get the same IPs again after ...


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To clarify: All computers get their time from their RTC (real time clock), unless they're virtual machines, in which case the host hypervisor injects it's time into the VM at startup (because virtual machines don't have an RTC). Thereafter they sync their time either with the host hypervisor (if configured to do so), or in the case of a domain member, with ...


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An old thread I know, but for the benefit of anyone else landing here I found (in pfSense 2.2 anyway) that you still have to enter a timeserver but if you tick the "noselect" box against every timeserver you will completely disable NTP. Unfortunately that also prevents pfSense acting as an NTP server so you can't use it as the time server on you local ...


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Also consider that sometimes, virtualized systems that run Windows OS joined to a domain have the wrong setting to synchronize time with the host. This is not a best practice because the VM continue to change its time setting first synchronizing from the PDC Emulator as Daniel said on Windows side, then from the host on Hypervisor side. This could generate a ...


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This article explains it very well: β€œIt’s Simple!” – Time Configuration in Active Directory Summarized, clients get their time from the PDC emulator. And the PDC emulator gets its time from the BIOS clock, unless you configure an external time server, which is strongly advised. You can set the clock on the PDC with this command: w32tm /config ...


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If you have ntp running and configured correctly, there should be no need to run ntpdate at all. All I typically use it for is to manually set the clock during installation.


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From a fast check, it looks like it's impossible to change, But you can try and use iptables to redirect it through another port, try to see, if this link will be helpful It depends on what are your needs


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Can a linux server be configured to use a high source port(above 1023) for NTP synchronization I had a quick look at the man pages for ntpd(8), ntp.conf(5), ntpdate(8) on a CentOS 6 system I have to hand and non of these makes any mention of being able to change the port that they listen on or connect to. I would not expect other distros or OSes to be ...



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