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8

1.) Start>Run.. 2.) “CMD” 3.) “diskpart” to load up the utility 4.) “list disk” to list all the disks 5.) “Select disk X” where X is the desired disk 6.) “list partition” to list partitions on the selected disk 7.) “select partition X” where X is the desired partition that is currently marked active 8.) “inactive”


6

Formatting a device directly is extremely common in environments where the underlying block device represents something other than a physical disks, and where it is easy to create new devices or resize existing devices. You'll generally see this for iSCSI or Fibre disks, and of course for LVM logical volumes. There is often a substantial disadvantage to ...


5

You could have reserved space for super-users. This can be disabled via tune2fs -m 0 /dev/whatever - but the default for that would be 5%, and that doesn't really fit. The partition does not only need to hold your data but also metadata (inodes!). 14GB used on a 1TB disk seems reasonable if you formated it with the default options. If you are sure inodes ...


4

Chopper is correct. Using ESXi or ESX with VMFS formatted datastores, virtual filesystems only drop by 2-3% in performance when compared to the same filesystem running native on the same hardware. Using VMware Server this performance drop increases due to performance overheads incurred by the host OS outside of VMware's control. At the end of the day I find ...


4

For the most part a 'corrupt partition' is actually referring to a corrupted filesystem. Filesystems are contained within partitions(1). So if the filesystem in one partition gets corrupted, the filesystems in different partitions on the same disk will not be. That said, the same event (abrupt power-down, others) that corrupted one filesystem can also ...


4

That should work. Maybe you'll need to set the RAID as the boot disk in the BIOS. As for the drive letter change: if that happens, there is a fix described in this Microsoft KB.


4

Sounds like a plan, yes. But you should add a step "Make a full backup of the server" to the list.


4

The parted command has a scripting interface as does the sfdisk command, either of these could be used to do what you want.


3

I believe you've run out of inodes on the partition. If you do df -i you will probably find the inode usage is 100%.


3

Start over, initialize the disks again with new LVM VGs and restore from backup.


3

You resized the partition now you have to resize lvm and file system ... You can do that with pvextend and resize2fs read the manual do backup use with consideration... :) All you have to do is extend proper lvm volume in your case I think /dev/ct/root with you new free pe (phisical extends). You can see all volumes using lvdisplay and extend proper one ...


2

You can unmount a ZFS drive, but there is no such thing as a ZFS "partition", it's just not how it works. ZFS is both a file system (like EXT or UFS) and a volume manager (like a RAID HBA, or Linux LVM); you can not separate those functions. If you want to create another ZFS file system in the same tank, just use zfs create tank/new_fs. If you want to mimic ...


2

#!/bin/bash dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sda bs=512 count=1 cat <<EOF | fdisk /dev/sda n p 1 +102400M t fd w EOF partprobe


2

Clonezilla cannot restore a larger partition to a drive that does not have the capacity to handle that partition. Thus if you backup a 200 gig partition, even if it only has 10 gig in used space, you cannot restore that partition to a 100 gig hard drive. My work around was to use restore the image to a larger capacity drive, then use GParted to resize the ...


2

With my little experience in this domain, I can say this will nearly only depend the way your system see the disk order. If your current PATA drive is seen as first disk by the BIOS, then once you remove it if your BIOS see the RAID as first disk, you're ok. The BIOS order is generally the same as Windows order. So if you don't have any other drive, you ...


2

It's the new ESXi 5.5 coredump partition. VMware found that it was often getting truncated logs because coredumps were running out of space. This makes troubleshooting very difficult so they created this partition for that. I haven't tested deleting it myself for a critically low space system but worth finding out if you have a testbed. The documentation ...


2

Yes. It sounds like the previous sysadmin was probably concerned with corrupt filesystems (which are built on partitions), rather than the partition table itself. And filesystems definitely can be corrupted, and splitting them is a traditional measure to reduce the risk. Additionally, smaller filesystems are faster to fsck (or chkdisk or whatever the ...


2

Every additional RAID you create would need to update its superblocks. It would drag performance down, not surprisingly. For RAID-10 there's no point with multiple RAIDs creation, use LVM-2 on top of it, that's all.


1

First try to figure out if there is any error in the partition using "dmesg" command. If you find any error, and if you are not much familiar to fix the issue, a simple reboot may fix the issue. If it is truly a inode related issue, you may reduce your reserved space. It will give some space and also inode as well. (though it is not recommended for ...


1

https://raid.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/RAID_superblock_formats The superblock is 4K long and is written into a 64K aligned block that starts at least 64K and less than 128K from the end of the device (i.e. to get the address of the superblock round the size of the device down to a multiple of 64K and then subtract 64K). The available size of each ...


1

This is how I figured this out (it might be quite specific to my case but I'll try to keep it general where I can). (When I talk about devices, what I mean are the devices the raid volume is composed of, not the raid array itself) I used mdadm -E $DEVICE to figure out which metadata format the array was using. I then went to [0] to find some information ...


1

If you cannot add/replace disks (in which case, if you used LVM, you could grow your ext4 and hence number of inodes on it), you best path is: backup data to some other partition having enough free space (using tar(1), or if you need to minimize downtime for accessing data: rsync(1)) this step only if you need to minimize downtime: rsync again, then ...


1

The Unix System Administration Handbook is a great book (the earlier editions helped me a lot) - it has a section on disk partitioning.


1

While @alharaka's suggestion will work, you might find it easier to use kpartx, as described in this blog post: http://nfolamp.wordpress.com/2010/08/16/mounting-raw-image-files-and-kpartx/ After attaching your disk image to a loop device, kpartx will create device nodes for each of the partitions. I believe kpartx supports GPT.


1

This should get you started.


1

Windows +R Type "cmd" At the prompt type "diskpart" then after the ">" symbol type " list disk" DISKPART> list disk Disk ### Status Size Free Dyn Gpt Disk 0 Online 28 GB 1536 KB Disk 1 Online 233 GB 993 KB 5.Now select the disk which you want to make INACTIVE (For instance if i want to make my Disk 1 as active i.e where the OS is installed ...


1

Ywes, I have seen that repatedly. THe main problem withh standard partition tabelsi s that there is ONE - this is different for example for more modern partitioning technologoies. If that one sector in the disc dies, the partition nifo is just toast.


1

As long as you take a backup prior to degrading the array's then that is the approach I would recommend. Once you have the new drives in you will be able to either expand existing logical volumes into the new physical space or create new logical volumes that utilize the new space.


1

This would be better asked over at the VMware Forums where you can get the advice of people who do this kind of performance tuning for a living. You're not going to get any hard numbers about how much of a hit you're taking here :)


1

You are probably losing some performance by using a virtual disk, so the fastest way would to have a separate drive. Another way would be to have a separate partition on the main drive formatted as NTFS. This is definitely faster than a virtual disk, but it is slower than a separate drive.



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