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Your problem and my problem almost the same: I can see drives in disk management, but non of the partitions were executable, in my windows explorer the drive letters were gone. in my case, disk-part shows everything correctly, and the following method resolved my issue. Please remove the problematic physical hard drive, attached to another running machine, ...


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899M available of 96M size /tmp doesn't make sense, nor does 765M available of 5G /var. Is your table correct? None of your file systems say 2G free. Free up space or make bigger partitions. If some of /var frees up, a symlink from /var/tmp to /tmp may work. Perhaps some deleted files are still open, reboot.


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You can do almost the same thing that VMware p2v software does. What it does is create the new filesystems on the new system exactly as you want them to be, then do a tar of the filesystems across to the other server. This way you get everything exactly the same, and you are only copying files and space that are currently being used. Then you have to do ...


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You could increase the size of /dev/xvda1 by going into fdisk, deleting /dev/xvda2 partition which will then be unusable, then in fdisk remove partition /dev/xvda1(but remember starting and ending blocks of the disk), then create a new /dev/xvda1 on the excactly the same start block, but on a bigger/higher end block. After this you could grow your /dev/xvda1 ...


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Your simpleset solution here is likely to be to move the website data and assets into /dev/xvda2, reconfigure your webserver DocumentRoot(s) to point to it, and restart your web services. If you have SELinux enables you will have to ensure that the files are correctly labeled (user_home_t) and set a boolean httpd_enable_homedirs.


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You need to extend the extended partition (4) first. Then you can extend/replace the logical ones.


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Yes, you can shrink/move/grow an online root partition without any reboots (nor livecd, nor usbkey): consult this answer. It's very well written and easy to follow, although quite long and a little risky. This allows to bypass limitation of resize2fs not being able to shrink ext4 partitions. Of course, if you only want to grow your ext4 partition, you can ...


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You can shrink an online root partition without any reboots: consult this answer. This answer is very well written and easy to follow. So this would work on any type of dedicated or VPS solution. TLDR; this solution implies to pivot_root to tmpfs so you can umount safely your root partition live and fiddle with it. Once done, you'll pivot_root back on your ...


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In your position I would either Reinstall the OS and configure the partitions that I wanted rather than accepting the ones that OVH provided. This is fairly straightforward using the OVH manager to access the remote conole. Just download a suitable ISO to your local machine and attach it as an iso device to the remote console then reboot and install as you ...


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If your existing PV has < 300GB of data If your existing PV has less than 300GB of data on it, then you can simply relocate that data to the front of the disk and then use pvresize. First, create a new pv: pvcreate /dev/sda1 Relocate data from the existing pv onto the new pv: pvmove /dev/sda2 /dev/sda1 Remove the old pv: vgreduce myvg /dev/sda2 ...


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First you create a directory /mnt/home # mkdir /mnt/home But then you mount /dev/sda2 to mount, which shadows over /mnt/ # mount /dev/sda2 /mnt Then try and map to a folder that does not exist as you never made the folder on sda2 which you mapped to /mnt/ # mount /dev/sda3 /mnt/home Is this intended? This would work # mount /dev/sda2 /mnt # mkdir ...


5

This is because you created /mnt/home before mounting something to /mnt. When you did that, the "home" directory is hidden by the newly mounted /mnt filesystem. You need to: (after unmounting everything above) mount /dev/sda2 /mnt mkdir /mnt/home mount /dev/sda3 /mnt/home


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I have always simply used parted for this. It works well for changing the disklabel type and adding/removing partitions, especially since it can handle modern large HDDs unlike fdisk. You can run $ sudo parted /dev/sda This will get things started and get you into the parted terminal. You can then run the help command to show all the available commands. ...


1

There's actually one compelling reason not to split up your partitions in EC2: ...a baseline performance of 3 IOPS/GiB... General purpose SSD volumes -- which tend to offer the best price/performance value -- can handle more I/O operations per second, the larger they are. General Purpose (SSD) volume performance is governed by volume size, which ...


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Well so far I found the solution on my own. http://bhaisaab.org/logs/lvm-cloning/ posted a HowTo to obtain the desired result. For me, everything from pvdisplay up to the end was absolutely clear and should be save. I just did not know, that it is possible to use fdisk to delete the partition first and after that just to create a new one with the full size ...



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