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9

Cost, capacity and reliability are factors for why SSD adoption hasn't occurred at all levels. SSDs cost more than SAS disks for a given capacity. But in general, servers don't actually come with a particular type of disk. Storage is something that is configured afterwards. Some background information: Are SSD drives as reliable as mechanical drives ...


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In many cases, enterprise storage frames actually employ three different kinds of disks- SSD, SAS and SATA (or LSAS drives which are SATA with a SAS controller), with the goal being to optimize the data being stored with the I/O it actually needs. In other words, data accessed frequently ends up living in the highest speed areas (flash) and data accessed ...


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Many servers still use spinning disks with a SAS interface, but most (all?) servers you buy these days should have options for SSDs as well. The price comparison you're making is a little tricky - an enterprise SAS disk is definitely more expensive than most consumer SSDs, but an enterprise SSD is a whole lot more expensive than a consumer one - they're ...


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You may also be interested in UDF (Universal Disk Format). See UDF OS compatibility table on Wikipedia. The only downside to UDF 2.01 is that there is no native write support for Windows XP (at least without third party utilities). However, writing with Windows 7 and later are natively supported. I recently found myself researching this very topic, and I ...


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Your InnoDB database buffer pool is about 6,6 gigabytes. When inserting data to the database, InnoDB engine first adds the data to the buffer pool, and then writes it to the disk. So, what happened here is that when the buffer pool got full, InnoDB started to write its contents to the disk. Therefore the insert performance dropped. Now, when you stopped ...


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maybe you are running into issues with MTU on the connection. take a look at the following two links, they may contains some usefull info. Configure the MTU with Fragment and MSS Optimizing performance on gigabit networks


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I have solved it. Or rather, I know how to make it faster, but do not know why it is slow. It seems that AES cipher interferes somehow with TCP on this particular server and results in the low performance. If I change the cipher to, say, 3des (which is slower as reported by "openssl speed"), I get 150mbps. After some trials, I now use this: cipher ...


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I would: take a snapshot of mem swap usage drop cache using : sync; echo 3 > /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches monitor how cache is being used next to this. But this may impact performance for a short period to refresh the cache if it is actually mostly hot.



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