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44

To find all Debian managed configuration files which have been changed from the default you can use a command like this. dpkg-query -W -f='${Conffiles}\n' '*' | awk 'OFS=" "{print $2,$1}' | md5sum -c 2>/dev/null | awk -F': ' '$2 !~ /OK/{print $1}' Edit (works with localized systems): dpkg-query -W -f='${Conffiles}\n' '*' | awk 'OFS=" "{print $2,$1}' ...


14

from man debsums: debsums -ce List changed configuration files.


14

Select a new front end by setting your env. DEBIAN_FRONTEND=noninteractive apt-get -y install x11-common I use this all the time in automating package installation with cfengine.


12

The Debian packaging system is one of the most elegant methods of installing, upgrading, and removing software available in a public repository. If you need to build and maintain an unofficial Debian package repository, you may consider some tips. Here I will describe briefly some steps to get your public Debian repository. Firstly, install some necessary ...


11

If you are not afraid do get your hands dirty, the best way to do this is : apt-cache show packagename It will show you all the different version of the package that you can install, according to your sources.list definition. You will get something like that ( this is how it looks for me ): root@shiny-desktop:/home/shiny# apt-cache show ...


11

aptitude considers packages that are installed due to dependencies to be "automatically" installed. With that knowledge, you can quickly construct an aptitude search pattern to list all installed packages that where not automatically installed: aptitude search "?and(?installed, ?not(?automatic))" Alternatively, using short form for the search terms: ...


9

I recommend to use Fedora EPEL instead: "Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux (EPEL) is a volunteer-based community effort from the Fedora project to create a repository of high-quality add-on packages for Red Hat Enterprise (RHEL) and its compatible spinoffs such as CentOS or Scientific Linux. Fedora is the upstream of RHEL and add-on ...


9

Try with apt-cache madison myPackage Quote from man page: It displays available versions of a package in a tabular format.


9

The lowest. Seriously - the lowest standard ShockWatch label/sticker is 25G. A 25G shock is pretty severe (easily enough to dislodge boards, snap backplanes, etc). You should also label your packaging "FRAGILE" and instruct your recipients to refuse delivery if there is ANY evidence of damage to the box (a crushed corner is often the only outward sign of a ...


8

I generally like to setup etckeeper on the system pretty much immediately. With something like etckeeper I can find not only when the file is different, but I can actually get a diff of exactly how it is different. See: Using revision control for server configuration files? What tool do you recommend to track changes on a Linux/Unix server.


8

In command line: GD Support: $ php -i | grep "GD " (keep the space, it's necessary) FreeType Support: $ php -i | grep "FreeType"


8

Add multilib_policy=best to your /etc/yum.conf Yum will now try to install the "best" package.arch for your system and it will only install that one (as long as it is available). Assuming you're on a 64-Bit system, yum will first try to install package.x86_64, if that doesn't exist it will fall back to i386 and noarch. The default setting is ...


7

Per my comment, I don't believe there is an equivalent to the "packages.debian.org" central package archive (with web interface) in CentOS. It's something I think is really missing!


6

I disagree wholeheartedly with Kyle. If it is not necessary, it should be removed. It's a best practice to not install unnecessary software. The person undertaking the task, such as yourself, should be confident in the implications of the decisions they are making. Removing standard system utilities and libraries is generally frowned upon but that will ...


6

Not having manually install x11-common, I am not sure what questions you are being asked. But if they are coming from debconf, then you should be able to pre-answer the questions with debconf-set-selections.


6

I started with this, which got me a list of CentOS mirrors, and then picked the first mirror, and then navigated to the list of packages for CentOS 6.


5

It's generally better to stay clear, and I don't think that answer will surprise you. Fedora RPM's can have dependencies on versions of software that do not exist on CentOS. For example, the Python 2.6 ABI is not available on CentOS - no matter what version - but is the default on Fedora. Apart from this, it is also very possible that Fedora RPM's will use ...


5

In /etc/apt/preferences: Package: * Pin: release a=jaunty Pin-Priority: 1001 Then aptitude install pulseaudio (and any other packages that won't get automatically downgraded as a dependency). This may well cause problems down the line (downgrades aren't officially supported or well-tested) but this will at least get the versions down to jaunty ones.


5

If you want yum to behave like apt-get (not to update the metadata by each run), edit /etc/yum.conf and put there: metadata_expire=never or metadata_expire=7d in case you want to update the metadata after a week. If you run yum makecache, your metadata will be updated like by apt-get update in Debian. But keep in mind that if you use "never" in the ...


5

Unless there are Red Hat developers/product managers here, I don't think you'll get an answer justifying this. It's especially perplexing in the "Server" product. Either way, it's trivial to remove the packages in %post, or Kickstart with %packages --nobase and start with a minimal installation and build up your package list from there. Erase packages ...


5

I'd say that this may not be worth the effort. If disk space isn't an issue and you're not running any extraneous services, there's no real impact or need to create a minimal installation. If anything, it becomes an annoyance when you need certain tools (nmap, lsof, a compiler, etc.) In the end, my kickstarts are either minimal+packages installed via Puppet ...


4

Or debsums -e | grep FAILED which will also show all missing conffiles (from the debsums package)


4

If you have the repositories configured on your server "yum list" will show you which packages come from which repositories (or are already installed) in the third column. [root@cobbler ~]# yum list | egrep 'foo|cobbler' cobbler.x86_64 1.6.6-1.el5 installed foomatic.x86_64 ...


4

If you like to know which package versions are included into some particular Debian/Ubuntu/Backports release, rmadison tool from devscripts package could be the answer. For example: $ rmadison -u debian,ubuntu,bpo mercurial | cut -d "|" -f 1-3 debian: mercurial | 0.9.1-1+etch1 | etch-m68k mercurial | 0.9.1-1+etch1 | oldstable mercurial | ...


4

You need to dpkg-reconfigure debconf and tell it to "Ignore questions with a priority less than: Critical". This doesn't get you out of answering critical questions.


4

AFP can be handled by netatalk. This might have issues, though. See below. Mail: You can choose between a wide variety of packages: SMTP could be handled by Sendmail, Postfix or Exim, IMAP by Dovecot, Courier or Cyrus, just to name some popular variants. Load balancing: I am not familiar with Crossroads and what you want to load-balance, but I am sure ...


4

I don't have an OpenSolaris 'server' to hand but the desktop I have handy has packagemanager (gui) and pkg (command line) installed. If you have access to packagemanager then you can add the webstack repository gksu /usr/bin/packagemanager File->Manage Repositories Name: Webstack URL: http://pkg.opensolaris.org/webstack Add ...


4

First, it appears you aren't really using a regular OpenSolaris distribution but kind of an old fork of it. pkgin is a pkgsrc front-end and is available on recent Joyent servers. On older ones, you should use pkg_add instead, and on even older ones using Blastwave as repository, pkg-get is the way to go. Have a look at this page for details: ...


4

Though this won't install the package, you can transfer them from a package file (aka a datastream package) to a spool location with the pkgtrans command: pkgtrans filename.pkg /home/user/temporary_package_prefix This will extract the package file system hierarchy as well as the pkginfo file and any pre/post install scripts into your directory.


4

The answer to this question suggests that automatically pulling the license info out of a single .deb package is non-trivial. I suspect there is no easy way to do what you want. Since the answer I linked to has been updated, I'll update mine too. This is beginning to change, as the debian/copyright file is now required to be machine-interpretable, so ...



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