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11

You need to define AD Sites in Active Directory Sites and Services. You then specify what subnets define each site. Then you can assign Domain Controllers to that site. If you have a world-wide distribution of the same AD Domain, you should absolutely set this up, because not only are your mail servers using random DCs across the world, but your ...


8

This is a DNS problem, not a OWA one. If your firewall/proxy can't handle requests for domainname.com from the inside, then you will need to create a "shadow" zone for domainname.com in your internal DNS servers, which maps your public names to internal IP addresses. This way, domainname.com will map to some public IP address when resolver from the ...


5

No, possibly for security reasons. Users should not know that fact. Well, THE user may want to know, but the HACKER that tries to log in as the user should KNOW know that his password attempt was not rejected for a wrong password but because he got locked out. Basic security 101 is to give the hacker as little information as possible.


4

Add the OWA server itself to the user's "Log On To" list and see how things work. It's surprising me a bit that the restriction would apply in the case of a non-interactive logon but it's worth a shot.


4

The simple answer is you can't. There is no native functionality in OWA in Exchange 2003 to display mailbox sizes. You could look at setting quotas to something low and setting it for warn only which would notify users that they are over quota but not limit them otherwise. You could also script your existing workaround to export users and mail them and ...


4

Indeed you can. Your question got me curious so I tested it and it works. In the web.config of the OWA app (which by default lives in \Program Files\Microsoft\Exchange Server\ClientAccess\Owa on the drive where you installed Exchange), set the following in the <system.web> section: <httpCookies httpOnlyCookies="true" requireSSL="true"/>


3

What you are looking at (when you use a non IE browser) is OWA Lite. OWA Lite misses out on: Spelling Checker Reading Pane Notifications and Reminders Weekly Calendar Views Windows SharePoint Services and Windows File Share Integration HTML Message Format Right-Click Menu Drag and Drop Explicit Logon Type-down Search Resource Mailbox Management Color ...


3

Are you using IE8 to access OWA? If so you need to add your OWA site to the trusted site list in IE8 for it to download properly.


3

You cannot use the Change Password functionality without implementing SSL. KB297121


3

This could be a problem with the certificate associated to the OWA web site. Can you check the certificate on that server?


3

It depends on your definition of secure. Many companies expose their client access servers to the internet with nothing but a traditional firewall in front of it, opening just port 443. If you do this, you'd be wise to monitor the Microsoft monthly patches and keep the server up to date with Windows and Exchange patches. If you're not comfortable doing this, ...


3

It's similar to this problem here: Exchange mail users cannot send to certain lists Bring up a new email in OWA, start to type the offending address, when it come's up, hit delete. That should clear it.


3

Exchange 2010 SP1 introduces Internet Calendar Sharing, which essentially allows you to do what you want. The Exchange team posted a very detailed blog post recently about the topic, which I highly recommend you read over. Basically, Exchange publishes your calendar in iCal format which anybody can subscribe to. The instructions to set it up are in this ...


3

All you only need to: Open Exchange Management Shell (EMS)-run as administrator. Copy and paste the following code into EMS: cd to ‘C:\Program Files\Microsoft\Exchange Server\V14\Bin’ Run UpdateCas.ps1 UpdateCas.ps1 That’s it! OWA folders will be populated with the required files again and voila! OWA is back online.


3

Click Share>Add Calendar on the toolbar part of the calendar view in OWA.


3

NOT for the faint of heart...use MDB Viewer to delete the folder: http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?displaylang=en&id=1784 MDB -> Open Message Store MDB -> Open Root Folder Open IPM_SUBTREE, then inbox, then finance, then budget. Select Finance. Change operation to Delete folder. Call function. Select DEL_FOLDERS and DEL_MESSAGES. ...


2

Yes it is. You can have a look at this KB Article for how to do it with forms based authentication. I believe you can also use basic authentication on the OWA site via IIS in order for the browser to prompt you for authentication. If you go that route I'd highly recommend also using SSL for your OWA install.


2

The issue has been resolved, OWA is up & running. It involved having to un-and-re-install IIS 7 (which is just awful, BTW), un-and-re-installing Client Access components, and deleting & re-creating all virtual directories. Thanks to all for your info & suggestions.


2

The latest rollout appears to be missing both gifs and scripts, but OWA always referred to the folder corresponding to the latest rollup, rather than the folder 'current'. My solution was to copy the contents of E:\Program Files\Microsoft\Exchange Server\ClientAccess\Owa\8.1.240.5 to E:\Program Files\Microsoft\Exchange Server\ClientAccess\Owa\8.1.393.1. ...


2

Also depends in what -- if anything -- you're using for management; in some cases SCOMs requries a certificate (I don't know the details). I set up a cert for a Exchange 2007 hosted at a IaaS site, and ended up with 5 names on the cert... Examine your needs .. a shopping list to get started with is: The computers internal NetBIOS network name. The ...


2

You can try this first: http://support.microsoft.com/?id=883380 And if that doesn't work, try this: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/320202


2

I'm not sure how you're turning off Cached Exchange Mode in your testing, but Outlook 2003 and 2007 will function fine w/o creating an .OST file so long as Cached Exchange Mode is disabled. Having said that, Cached Exchange Mode is helpful in many circumstances and, typically, doesn't impact the user negatively (since most PCs today have entirely too much ...


2

If you are not using AD DNS for your External DNS needs, then you can add "domainname.com" to your AD DNS, using your internal IP address. This will solve your problem by providing the internal IP address to people in the office, but people outside will still resolve your external IP address as they do now. However, once you add domainname.com to your AD ...


2

Aside from usage sending / receiving email usage, because using http-rpc is a Cached mode of operation at the base level it is more bandwidth efficient than a non-cached mode of operation. In cached mode the clients check in with the server only periodically thus, if they are not checking in with the server they are not using bandwidth. If you are ...


2

This is almost certainly a time zone issue in OWA. Outlook adopts the time zone of the host operating system; both of your client machines are configured for the same time zone, so the appointment is displayed at the same time on both machines in Outlook. Outlook Web Access can't make the assumption that the client machine where the web browser is ...


2

You may be able to do this through an add-on IIS component, but most places do it with an IDS/IPS device. The device sits on the network and sniffs traffic, and it should know a bit about the application. When it sees repeated bad login attempts, it should block or rate-limit the attacker IP address.



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