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9

A 64-bit version of Internet Explorer is available for 64-bit versions of Windows Vista/7. Nobody uses it, primarily because plug-in developers cough Adobe, specifically Flash cough will not bother writing a 64-bit version of their plug-ins, and who will browse the net if YouTube doesn't work? ;) It would work fine for opening large HTML files however. ...


5

It actually needs a running X to draw the widgets: unless the application has an option to be ran as a daemon or something, there's no straight way. But let's think: if we can redirect its display socket via SSH, maybe, we can accept all X requests and just do nothing? YES! Here's the receipt: First, you'll need to ssh -X user@server opera from a remote ...


4

Don't let your users install unapproved software in the first place


3

There is a 64-bit version of Firefox available. The browser itself works fine, however there is a severe limit of plugins available, no Flash for example, although I believe they have just released a 64-bit Java plugin. 64-bit versions of Windows come with a 64-bit version of Internet Explorer, but again you meet similar limitations with Flash and Java. ...


3

That is definately a security risk inside any company. I'd use wireshark or some other application to detect what ports Unite uses to share files, and then, if i have a firewall, block the outbound port, if i have a protocol filter, block the outbound protocol, and then with group policy, block the outbound application, and port in windows firewall. ...


2

For instructions to disable Opera Unite, or restricting it to your local network just follow the link. Blocking 8840 only will not disable Unite in any way! There is also a no install version of Opera called Opera@USB which does not require installation so using minimum privilege user accounts will not work. However Opera@USB obeys the settings in the ...


2

Opera Unite is not in and of itself a security risk. The web server portion is working with static html so no scripting or language vulnerabilities. The file serving is more an issue, especially if they allow you to share something like the root of your hard drive or a folder location with sensitive information. A firewall should be blocking this service ...


2

Looks like the architecture should allow you to block the Opera Unite Proxy servers to stop it from working. http://dev.opera.com/articles/view/opera-unite-developer-primer/


2

If your NAT router is also acting as a DNS server there have been known issues with IPv6 (AAAA) resolution in many cases. I can say that I run Opera (v9.63 & 10 beta) on a Debian machine pointing to a BIND resolver and native IPv6 and it all works fine.


2

At a guess, you are not running latest mod_wsgi 2.X version and are using Opera browser. There is a known issue with Opera and its use of HTTP 100-continue when using mod_wsgi daemon mode. This issue was fixed in mod_wsgi 2.4. Since though you don't say what version of mod_wsgi you are using, nor which browser you are using, this is only a guess.


1

Opera Unite attempts to set up a port-forward through the use of certain UPnP/IGD calls. (Home) routers that support UPnP port-traversal configuration will just set up the port forward. Opera Unite's central servers then handles the name resolution issues. Any enterprise router worth it's salt doesn't enable IGD.


1

SOLVED! $ opera -debugdns ... dns: Host 'google.com' resolved to 1.0.0.0 This is a typical malformed response from the broken DNS implementation found on some routers. Opera first looks for ipv6, and gets the wrong reply. The solution is to point resolv.conf to OpenDNS's DNS servers - 208.67.222.222 and 208.67.220.220. Now my resolv.conf looks like this: ...


1

"gets a zero-reply from the gateway" from your DNS server you mean ? If you dns server reply with an nul IPv6 address to AAAA request you probably have a problem on your DNS server !


1

Opera Unite by itself is not a security risk, but just like any P2P (or any program), it may be used by an attacker (if they find bugs, or is incorrectly configured, etc). Now, your questions brings an interesting point. You are doing security wrong (sorry to say that). The basic premises of security/firewall administration are: Least access (only allow ...



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