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20

I'd also recommend using a color scheme of sorts to quickly identify what a cable may originate from or go to. Granted labeling is always the #1 preferred method, color is something I use (when I can) to quickly visually eliminate some possibilities when wiring stuff up. For example: Black - From Servers to patch Blue - From patch to Switch Gray - From ...


18

I use the Brother P-touch labeler, too, with great success. Are you applying the label along the length of the cable? That might not work. What I do is print out the text twice on the same label (leaving some space in the middle). I then place the cable across the middle of the label and wrap the label around the cable, sticking the two adhesive sides ...


9

Different people like to do this different ways. I just moved a datacenter and chose to just label both ends of the cable with the same number. So I printed a bunch of numbered labels with 2 copies of each label. The only thing this really does is make sure it is easy to trace the cables. I like it however as it doesn't really have to be maintained in ...


9

As Kyle said, labelling each end of a cable with the same unique ID number is the most useful labelling method that requires zero maintenance. IMO everything else becomes unmaintainable very, very quickly. The main flaws are: You need full buy-in from everyone that's going to touch those cables and that's not always possible. If you label cables with info ...


8

Keep it simple. As simple as possible, but still allowing for security and flexibility. Design abstraction into things, which sounds like it's not simple, but in fact is the pathway to simplicity itself. As for subnets, this is fairly common: Users on one subnet Guests on another Servers on their own subnet VOIP on its own too. Filter traffic through ...


6

I worked at an organisation of a similar size (we had a /26), that for reasons beyond me, the powers-that-be felt that a finely grained IP allocation scheme was paramount to operational integrity. The gateway had to be .1, the printers had to be between .2 and .12, the servers between .13 and .20 and so on. We even kept documentation on individual hosts. ...


6

I often design a spreadsheet based on the expectations of accounting and the demands of my department. Typically, I find the most value from this by enabling alignment between IT and accounting as well as tracking historical and recurring spending. I typically break out recurring costs to a separate spreadsheet. For example, recurring support, licensing, ...


5

We use a Brady ID Pal label printer: http://cableorganizer.com/brady/brady-ID-pal.htm They are decently priced and the labels won't come off at all. You can print at various cable "girths/widths" along the length of the cable and it will automatically print it multiple lines to wrap the cable well so that you can see it from multiple angles. Example of ...


4

For IP allocations My advice is to place everything under the 10.0.0.0/8 subnet, using the following structure: 10.site.division.device site is a physical location or logical equivalent (e.g. NY office, NJ office, DR facility, Development environment). division is a logical subdivision that makes sense to you. e.g. 0 => Switches/Routers 1 => Admins, ...


3

One of the most important things to remember is that the file system doesn't do well with meta data. If there is more than one way to arrange data without someone consistently maintaining the structure things tend to get a bit mushed together and misplaced. I've been dealing with problems like this for years trying to get the IS department documentation in ...


3

I've gone off the idea of labeling cables as a general rule. Sure, some cables should be labeled but not all of them. Labeling is high maintenance and can become a real nightmare when things change. The purpose of labeling is to be able to know what the cable is for. This purpose in most cases can be better served by having a database of endpoints. You need ...


3

Not an easy one as every one has a different idea (as mentioned). We use a label printer Label Printers They are available in a wide range of prices. We also use different colored cables for different tasks. Red for us is always cross-wired, for example. Any power cords are labeled as to what is connected. Any system is labeled by DNS name where possible. ...


3

Labels are for wimps! Seriously though, for cables I use self-laminating printable cable tags - the kind that wrap around the cable and hang off like a little wing. These go on any wires (network, power, telco), and are written as: ServerName | SW### | CARD/PORTFor network cables. If the cable runs back to a patch panel, add that before or after the ...


3

We use the Brady IDXPERT to do our labeling. We use vinyl labels for the front and backs of servers. And Self Laminating labels for cabling, one one each end. Generally for the Cables we put Server name on line one, Switch port on line two, and Server port on line three. So you would get something like: SERVER1 SW01-P12 ETH0 Then we print up the ...


3

In addition to what sort of label to use, there is the question of what information it shows. I've found the following practice quite useful, especially when there are lots of short term changes. First, EVERY cable gets a matching label at both ends with a unique serial number (or better, its length + unique serial number). There is no significance to the ...


2

We have 38 Remote locations all running the same OS version. I just have 1 folder for each store, 1 for testing, and 1 for my main office, and 1 for my servers. Seems to run fine like this. It makes it easy to spot network issues if 1 store starts falling behind on updates. To roll out new updates, I filter all updates by needed and not approved. I will ...


1

for a quick check you can use the ARP Tables on your Cisco L3 Switches. Go to the Default Gateway Switch(es) and ping the Broadcast IP: ping 255.255.255.255 After that use the show arp command. You will receive the current ARP Table for all VLANs. You should also find an Error Message in the L3 Switch Logs when they discover a Duplicate IP. For long ...


1

Having tried a few different methods I've given up on labeling the cables. Regardless of the method used the labels either come off, become illegible or end up inside a bundle where they can't easily be read. Instead of labeling the cables I use a database in which I record the two end points of every cable in the server room. e.g. Server 1, NIC 2 connects ...


1

We use a little brother labeler for printing. Stick the label along the lenght of the cable, about 2-3 inches from the end. And on top we use a transparent heat shrink tube. Just remember to put a slice of the tube before installing the rj45 !! (or you will need a bigger tube) http://cableorganizer.com/heat-shrink/


1

Most of the servers we buy have sliding rails and come with cable management cages that attach to the back of the server so that once you route all your cables through them, you can slide the server out without disconnecting anything. For everything else, there are plastic zip ties or hook+loop (velcro) strips. The rack enclosures we have also generally ...


1

Both Dell and HP have server cable managment products however they only work with thier respective servers. These products work very well and are hands down the best out there. For a more general solution I have used thin wall felexable conduit for a few odd ball devices. This works well enough but not great.



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