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37

It is possible to configure Linux behave badly and it certainly is possible to configure FreeBSD behave badly. Both systems can also provide you a stellar performance. But unless your server is really, really busy you won't see any real-world difference between the two. It is best to use the one you already know and concentrate on fine-tuning the daemons ...


23

Since I don't have 50 reputation points I can't comment on Hamish Downer's answer but he is mistaken on his last point. Xen can run unmodified guests however they have to be run as HVM guests which are fully virtualized. Doing this requires that the host computer has hardware virtualization support with Intel VT or AMD-V capable cpu's. Xen and Virtualbox ...


20

Xen will generally perform much better than VirtualBox because VirtualBox runs the guest OS in a way that the guest OS does not know it is running in a virtual environment. Or to put it another way, the guest OS is not modified to run virtually. Because of this, VirtualBox has to 'trap' kernel type instructions, run some custom code and then return control ...


12

From a technical side we did a lot of research and testing in performance, security and stability. The result was that you can misconfigure every OS to be slow and instable. But based on a standard installation with common tweaks FreeBSD was more stable, secure and performant than any other Linux we tried (RedHat, CentOS and Debian). From the financial side ...


5

There hasn't been any major research done on mysql performance to say the least against linux flavors and FreeBSD. My suggestion would be to set aside a week to do some in depth testing using super-smack and sysbench on your own for your hardware to see which OS gives you more bang for your buck for mysql. Some annecdotal evidence of linux outperforming ...


5

The performance difference is likely to be negligible in practice. FreeBSD has had fairly good multiprocessor support since the 2000s. FreeBSD 7 has SMPng support which has been tested to scale well to at least 8 cores. A technical description can be found here and benchmarks can be found here. Multiprocessor support on larger machines (say >16 cores) is ...


2

I can only speak about Xen, as I've only ever used Virtualbox for virtualizing a windows machine on my mac desktop. As others have mentioned, Xen (and XenServer, which is based on Xen) uses paravirtualized kernels that dramatically improves Cpu- and Memory-bound performance characteristics. However, this is only true for Linux hosts with specialized ...


1

The best way to answer question is to load Linux, run some performance tests, and then load FreeBSD and run the same suite of tests. If you get better performance from one or the other, stick with that. However, I am wondering what are the pros and cons of Using FreeBSD instead of Ubuntu or other Linux flavors? You're not really going to get a good ...



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