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12

You can register a private enterprise and then an OID will be allocated for your use as you see fit. There is no fee. It will be under iso.org.dod.internet.private.enterprise (1.3.6.1.4.1). For example, my company can use: 1.3.6.1.4.1.17992 for any internal and published applications that we develop. As voretaq7 points out, you need to internally organize ...


6

You can have a look at this page. It shows you the top-level MIB tree. When referring to OID like: 1.3.6.1.4.1.8072, you are referring to : iso.org.dod.internet.private.enterprise.your_company So, this is the convention used. Otherwise, you may have conflict with existing MIBs. Note that your_company is not just some number you can make up yourself -- It ...


4

The real issue here is whether or not Brother has built support into the printer to report out actual toner levels via SNMP. Looking at vendor specific MIB's is a good way to get an idea of what kind of information is supported. Looking up Brother's MIB's - http://www.oidview.com/mibs/2435/BROTHER-MIB.html - we can see that they seem to only report out low ...


4

If all you are trying to do is prove to the client that they are overloading the AP, you can use the dot11RetryCount and dot11MultipleRetryCount OID's. dot11RetryCount - 1.2.840.10036.2.2.1.4 dot11MultipleRetryCount - 1.2.840.10036.2.2.1.5 This will give you a rough estimate of how congested the air is. Once the Retry count reaches more than about 10% ...


3

Radius, thanks for pointing me in the right direction. googled up a bit based on your sugestions and i think i have it now. To anyone else who might need it, this is the procedure .... 1. get the mac address detected on a vlan (1 in this example) snmpwalk -c public@1 -v2c 10.1.1.10 1.3.6.1.2.1.17.4.3.1.1 SNMPv2-SMI::mib-2.17.4.3.1.1.0.1.66.208.103.0 = ...


2

.1.3.6.1.2.1.25.1.5


2

The simple approach would be just monitoring the IF-MIB::ifInOctets.<ifIndex> / IF-MIB::ifOutOctets.<ifIndex> OIDs periodically and checking against the available bandwidth. From your linked MikroTik MIB you can discover the currently set rates by reading the mtxrWlStatTxRate: 1.3.6.1.4.1.14988.1.1.1.1.1.2.<ifIndex> and mtxrWlStatRxRate: ...


2

This is not guaranteed to work, but does with a few printers - if it does it saves a lot of trial and error. Install the full sw/driver package which installs a utility in the system tray that reports printer status. Install wireshark and start looking at whats going through your nic. We are only interested in looking at SMNP traffic to/from the IP ...


2

The design of the Extend MIB is that you would query the nsExtendConfigTable looking for the index that corresponds to the correct name, specified in the extend directive. Once you have that index, you can then query the tables nsExtendOutput1Table and nsExtendOutput2Table. So, to answer your question, the OIDs will change, but are programmatically ...


2

Did you install the OMCI on the Precision T36 from here: http://en.community.dell.com/techcenter/systems-management/w/wiki/1773.openmanage-client-instrumentation-omci.aspx You'll need that installed. The SNMP "system state group" will have power supply info for instance. You can find the full references here: ...


2

First hit on google for each: Cisco MIB's: http://www.cisco.com/public/sw-center/netmgmt/cmtk/mibs.shtml Juniper MIB's: http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/software/index_mibs.html ZTE MIB's: http://www.oidview.com/mibs/3902/md-3902-1.html Now go hang your head in shame :)


2

First, IANA assigns OIDs under 1.3.6.1.4.1 which are "Private Enterprises." Juniper has 1.3.6.1.4.1.2636 (see http://www.alvestrand.no/objectid/1.3.6.1.4.1.html). To get the rest it is better to trace backwards from the last element "jnxOperatingDescr." Here is the definition: jnxOperatingDescr OBJECT-TYPE SYNTAX DisplayString (SIZE (0..255)) ...


1

If your MIB is not available in your equipment, you can't ask him the informations. After that, check if the OID is availble (if you know it) : sometimes the constructor sites are wrong, and you have access to some OIDs but the MIB is not in the available list. Of course, the OIDs is not customizable : it is programmed in hard in the equipment. The MIB ...


1

If you have the snmpd installed on your Nagios server (running CentOS 6?) everything is already in place. Then you can start monitoring using the OID-names as well. Do a snmpbulkwalk -v 2c -c $COMMUNITY $TARGETSYS to dump a full snmp-listing of the target system.


1

What you want is called discovery in the network monitoring world. The high-level approach to this is to usually ping your entire IP network graph using ICMP or TCP pings and on a response, do an SNMP get of a standard RTF OID, like sysname. You SNMP get a standard RTF OID because those are usually implemented by default on most systems. ICMP Ping entire ...


1

If the standard Windows SNMP agent doesn't report real-time data, you'll have to create your own agent or find one that does.


1

Try the following: snmptrap.exe -v 2c -c xxxxxxx 192.168.100.65 '' .1.3.6.1.4.1.5089.1.0.1 .1.3.6.1.4.1.5089.2.0.999 s "123456" '' <- the first parameter for v2c trap is the agent uptime, it is mandatory and empty parameter will be replaced with current value .1.3.6.1.4.1.5089.1.0.1 <- trap OID .1.3.6.1.4.1.5089.2.0.999 <- varbind (this needs ...


1

You might try: http://www.wtcs.org/snmp4tpc/MIBS.htm#HP for a LJ4000 specific mib. Note that the mib author explains how a duplex count is made (around line 4389): "Total number of sheets of media that have been duplex printed. A sheet is counted if it travels through the duplex page path, regardless of whether or not marks are made on the ...


1

I'm not sure if it's supported on 2900/IOS 12.0 but you can try to broswe dot1dTpFdbPort (.1.3.6.1.2.1.17.4.3.1.2) You need to use a special community string including the vlan for which you want to get the mac address table: community@vlan_number So if your switch is 1.2.3.4, use community snmpro and have vlan 30, try this: snmpwalk -v2c -c snmpro@30 ...


1

There is no standardized MIB that reports this at the moment, unfortunately. I realize that's not an answer you want though :-(


1

The top of the Windows disk SNMP tree is .1.3.6.1.2.1.25.2.3.1, also known as ".iso.org.dod.internet.mgmt.mib-2.host.hrStorage.hrStorageTable" When I built an SNMP script to grab these kinds of metrics, it was pretty obvious which sub-OIDs belonged to cluster size, allocated space, free space, and volume name. The one gotcha to be aware of is that Windows ...



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