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7

Interesting question. I've never dealt with it directly (restoring that far back) to care what happens to the OST files, so I found this article online: http://searchexchange.techtarget.com/answer/What-happens-to-ost-files-after-restoring-an-Exchange-backup To sum up what Brien thinks would happen: The contents on the Exchange server will be ...


5

Don't use cached mode...if you want to limit the size, Outlook 2013 can do that (slider on the account settings) easily. Not using cached mode with a local Exchange server isn't that big of a deal, as long as your Exchange server is always online. It's not ideal, but it's doable and won't cause any heartache for the users. Or you can have them use OWA ...


3

The autocomplete list is stored as an hidden message w/ the subject "IPM.Configuration.Autocomplete" in the Inbox folder of the user's mailbox. You can't get at it with Outlook, but other tools will let you. Call me heavy-handed, but I think I'd grab a copy of MFCMAPI and use it to backup an then delete the autocomplete cache. (As an aside: MFCMAPI is just ...


2

So clients within your network resolve your exchange server as exchsvr.internal via AD dns WHICH DOES NOT match the name on your certificate. The cert works for clients outside your network because the DNS name they use DOES match the certificate. You will have to convince your internal clients that they are connecting to your server as extdomain.org.au ...


2

You might consider a brutal hardware hack and just upgrade the servers disk space. As soon as you are hitting a limit with any program, you will soon run into problem with others too.


2

If you can avoid it, don't use cached mode on a Terminal Server. It's almost pointless to do so. One of the reasons to use cached mode is so that the client can use Outlook while disconnected from the network or from the Exchange server. The former would never happen, otherwise the user wouldn't be able to log on to the TS and therefore couldn't use Outlook ...


2

Yes, I've seen this - your clients may be also running OCS at login, or some other software that connects to the same MAPI profile; maybe some AV software, or other Outlook addon that starts up before Outlook itself. That's my guess. You could run ProcMon from Sysinternals and see what's opening the OST/PST for the user's MAPI profile before Outlook does. ...


1

Use Exchange management shell: Get-MailBox | FL Identity Get-MailBox <identity> |fl LegacyExchangeDN


1

OWA may be disabled for the mailbox. Have a check in Exchange Management Console, Mailbox preperties, tab Mailbox Feature, check if Outlook Web App is enabled.


1

Are you using Outlook as the email client? If so, you can perform an advanced find in the Deleted Items folder to find all items modified in a range that should work for you (today, yesterday, on or before, on or after, etc., etc.).


1

About that PowerShell snippet: You're assigning and piping at the same time. And you're doing it wrong. Those are two separate statements: $BlockedSenders = Get-Content .\blockedsenders.txt Set-SenderFilterConfig -BlockedSenders $BlockedSenders About the larger problem at hand: You need the users to specify which ones are sending spam, and which ones ...


1

You could use one of two methods, both require some input/work from the end user and the IT staff. Option 1: Use Outlook Rules and apply a rule that states that when an email is received from HR to not forward it (whether by OOF or some other means). The problem here, is that you have to leave Outlook running on the users computer for the rule to function ...


1

I haven't done this, but it seems like you could probably do this in Exchange 2010/2013 using Information Rights Management (IRM). If you've ever seen Outlook messages marked as "Do not forward", this is what I'm talking about. You can configure it in Exchange Management Console from the Hub Transport server or via the New-OutlookProtectionRule cmdlet. ...


1

We enabled cached mode on Terminal Servers because it was the only way to get Instant Search to work in Outlook 2013 connected to Exchange 2013.


1

You need to use Exchange 2013 CAS and not 2010 CAS. As soon as you deployed first Exchange 2013 CAS in the organization, all the connection must be made to it, as it will broker the access to the legacy environment (Exchange 2010).


1

If they have rules, try exporting all of their rules. then run outlook /cleanrules from the outlook.exe directory and see if that fixes the issue.


1

What you're looking for won't work - at least not in a supported way. If you've read the Exchange 2010 multitenancy guides - they specifically address this: The URLs and hostnames configured returned to clients are the same across the system. It is not possible to configure tenant specific URLs to be returned via AutoDiscover. The recommendation ...


1

Just resolved this issue with Microsoft support. The 3 users not receiving < OAB URL > from autodiscover.xml had a specific (and the wrong) OAB configured in their AD Object setting "msExchUseOAB", instead of being "< not set >". With the entries for "msExchUseOAB" cleared, OAB settings were obtained from Autodiscover.


1

I faced the same problem but for some reason it all sorted out when I upgraded my MS Office to Service Pack 2 and I also deleted the stored user name and password with the following command rundll32.exe keymgr.dll, KRShowKeyMgr.



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