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3

What's the question here? You don't seem to be comparing apples-to-apples. So I'm not sure if you just want this system to run like your other systems, or if you really care about the cause of the performance difference. You could obtain another of the server model and SKU that you're familiar with. You could use the same type of disks you used in ...


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You should analyze your most frequent queries with EXPLAIN command. The output will tell you how your queries use table indices, which directly affects the performance.


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What happens: you have try to put an elefant into the hamster's ball. What to do: decrease the memory footprint for mysql . . . . . . . . . . [mysqld] user = mysqluser pid-file = /var/run/mysqld/mysqld.pid socket = /var/run/mysqld/mysqld.sock log_error = /var/log/mysql/error.log ...


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If you are able to play around with settings a little, I would try this in my.cnf: innodb_buffer_pool_size = 3000M then restart mysql and check your performance. This would allow you to keep much more of your database in memory, reducing the disk/memory thrashing that you may be seeing. Given that you have 4Gb memory, and assuming this server is ONLY a ...


2

Recognize that Ubuntu 14.04 uses Apache 2 with PHP running through an mpm_prefork module, of which an editable file is in /etc/apache2/mods-enabled/mpm_prefork.conf. Also, recognize that starting in Apache 2.4, MaxClients is now renamed as MaxRequestWorkers, and so any documentation regarding MaxClients needs to be switched to MaxRequestWorkers. Stop the ...


2

I suspect that you have several issues here that are stacking up and causing problems. Disk i/o is fragmented, and probably inefficient. OPTIMIZE TABLE on each of your tables should sort that out and help a bit. Memory is tuned horribly, likely causing issues with having to swap frequently. Slow queries - this is the big suspect for your high CPU usage. ...


2

What you can raise MaxRequestWorkers to depends on how much RAM each of your httpd / apache processes takes up. If each one takes up 50MB (just picking a random number), then every 20 request workers you have in use at once (i.e. concurrent connections) will take up 1GB. So in that example, you could have at most 8GB * 20 = 160 MaxRequestWorkers. However, ...


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At first, the client requests will get queued, until there is a process/thread that gets free on the apache server. So, the clients will see a delay in loading the page. See the MaxClients parameter documentation for more information. When placed in the backlog queue, the client request can eventually time out on the client side. Then the user will see ...


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You'd want to make sure your MaxClients is set to something comfortably above the typical peaks (which is sounds like is 10 in your case but you saw a burst up to 86 once, so maybe 150 to allow some breathing room in case you get a bigger burst). This way you won't run out of connections should that happen and users experience slowness. Be sure you have ...


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This page mentions performance optimising, and mentions things like sync versus async options for NFS. http://nfs.sourceforge.net/nfs-howto/ar01s05.html



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