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For me activating it did it: vgchange -a y. After that the /dev/$vgname/* and /dev/mapper/$vgname-* devices immediately showed up. Edit: Also required use_lvmetad = 1 instead of 0 in /etc/lvm/lvm.conf to make it mount on boot. Using update-initramfs -u after activating might or might not have had something to do with it.


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These steps can be done while booted, to extend your volume group. I am assuming sda5 is the new LVM partition, not sda3. pvcreate /dev/sda5 vgextend sun-vg /dev/sda5 Then you should fsck the file system. This can't be done online. You would need to boot a CD or something else. This is optional, but should be done to prevent damage during resize. fsck ...


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While I think that this is over your current knowledge and you would first need to understand basic concepts, such as what is a disk, a block device, a partition, a filesystem etc, here's the simplest solution. Use pvcreate and create LVM on top of the disks: pvcreate --pvmetadatacopies 3 /dev/sd{a,b,c,d,e,f,g,h} Use vgcreate to create Volume Groups (you ...


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You can select what partition/disk you apply Windows to by going to the task sequence and selecting your install operating system task. After you select it you will notice that there is a section (under the "Operating system to install:" selection box) that allows you to define where the OS will be installed to. My installation automatically collects the ...


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Based on your comments I would suggest: Use your hardware RAID controller to create a mirrored (RAID 1) volume for the operating system. This volume should be designated as your boot drive in your BIOS settings. With many raid controllers/drivers this volume will then appear as /dev/sda to your CentOS system. If the remaining drives are also connected to ...


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I can feel your pain, I am relatively new at Linux as well, so I understand your pain. LVMs is the way to go, they can be easily expanded. If you are registered to Red Hat, then you can install the GUI (yum -y install system-config-lvm). Once installed, on the CMD line run the 'system-config-lvm' this will launch the GUI and from there you can view the ...


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Two things: Linux only reads partition tables when disks are initially detected by the system (i.e. at boot time or when connected later). You can use the partprobe command to rescan the partition table on demand. N.B. On some distributions partprobe has problems with rescanning the partition table of the boot drive and a reboot may be required. After ...


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You could move the 2nd partition sdb2 to the end of the "disk" and then recreate the first, by then you will have the ability to recreate the first one with "full" size. However depending on your filesystem you should not need to delete it but rather "only" unmount it, and then do resize2fs (at least for ext2/3/4) , after doing the above move. The move ...


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For GPT Partitioned Disks Only On a GPT formatted disk each partition is assigned a GUID, which is a form of UUID, though probably not what the original poster was referring to. Therefore this answer is probably less helpful to the original questioner. Nevertheless I believe there's an important distinction to be noticed. To get the GUID of partition 1 on ...



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