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Because I did not want to alter the live configuration of PAM on the system, I ended up using a chroot jail to setup a default PAM configuration so I can view the differences: # lsb_release --codename Codename: trusty # debootstrap trusty /tmp/foo I: Retrieving Release I: Retrieving Release.gpg ... View the differences: for f in ...


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dpkg should prompt and allow you to see a diff (with D) in case there are changes made to your configuration files: Configuration file `/etc/bash.bashrc' ==> Modified (by you or by a script) since installation. ==> Package distributor has shipped an updated version. What would you like to do about it ? Your options are: Y or I : install ...


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You could make a copy of the whole directory and then run a diff on each file to check for differences cp -r /etc/pam.d/ /home/<user>/ pam-auth-update --force diff /etc/pam.d/ /home/<user>/pam.d Once carefully going through each diff you can then decide if you want to keep the changes or revert back to the old ones. Reverting is as simple as ...


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Set krb5_auth = yes in /etc/security/pam_winbind.conf. This file should be safe from any updates by authconfig. You could use auth sufficient pam_winbind.so use_first_pass krb5_auth in pam, but that might be overridden by authconfig.


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I ended up using authconfig afterall, which means that I had to prepare a full kerberized environment. authconfig --enablewinbindkrb5 --update Note for anyone else who is planning to use this, this command updates the PAM stack, I believe it invalidates the config in /etc/security/pam_winbind.conf and also modifies /etc/samba/smb.conf. In order to use it ...



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