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4

Thanks to the pointers provided by Mark Henderson, I finally nailed this one. I had to change two objects in EMS: Set-WebServicesVirtualDirectory -identity "ourserver\ews (Default Web Site)" ` -InternalUrl https://support.ourdomain.au/EWS/Exchange.asmx ` -ExternalUrl https://support.ourdomain.au/EWS/Exchange.asmx Set-ClientAccessServer -identity ...


4

I'm still a little lost as to your explanation of why you are doing what you are doing with the port 53 block. Your internal DNS within your firewall should have no reason to be exposed to the internet, so you are right to block inbound port 53 to it on your firewall. Your external DNS should provide name resolution for your external (internet facing) ...


3

outlook anywhere is RPC over HTTP - it's just a name change. Outlook anywhere's auto configuration is an outlook 2010 ability. Older clients can still use outlook anywhere but must be manually configured. An additional feature (under the outlook anywhere umbrella) is client redirection, which you would set up if you wanted to use SSL or a specific CAS ...


3

I had this same problem, and it took some digging, as the Exchange Remote Connectivity tool error message is quite misleading. What this turned out to be, for me, was a reference to a CAS server that had recently been removed, in the databases' RPCClientAccessServer property. (As a bit of background, Exchange is new in my environment, and I had set up ...


3

A better solution: Create DNS zones for autodiscover.ourdoamainname.com and remote.ourdomainname.com. Create an A record in each zone with no hostname and point it to your Exchange server. Another option is to look into what it takes to enable NAT hairpinning. On Sonicwall firewalls, I believe you need to use the 1-to-1 NAT feature in order to enable this. ...


3

Yes you can continue to use your 03 box as a mail server. You can also have it as your "SMTP Gateway/Transport" still if it is where all your email comes into from the internet. OWA will be tricky since you can only have it pointing to a single server. So existing mailboxes on the 2003 box won't be able to use OWA until they are migrated (unless you go ...


2

You can install the certificate as follows: Open IE on the remote computer (as administrator if you're running under UAC) and browse to the remote website address, accept the certificate as normal when prompted. On the address bar, click on the certificate error message drop down, and click 'View certificate' In the certificate window, click 'Install ...


2

It's actually more an Active Directory issue than an Exchange one. Both DOMAIN\USERNAME and USERNAME@DOMAIN are functionally the same for Windows. So unless the email domain is the same as the Windows domain, by default, USER@EMAILDOMAIN.COM will not work to log the user in. That being said, you CAN do a work around by adding the email domain as a UPN ...


2

Outlook Anywhere can be tricky. One of the better resources for this is a site Microsoft runs that checks it from the outside. https://www.testexchangeconnectivity.com/ Use credentials you don't mind getting out. Or a test account. Outlook Anywhere also has different contexts for 'inside' and 'outside' as you're learning. Set-ClientAccessServer ...


1

This turned out to be a DNS configuration problem. For some reason that I will never understand, this client was using a local host file to resolve certain domain names. One of the entries in here included the host name of the internal mail server, but pointed to an old IP address. Essentially, Outlook attempted to look up the internal address and received ...


1

What you're looking for won't work - at least not in a supported way. If you've read the Exchange 2010 multitenancy guides - they specifically address this: The URLs and hostnames configured returned to clients are the same across the system. It is not possible to configure tenant specific URLs to be returned via AutoDiscover. The recommendation ...


1

This is what I did: Installed a temporary certificate from an internal CA on the Exchange server, with both public names as SANs (so TMG can connect to Exchange using both names). Changed all Exchange external URLs to use the new public name. Registered the new public name in the public DNS using a different public IP address on TMG. Created a new ...


1

is the "https://MS2010.MYDOMAIN.local" the URL you're trying to connect to externally? I could be reading your autodiscover wrong, but that's what I'm seeing. If so, that's probably your issue. You need to set your external domain in the outlook anywhere to match what your actual external OWA address is. ...


1

You can configure Oulook to prefer RPC/HTTPS connections instead of direct RPC even if it's available, but if I understand your question correctly, those are external clients and you don't manage them, so it would be left to the users to configure it correctly. You can't disable MAPI access on the Exchange server, as it would block "true" internal users and ...


1

provided you can extract user-agent strings from your logs... For Outlook 2007+ (I haven't worked with Office 2003 in some time, I can't remember) they each have their own User agent, so you can look that up via google for more details. I find sites like user-agent-string.info useful (or any others, I have no affiliation with that one but seems to come up ...


1

The simple act of introducing an Exchange 2007 server in an existing Exchange 2003 infrastructure doesn't change anything at all about mail flow or client access. Things start to actually change when you reconfigure your firewall to expose your new server to the Internet instead of the old one, and/or when you move mailboxes to the new server. There are two ...


1

You're seeing something that feels like the as-designed behaviour of the Microsoft DNS Server. By default, the DNS Server itself registers A records for all addresses the server listens for requests on. I'm wondering if this Exchange Server computer also happens to be a DNS server. If I'm right, and assuming you're not using the second NIC's IP address as a ...


1

As with all things in Small Business Server, it is best to make sure you go about this in an SBS-sanctioned way--I've gotten myself in trouble in SBS assuming that since I could get a feature working in the full product, I should be able to make it work on SBS no problem... SBS has many moving parts all installed on a single server which creates some unique ...


1

The user must be logged into the PC with an Active Directory account The primary mailbox that they are accessing must be the same one as the account they are logged in as. If both of the above are not true, then you will have to enter a password to access Outlook. However, if the above is true and you still have problems, more issues may be at play.


1

Windows 7, Server 2008, and I believe even Vista don't support NTLMv1 by default. If it's working on XP, but not Windows 7 I would start by enabling NTLMv1 and seeing if it resolves your issue. Here's the post that helped me when I had a similar issue. ...


1

Loading rpcping.exe into Dependency Walker, it's clear that it uses WinHttp.dll instead of WinInet.dll. So, copying the WinHttp.dll from Windows XP SP3 into C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office11 where Outlook.exe is located causes Outlook to send HTTP/1.0 requests with User-Agent and all the other header fields just like it did on my old computer. ...


1

I managed to get this working by using NTLM authentication. In the EMC I enabled this by going to Server Configuration ? Client Access and the properties of the mail server. Then on the outlook anywhere tab chose NTLM authentication as the method. Then on outlook, in the account settings > more settings window > security tab I set Logon Network Security ...



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