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Try using only one DNS server first. It may be that one of the DNS servers isn't accepting incoming requests. In my setup I simply have the dhcp-option DNS pointing to my tun0 'inet addr:'. Run ifconfig on the server to find out what that address is. Something like 10.8.xx.xx


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The duplicate-cn option does apply to the entire server, so in order to do this you will need to run two instances of OpenVPN (and they will have to run on different ports). If you're using EL7 or Fedora this is very easy to set up. Create /etc/openvpn/server1.conf and /etc/openvpn/server2.conf with your unique configurations, and then enable them both: ...


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Try change the rule: ACCEPT net $FW udp 1194 To be : ACCEPT:info net $FW udp 1194 Then tail the /var/log/syslog file to see if the connection is started. Make sure you /etc/shorewall/policy file has a section to allow VPN to LOC and LOC to VPN: loc vpn ACCEPT vpn ...


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I experienced a similar effect when I added the 'auth-nocache' option to my client configuration. I use certificates AND a username + password combination to authenticate. A few times I noticed in the connection logs that openvpn reported the following warning: WARNING: this configuration may cache passwords in memory -- use the auth-nocache option to ...


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Looking at the above I think your domain suffix search list should just be .local and not nnh.local. This is most probably the reason you had to create an entry for nnh.nnh.local, because the client would append nnh.local to the relative host nnh, giving nnh.nnh.local. You should be able to check this with the following command on the machine you want to ...


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Just to answer the question fully and formally. When working with FQDN/DNS on devices that can act as a DNS server, they need to have static records created. In cases where you setup Active Directory, DHCP, and DNS together using Microsoft's services all together, entries are normally created on their own. The best way to debug DNS issues are to check the ...


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This has nothing to do with SQL server or Hyper-V. What you're asking about is basic VPN knowledge, and it should be noted that people shouldn't be using VPN clients without knowing what they actually do. What you're experiencing is a VPN tunnel set to stricly forward all traffic across the tunnel. Get the VPN provider to set up a split tunneling so that ...


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Since your OpenVPN will reside on your router/firewall, no, it is not enough to allow access from VPN only to LAN-A. When a user connected to OpenVPN wants to access LAN-B, he will send packets to IP address in LAN-B. Packets on router/firewall machine will be destined to IP residing behind interface eth2 (assuming eth1 connects to LAN-A and eth2 to LAN-B). ...


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You can use IPv6 as the OpenVPN transport protocol (proto udp6) in OpenVPN configuration. Then, you can tunnel IPv4 via the OpenVPN tunnel. You need to set up NAT in your end, so that the traffic coming from your friend gets correctly routed via your IPv4 connection. So, the answer is yes.


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If the DNS is still being polluted then presumably the clients are using their original DNS server configuration. You can push new DNS server information to the clients from the OpenVPN server as part of the client setup push "dhcp-option DNS 8.8.8.8" There is more about push dhcp-options an in the documentation. You could even consider setting up your ...


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Not without any additional configuration: you need a NAT64 gateway. You could setup one yourself using a tool like Tayga or use a publicly available one (without needing to build the OpenVPN tunnel) like nat64.net.


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Maybe you can just create a DNS CNAME for every client, for example: clientname.mysql.myserver.com. CNAME mysql1.myserver.com. Instead of connecting to it's own VPN connect all clients to a single VPN and then they'd just connect to mysql server clientname.mysql.myserver.com. Moving a client database between servers would be as easy as changing this CNAME ...


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I am using this script vpn.py to list active connected openvpn users: #!/usr/bin/python lines = open("/etc/openvpn/openvpn-status.log", "r").readlines() for line in lines[3:]: items = line.strip().split(',') if len(items)>4: print "%-15s%-24s %s" % (items[0], items[1], items[4]) if line.startswith("ROUTING TABLE"): break


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If then, why what, how much have you got? I would utilize TAP, explicitly for the reason that the layering of the packets proceeds with much less latency and loss of transmission which is abated with this method. However only with layer 3 does this affect any apparent effect on the operation of the VPN, notably the tunneling aspect and which IPs are allowed ...


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Assuming you don't actually mean to "convert", but to "combine", "embed" or simply "use". You can use the [inline] directive inside your .ovpn config file. There's a good example here: Embedding key/cert/ca into client config


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The problem proved to be totally unrelated to OpenVPN, and the posted OpenVPN configurations are not to blame. The solution in my case was to disable a misbehaving QoS module from the kernel/ip stack. After that, the ping in my OpenVPN are in order of 150ms on a link with ping 100ms without OpenVPN.


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Looks like this bug related with OpenVZ limit on number of threads for VE. Please check column "failcnt" on row "numproc" in file /proc/user_beancounters.


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AFAIK iptables connection tracking and tun/tap modules is disabled by default on OVH VPS. You can email to OVH support about this issue. Unfortunately without configuration from hosting provider side you can't solve this issue.


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Most likely there are firewall rules in router_2 that prevent SSH access from the IP address space used by the routed mode tunnel Check the firewall in router_2.


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Your VPS does not support iptables, you will have to get your host to enable it for you. Alternatively get a VPS based on KVM or similar rather than containers like OpenVZ.



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