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The farther away from the inside of the disk platters you go, the higher the velocity of the head relative to the platter is. Therefore you can see peak sequential transfer speeds of up to 2X when comparing the outermost area of a hard drive platter to the innermost. This can be verified with a utility such as HDTune. To take advantage of this, those ...


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I fixed my issue. Luckily my second raid1 array has a totally identical partition table, so I used sgdisk (the proper way this time) copying the partition table from a disk of that other raid1.


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You can use testdisk to recover your partition table. TestDisk is a free and open source data recovery utility it can: Recover deleted partition Rebuild partition table Rewrite the Master boot record (MBR) Here a simple howto


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I know you can do the following in Linux LVM and can only assume that it may be possible on other OS's: Use the Volume Manager to set up your redundancy and data striping for reliability and performance. Simply use both disks as physical volumes for a LVM volume group and create a LVM logical volume with the correct redundancy and striping when setting ...


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Typically the steps are: Resize the partitions to match the new disk size. You seem to have done that already. Resize the LVM Volgume group to make the new space in the partition available to the volume manager: vgextend Resize the Logical Volume with the file-system you want to extend: lvresize note: don't mistake the --size <new capacity> for ...


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I recently wrote a long answer on why you'd want partitions in the first place here. In short: use LVM and not native partitions. two LVM partitions (one for swap and the second with a root file system containing everything) is not necessarily bad. more partitions can be beneficial, but if you do, start with minimally sized ones and leave space ...


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First off, I recommend not breaking the RAID. The performance and reliability gains of RAID-1 over 2 independent disks are worth it. If you're not particularly well-versed in Linux, the default partition scheme that Ubuntu suggests is generally fine. If you have other needs, then here's a good starting point. Adjust as necessary, for example if you have a ...


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What you're after is findmnt. For example: $ findmnt -rn -S UUID=xxxxxxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxxxxxxxxxx -o TARGET /mnt/mountpoint or $ findmnt -rn -S PARTUUID=xxxxxxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxxxxxxxxxx -o TARGET /mnt/mountpoint If nothing is mounted matching that UUID, nothing is output and the return code is 1 (failure), otherwise, the mountpoint is output ...


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Parted doesn't work on ext4 on Centos. I had to use fdisk to delete and recreate the partition, which (I validated) works without losing data. I followed the steps at http://geekpeek.net/resize-filesystem-fdisk-resize2fs/ fdisk /dev/sdx c u p d p w fdisk /dev/sdx c u p n p 1 (default) (default) p w


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You have exhausted the number of inodes available in your filesystem. It's likely that you have a directory somewhere with a crap-ton of small files, hopefully some type of temporary files that can be deleted without issue. You'll need to find that directory and asses whether or not the files are critical. Beyond that, you'll need to consider creating a new ...


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The other answered provided do not address your question, I've identified the correct command to rescan an already connected disk. We must rescan your already connected disk, first identify which disk you want to rescan. ls /sys/class/scsi_disk/ In my example, I see a symlink named 0:0:0:0, so we rescan this scsi-disk. echo '1' > ...


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I needed to expand the OS partition to upgrade my Dell server with a PERC array from Windows Server 2003 to 2008. Dell publishes a custom utility, ExtPart.exe (32-bit), to extend the OS partition on a PERC array. http://www.dell.com/support/home/us/en/19/Drivers/DriversDetails?driverid=R64398 Notes: 1) It does not run under 64-bit; you need to boot a ...


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LVM supports using the whole disk , without a partition table, for use as LVM physical volume. (The same holds true for SAN and iSCSI LUN's etc.) Normally I still recommend creating the partition table because: a partition table prevents other (non-Linux) systems from seeing the disk volume as raw/un-partitioned free space. That may not be a risk in ...


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A little more info about your raid and partitions would be useful for a complete answer, but if a partition on /dev/sda is part of the md0 raid, you can do the following: Backup full system. Move data from /data to a temporary folder on sda3. Unmount and destroy the md0 raid and its partitions. Depending on your partition layout, you might now be able to ...


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You have a typical problem with 2TiB MBR limit. Possible solutions: Use GPT instead of MBR. But you will need to use UEFI bootloader an UEFI-compatible motherboard to boot from GPT. Create a small LUN <2TiB ib size (VD, Virtual Disk in terms of LSI MegaRAID) on your RAID controller and then create a second LUN on the same RAID group.


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If you have LVM enabled, you can extend your LVM volume. The steps are: Format /dev/md0 as a primary partition with the LVM (8e) partition type using fdisk Finding the name of your existing volume group with vgdisplay Adding the new partition to the existing volume group with vgextend <name of vg> /dev/md0 Extending the logical volume with the newly ...


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/dev/md0 is a software RAID device which may consume part of the physical space on the SDA disk drive, but most likely consists of two or more other disks. (check /proc/mdstat to confirm the layout). That makes it unlike that the space from there can easily be added to the root file-system. What probably is sufficient : rather than extending the root ...



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