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The keepalive directive controls this: # The keepalive directive causes ping-like # messages to be sent back and forth over # the link so that each side knows when # the other side has gone down. # Ping every 10 seconds, assume that remote # peer is down if no ping received during # a 120 second time period. keepalive 10 120


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Assuming a full-tunnel configuration, your data is protected between your computer and the VPN service, and from a web site's perspective your traffic will appear to originate with the VPN provider. However, you are now placing a lot of trust in the VPN service. They do have un-encrypted access to all of your traffic. Additionally, anyone upstream to the ...


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Am I right : your IP is masked. Slightly masked. For something like a basic HTTP or FTP request, it will appear to come from the VPN server address, but with things like full email headers, Javascript and iFrames on websites, depending on the configuration it might be possible for some servers to see or work out your IP. The VPN company could leak ...


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The problem was not in Shorewall config at all. There actually WAS access from VPN to the Internet, but VPN clients had wrong DNS server address. There was a line in OpenVPN's server.conf push "dhcp-option DNS 192.168.0.1" Which didn't make sense in given setup. I corrected the address, and now VPN clients do have access to the Internet.


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A work-around would be a configuration management system like Puppet or Ansible, where you would specify the addresses in a single configuration file, and then would run the software which would then generate the actual files.


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I once did something like this for individually firewalling each user's connection. I have implemented it using the learn-address script in OpenVPN which is called when a user connects or disconnects. I have adapted it for your use case. The script looks as follows: #!/bin/bash statedir=/tmp/ function bwlimit-enable() { ip=$1 user=$2 # ...


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You need the --multihome option. Don't use --local because it is incompatible with a multihome situation. Also, you need to be 100% sure your routing table is good to go with a multihome setup. Linux users should check their distribution details, in particular: /sbin/ip rule list You should see at least 1 rule for each specific IP address your clients ...


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Notice the RST flag being on. It seems that your browser sends RST packet to an already closed connection to your proxy server. It is hard to tell why this happens from provided information. Probably if you managed to capture the connection which causes this via wireshark/tcpdump, you could find out. We start with what looks like normal data exchange, ...


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You didn't post your openvpn config, but I'm guessing you're missing the route to the rest of the LAN: push "route 192.168.182.0 255.255.255.240" This will add the necessary route on the client when they connect. Also, make sure that the other clients on your LAN know to use the OpenVPN server as their gateway for the OpenVPN network.



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