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I think this one-line command could help: for i in $(df -h | grep mapper | cut -d" " -f1); do echo $i; lvdisplay --maps $i | grep "Physical volume"; done The output is similar to this: /dev/mapper/myserver-root Physical volume /dev/sda5 /dev/mapper/SambaShares Physical volume /dev/sdb1 Physical volume /dev/sdo1 Physical volume /dev/sdp ...


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You can forward X11 through ssh and open gparted GUI in your client. If your client is a Windows machine, you can use putty and xming. An example guide can be http://www.geo.mtu.edu/geoschem/docs/putty_install.html Once you have configured Xming and putty, open session with putty to your server, launch "sudo gparted" (if it is installed, if not, install it ...


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You cut the poor filesystem in half. If you used LVM based image it would be much easier, as it keeps history of changes to volumes and it is relatively easy to recover from resize operation. It is very unlikely to ever boot again. But you might be able to save at least something. It depends how valuable the data there were. So if you have not done ...


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These days if you are running a 32GB or 64GB server 4 GB of swap for the default is a safe amount. Anything later than that is overkill with that much physical RAM available.


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I've found that it is easier and safer to do a compressed tar backup, re-install the OS to your new configuration and then restore the files. Also, no matter how much RAM, I still leave 4GB for swap because you don't know what other machine might be running those disks in the future. But you are right, 63GB for swap is very high these days.


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You could create a loopback-filesystem on each device, then group those into a raid-0. However, why not get an appropriately sized filesystem for your 80G instead of a hacked together pseudo-device?


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This isn't really how dd works. The partition table is on the raw disk and to restore those 12 partitions you will end up overwriting your current partition table. You're going to have to dd the .bin to a raw disk somewhere and then create a new .bin for each individual partition. You can then setup the partitions as needed in the allocated space and dd ...


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with RHEL7, one can grow file system using xfs_growfs(8), needless to say it is risky and before doing anything like that, make sure you have backup.. I asked similar question about a year ago and @Michael Hampton answer it: redhat - How to Increase the Size of an XFS File System? - Server Fault


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Its extremely difficult to achieve what you want. I dont suggest reformatting as there is a means to salvage this. I'd drop /usr completely by copying the entire contents of it into the /usr mounted in /. Something like this should work. I haven't tested it. mkdir /tmp/reroot mount /dev/sda2 /tmp/reroot cp -a /usr/. /tmp/reroot/usr/. vi /etc/fstab # edit ...


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You can move some content from /usr to /home with cp then soft linking the old location to the new. For example you can move the yum data folder, I already did it on some server on the past.


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Partitions must be continuous on a disc, and as your /home and /usr aren't contiguous you can't do what you're proposing. Even if there were you would have to move the start of onw of them, that's generally very hard. It depends on the filesystem how you shrink (if you even can) or expand it, and none of output show what filesystem(s) you use.


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You can't really resize a basic partition, since partitions are made via physical slices of the disk, so: sda 8:0 0 20G ├─sda1 8:1 0 9.8G 0 - 9.8G ├─sda2 8:2 0 4.9G 9.8G - 14,7G ├─sda3 8:3 0 1.5G 14,7G - 16,2G ├─sda4 8:4 0 1K 16,2G - 20G (LOGICAL PARTITION) └─sda5 8:5 0 1000M 16,2G(+1K) - 17,2G You ...


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vdb looks like another disk (a virtual disk) so you can't extend the partition vda1 that is on vda disk to vdb because there are, in fact, different devices. Some workaround are: Use LVM Create a volume group with LVM with vda and vdb as physical device and then create a logical volume that use all the space (both disks). Actually I don't know if this ...


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If there is nothing located on /dev/sda5, what you need to do is to change the partition type of the partition, create a ext4 filesystem on it and then mount it. First of all, you may want to run blkid /dev/sda5 to verify that there isn't anything there. If it identifies something and you want to overwrite it, you can do that using wipefs --all /dev/sda5. ...



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